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4

A past iteration of the Wikipedia page on Mozart's compositional method had a good summary of the mythologization that took place regarding Mozart in the 19th century. (The fact that that page has been substantially reworked is a testament to the extent to which that process is still contentious today.) Note, the following is an old wikipedia link ...


0

Transcibing is a high-focus activity even when you are doing it routinely. Like with professional straight-tone instrument tuning (organ, harmonium, accordion) by ear, the principal qualification of distinguishing and recognizing pitches and relations may be a base qualification, but the real deal is actually being able to focus reliably for hours on end, ...


2

Other posters have pretty much captured it, I think, but it might help to think of yourself retelling a joke you just heard. Chances are you don't remember it word-for-word, and if you were trying to recall it that way, you'd fail. You do remember the basic shape and form of the joke (probably not least because it shares the shape and form in common with ...


2

I had a professor tell us about a comp lesson with Igor Stravinsky once. (I know right?!?) He paged once, slowly through the piece my professor brought at his desk then moved to the piano and started playing excerpts pointing out places that could have been different and why they might work better.... leaving the score at his desk. So I'd say totally ...


3

This happens to me as well, and not only in ear training. It happens when I play an instrument (some days I play well, some days I don't), in running (some days I don't get tired at all, other days I can barely walk), when studying math etc. This happens because you are not yet 'good' at it. When I first started playing the bass, I had my on and my off ...


11

All documented resources I can find agree with the story. The Pope, instead of excommunicating Mozart, conferred on him the Order of the Golden Spur, a papal knighthood, for "contributing to the glory of the Church" through his transcription of the Miserere. The record of that award, as well as the minutes of that audience, are part of the archives of the ...


18

Neuroscience still can't explain some of the amazing things human brains can do. A person alive in our time has interesting and similar ability to mentally manage music in a way that suggests that some people might be wired for this sort of thing. The study detailed at http://www.radiolab.org/story/148670-4-track-mind/ showed that Bob Milne has the ability ...


18

It's worth noting that the Miserere is extremely repetitive. For example, this version is roughly 15 minutes long, but you get all the melodic and harmonic content in the first 2:45 except for the final cadence; everything after that is more verses set to the same music. Mozart still would have had to remember the varying text overlay as well as any ...


6

I agree with what microtherion says: Most professional classical pianists who practice pieces during all their lives end up remembering an outstanding succession of notes and rhythm and this is mostly due to patterns (physical, visual, melodic, etc.) that help organize and make sense of what they recall. If you were to present a professionally trained ...


23

I wasn't there, but I would not find it completely out of the question. In every field of expertise, experts are capable of chunking information in ways that amateurs are not. An expert listener will not just hear a few hundred notes performed by several voices, they will hear harmonies, their relationships to each other, and rhythmical patterns. More ...


2

Becoming good at taking dictation is a huge undertaking. It sounds like you're doing the right things with sight singing, which is really the key to being able to transcribe music well. In college, beginning dictation tests went like this: listen to a short excerpt 4 times, have a pause, then once more. For the piano transcriptions of chorales they ...


0

I am not certain if I have perfect pitch. In fact, I probably do not as if one would ask me to sing, for example, c, or f# I cannot. I do have relative pitch, and have always been rather successful at this. Where I am confused in this topic, are instances where I will hear a note, and will be usually able to identify it correctly, after checking on an ...


1

No. True perfect or absolute pitch is an inborn and automatic trait that cannot be trained or learned. People with true absolute pitch hear different musical tones as clearly and effortlessly as normally-sighted people see different colors. It tends to be approximately as rare as true tone deafness (that is, it's a lot less common than many people think), ...


-2

Try Auralia software and similar ones. And write your own music in various keys and you will develop it if do whish. All who have perfect pitch they had worked hard with sounds from infant age. No miracle exists. PP is not everything you need to be a top player. It is an ability to take a snapshot of sound in your impressive memory. When you are playing a ...


-1

There are three basic functions a chord can have in a song: Tonic Function, Subdominant function, or Dominant Function. They get their functions from their numerical position in a key. Tonic Function (stability) I, III, VI Subdominant Function (contrast) II, IV Dominant Function (tension) V, VII This works in Major or Minor, A III chord and a bIII chord ...


4

Subdominant and dominant are tonal music terms, they may or may not make sense in a modal context. In tonal music (like common practice era classical music) you are hard pressed to find an Em functioning as dominant for Am. E is used almost exclusively. Today's popular music has more modal roots. A (non-raised) seventh degree major chord (G in Am) is a very ...


2

Maybe it comes down to the Human predilection to label everything. In, say, Cmaj., all the white notes( aka keys) on a keyboard can be used; n Amin., the same. They're the diatonic notes. So if a melody is only using those white notes, any chords produced from their combinations will fit the melody at some point. When the melody seems to gravitate more ...



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