Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

To build familiarity with this action, you may first practice a piece you already know, or just scales-- one time, focus on making one hand louder than the other, and the next time, focus on the other hand. Play as slow as you need to, to get the "feeling" correct, or at least, not as alien or hard. After that warm-up, practice the passage in which you need ...


1

When starting to work on any technique like this, I've found it's good to isolate it down to something so incredibly simple that you are focusing only on the technique and its clarity and not at all on the happenings of a piece. You can use a very simple five finger exercises you already know very well (ex. Hanon 1), but to start, I would recommend just ...


4

You can focus much more easily on the dynamics by making everything else easier (and thus either automatic or requiring little attention). You could practise playing this way with a simpler piece or one you already know well. Slowing down is also very effective — as a extreme example, if you're only pressing one note every 10 seconds is makes it ...


3

As a mature (elderly?) learner, I faced a similar difficulty about a year ago, and found these ideas helped: With the "quiet" hand, keep the fingers as close to the keys as possible at all times (if possible, make sure that they never actually lose contact with the keys) and lift the fingers of the other hand off the keys before playing the note (loudly). ...



Top 50 recent answers are included