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1

There exists a "normal" dynamic. This "normal", however, is not a generic dynamic marking, but a specific marking that fits each piece. For example, a normal dynamic for a Chopin nocturne might be p, but a normal dynamic for a Liszt etude might be f. Basically, the "zero level" for each song is different. If you want to implement a "normal" dynamic, don't ...


1

In the same way that verbal tempo indications (andante, largo etc.) indicate more than just BPM measured with a clock, verbal dynamics indications mean more than just volume as measured by a decibel meter. "mp" means to approach the music as though it were "quiet music" even if the overall volume is not dissimilar from "mf" -- though the latter could be ...


1

It's all relative. It will depend on the venue, the size of orchestra, the whim of the conductor. When a 'middle' level is established, then the proper markings come into their own, as in mp will be a little quieter, while mf is a little louder. As far as 'is ff twice as loud as f?' is concerned, please don't ask! Haven't met a conductor with a decibel meter ...


1

(1) Exactly, "until instructed otherwise" - the instruction lasts until the end of the piece if there are no more dynamic markings. (2) There is no such thing as 'playing normally' - a piece should have a dynamic marking on the very first note. If it doesn't I would probably assume mezzo-forte but this is speculation only, there is no convention. Pieces ...


2

In addition to also recommending the Adler, I'd also recommend Alfred Blatter's Instrumentation and Orchestration. Blatter teaches orchestration at the Curtis Institute, which if you know anything about the music world, is a pretty good school. It's a good book because it gives you dynamic curves (read: "responsiveness") for each instrument, which helps ...


2

I've worked from the Rimsky-Korsakov before, but maybe you could also check out Samuel Adler's The Study of Orchestration. I don't think it's perfect by any means, but I haven't run across any better books in regards to contemporary performance and practice. It does cover instrumentation pretty heavily, but maybe take a look (you know, before buying it) and ...


2

In scores for greater ensembles as well as for instrument groups (say 2 bassoons and contrabassoon notated in the same score) the dynamic is typically written below the voice it belongs to.


6

On piano music, with treble and bass clefs, if the dynamics mark is between them, it refers to both parts (hands). If it's for the treble, it's found above the treble, and if for bass alone, it's found under the bass.


4

You should try to sweep without palm muting any strings that you play, otherwise you will not be able to produce a fluid and open sound. In your example, you should palm mute the E and A strings because they are not used. Note, however, that this doesn't mean that your picking hand is totally fixed to the bridge. It should be able to move freely, which can ...


0

In the end I'm going to put a dim. under the note, and a (probably) a dynamics mark on the next note since I don't want the accent implied by sfp (c.f. leftaroundabout's answer)


1

Sforzando-piano, 𝆍𝆑𝆎𝆏 is pretty much that. If you put a hairpin under a single note then it's actually an accent, which in fact is also often interpreted as reducing the volume during the note (as opposed to tenuto, where the whole note duration is emphasised). Both of these indicate that the initial note attack is to be emphasised, mind. If you don't ...


1

Technically, the opposite would be: gradually less reinforced I do not know the Italian term for this, but without using any text I think the effect could be accomplished with tenuto, gradually lengthening phrase markings, and a decrescendo.


0

Norman Del Mar's *Anatomy of the Orchestra", perhaps. It was deliberately written to cover "things I haven't seen in other books".



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