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18

Pursuant to Mark Lutton's excellent answer, I'd like to make the point that Chords don't give us feelings, we give chords feelings. The feeling you get after hearing a chord is not inherent in that chord--the only thing inherent in any chord is the physics of the harmonic series. (There is something to be said for consonance vs. dissonance within the ...


18

Context is important -- what else happens around the chord. Let's just take the C major chord for starters. Listen to these examples: The first two measures of Mozart's sonata "for beginners" in C major. A nice, pleasant chord. Happy music. The opening of Mozart's Jupiter Symphony. This has a much more energetic and heroic sound. The opening of the ...


15

Arco (which is not an abbreviation) means to return to bowing after pizzicato (abbreviated pizz.) or col legno. Pizzicato means you pluck the strings with your fingers instead of using the bow, col legno using the wooden backside of the bow instead of the hairs. Ten. is short for tenuto which means holding. In Beethoven it probably means you should hold the ...


13

"Worth the money" is very subjective. Let's instead talk about the various factors you have to consider. Fitting A into B Good quality microphones usually have XLR connectors. These have three wires arranged so that any interference picked up in the cable is cancelled out. Many USB audio interfaces have XLR sockets (but check that the one you choose ...


11

fff is pronounced fortissimo possibile or forte fortissimo ff is pronounced fortissimo f is pronounced forte mf is pronounced mezzo-forte mp is pronounced mezzo-piano p is pronounced piano pp is pronounced pianissimo ppp is pronounced pianissimo possibile or piano pianissimo More than three p's or f's are rarely rarely used. Their only purpose is to note ...


9

In general, I feel that practicing with scales is a good way to learn technique like this, be it crescendoing through a passage, playing at different dynamics, playing with different rhythms, etc. For instance, play an octave of a scale with your right hand loudly. Then play an octave of the scale with your left hand, but softly. Then practice playing ...


9

The feelings and emotions associated with chords are completely subjective, influenced by a combination of nature and nurture. This is why I might go into raptures over a piece of music that leaves you cold, and vice versa. Absolute pitch In This is Spinal Tap, the character Nigel Tufnel says that for him D minor is "the saddest of all keys, I find". Most ...


8

1) Does electric guitar imply heavy usage of dynamic range compression? Not inherently, but electronic compression is applied to the signal of the electric guitar in much of popular music, particularly when the electric guitar is used in a large band with many different instruments competing to be heard in the mix. Jazz musicians who play archtop electric ...


7

First of all, you should become comfortable with both hands separately and together. Then play really, really slowly. Stare at the hand that should be louder and focus all of your mental attention on it. Play it as loudly as possible, while playing the other hand as softly as possible. If you have little to no experience in this, just get the feel of it ...


6

Those two problems you describe (mishitting strings and inconsistency in volume/tone) are only fixed by practice. Lots and lots of practice. They are things you can get away with in a live environment, but they do show up in a studio where every mistake is very evident. I had the same problem - I love gigging, but the first time I went into the studio I ...


6

Some people use "fortississimo" for fff and the equivalent for ppp, but, as you note, that doesn't have any basis in "proper" Italian. American Luke's answer of "fortissimo possibile" is sometimes used for "fff" but only if further gradations, such as "ffff" aren't used. "Triple forte" is the most commonly used expression I've heard in English (with the ...


6

"p" is always softer than "mp" P = soft mezzo = "half" mezzo piano = "half soft" In almost every circumstance what you have seen could be considered a simple editing error. That said, if the intention was to diminuendo and then return to a "mp" marking or in fact grow from a previous "p" marking, then it would not be a typo. I would recommend looking ...


5

@Matthew Read gave some good suggestions, to which I'll add: Try rehearsing the problem sections at a wide variety of tempos, particularly ridiculously fast (once the choir knows the section reasonably well). Unwanted tempo changes become habitual. One way to break that habit is to go much faster (or slower, if the problem is acceleration) than desired, ...


4

The most common way to notate that would be f-ff (or "whatever the first dynamic is"-ff). The idea is that the first time you would play at the first dynamic and the second time you would play the second dynamic. I would advise if there are any other modifications to the verse like crescendos, decrescendos, and accents the verses be separate so the texture ...


