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When musicians talk to each other, this is what is meant by these two terms: Dynamics refers to loudness and softness, and how you vary these to get different effects. Dynamics can spell the different between boring and fascinating! Articulation refers to how connected or separated the neighboring notes are with respect to each other, e.g. dry, staccato, ...


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I think that different musicians have different ideas about what distinguishes dynamics from articulation. There certainly appears to be a lot of fuzziness along the border between dynamics and articulation. Traditionally, dynamics reference volume and how volume changes over time. This appears to be the general view taken by the wikipedia article on ...


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To me dynamics may include things like crescendo, decrescendo, fermatas, forte, piano, mezzo forte, mezzo piano, accelerando, legato, staccato and the like. Things that generally effect the speed and loudness Articulation to me is a more specific question about how a performer executes the music he plays. The attack of the picking. The use of playing closer ...


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Dynamics include everything that changes the sound -- such as speed, volume, tone, and more. Speed varies from fast to slow, while rests often provide dramatic effect. Volume varies from loud to soft, and the decay of volume varies from sustained (compressor) to pizzicato (such as palm-muted). Tone varies from the mechanical changes such as picking style ...


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You have to understand why playing dynamics make you fail both hands. My guess is that it makes you anticipate the next notes and because you are probably too shaky in both hands, you fail in putting them together. Try combinations of the following: continue practicing hands separately with dynamics play slowly both hands without dynamics, and with ...


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Before you do ANY dynamics, you must be able to play the piece with both hands almost flawlessly. Dynamics are there to be added after the technique has gotten perfected. Play like a robot a few times, then once you've mastered that, you must accent the left hand melody more than the right. Again, no dynamics other than that. Once you've gotten that down, ...


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Play the two hands separately slowly, noticing whether you're playing the melody or the accompaniment.


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Slow down until you can play it (even if it means playing extremely slowly). Then gradually increase your speed.


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Most pieces have the melody played by R.H. and accompaniment by L.H. So we piano players get used to this concept. This is the other way round, and the L.H. is playing the tune. Our left hand is not au fait with this, so it's tricky. You could try, for a bit of fun, swapping hands (and either octaves, or crossing) so it's more of a 'normal' situation. ...


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A complicated proposition to be sure: you are now wrestling with: What I've been taught doesn't fit for what I want to do. This is normal for everyone who writes music. Your patterns of articulation won't make any sense if they don't complement the way the phrase is written. The whole point of articulation is to articulate (see: "express") the line that ...


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Strong opinions ahead... Almost1 all *ahem* proper instruments will inevitably introduce some dynamic variations, because the player will (deliberately or involuntarily) hit each note a bit differently. And a good musician will intuitively get this “right”, whatever that means exactly (there will be more than one right way). Surpressing this ...



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