4

Victor Zuckerkandl, Sound And Symbol Sound and Symbol is part of Princeton's "Bollingen series". Bollingen is the name of the estate of Carl Jung; hence the whole series represents the "Jungian side" of the sciences. Sound and Symbol is a "symbolist" approach to musical philosophy. It draws from the Spanish symbolists (who split from the Cubists who split ...


4

I can't speak to the psychological reasons or addressing them, but there are a couple things you can try that basically apply to all types of music. 1) Have the weaker members listen to and follow the stronger ones. Ensure they can hear them, of course; don't put them on opposite sides of the stage. The mediocre members will probably do well enough if the ...


4

As you practice, you will find a point where, to get more volume, you stop feeding air through your vocal chords with the diaphragm, and start using the ribcage and other muscles in the chest to force air through your throat. The feeling of this, and the sound produced, may be described as feeling or sounding "overblown" compared to proper technique, similar ...


3

I suggest slowing it way down, so that you have enough time to focus on what your hands are doing. Practice playing the piece (it's simple enough that you probably don't need another exercise), with grossly exaggerated dynamic differences (try fortissimo right hand, and pianissimo left hand). As you get the hang of it, bring the right hand down to a more ...


3

Although singers may go louder on higher notes, as you've noticed, they don't have to - higher notes can be sung more quietly if using solid technique. I can't give you a figure, but it is possible for singers to create a VERY loud sound without harming themselves, and a good example of this are opera singers, who manipulate various aspects such as larynx ...


3

I've always been taught to read mf and mp as abbreviations for "mezzo-forte" and "mezzo-piano" or "moderatamente piano" and "moderatamente forte". Mezzo, in italian, means "half" and moderatamente means moderately (mildly, fairly). Both english and italian wikipedia page about this matter agree. mp, standing for mezzo-piano, meaning "moderately soft". ...


2

The other answers are correct in that mp is always meant to be louder than p; that's simply the meaning of the term. Regarding the Rossini specifically, it's interesting to note that he originally wrote the sonatas (at twelve years old, no less!) for two violins, cello, and double bass. Only later was it rearranged for a traditional string quartet and ...


2

I agree with Dr Mayhem that practice is important to solving the core issues you raise. However, in terms of dynamics between successive picks/hits, some compression might help you. In short, a compressor will even out a signal by attenuating the volume over a certain threshold. These are commonplace in any studio (in fact, if you ask me, they tend to be ...


2

Not really an answer, but something that came up last year. We weren't able to build or locate a Mahler hammer and hammer box, so IIRC a second concert bass drum was appropriated and pressed into service. Both drums survived intact. We pronounced it "fortiss-iss-iss-imo" or just "four fs". The brass, just in front of us, pronounced it "Dear Lord! My ...


2

You really dont need an expensive udio interface. Invest in a good dynamic microphone like the sure sm58 or a condenser mic if really needed. An audio interface also decreases audio latency. This helps when you want to monitor your vocals live with a headphone 'wet' as in with effects.


2

After an hour or so of composing and trying different things, I found my solution: Right click any note head and click Select > All Similar Elements Right click any note and select Note Properties... Set velocity type to auto Click Ok


2

I found that the easiest way to gain independence of the hands in terms of dynamics is to do this: assuming that you know the notes, play only on top of the keys, without pressing the key with the hand that needs to play softly (like the accompaniement) and play regularly with the other hand. If you can't do it together just play separate first. I call this ...


2

There are several difficulties in this piece, but let's concentrate on what I consider the main one for the purpose of your question. The left hand has alternatively one and two keys to press. The first challenge is to produce an even volume on the left hand. Fortunately, the isolated note is situated almost always inside the interval of the two notes of ...


2

You could try playing something that's easy enough that you don't have to think about the notes (like an easy piece you learned when you were starting), play it slowly or with a metronome if necessary, and concentrate on making one hand louder than the other. Once you start getting the idea, you can work on transferring it to the piece that you are learning. ...



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