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1

Someone asked me to convert and elaborate a comment to an answer, so here goes: I believe that once a level of mastery (being a 'professional', as was termed in the question) is obtained there isn't much thought really, more just expression. To explain, asking someone what they are thinking about when they are talking in a native language would likely ...


2

As a guitar player, I learned notes by shapes and positions. The same note can sound in various places on a guitar so guitar players learn to find sweet spots on the guitar where a particular melody can be played without shifting position too much. Which shapes? The standard set of shapes are found in the CAGED system but I found that a little too ...


3

Because music is an abstract language, I'm not sure your question can be answered easily or in any of the ways you described. For me, it's a combination of my mental image of the notes on the staff, vague mental image of those notes on the keyboard, and muscle memory of how both images are supposed to sound and feel. I don't know that I consciously think of ...


2

Previous to learning scales, for me it was very much hit or miss. Certain notes following each other became familiar, rather like using the same few words in several sentences. When I knew scales, it changed rather. Listening to a piece, a key is established, the sort of scale used is recognised, and the fingers (usually) tend to follow the tune ...


5

It's going to vary, and you have to remember that there are also a lot of pros that learned by listening and copying what they heard on records without learning to read music. Notes can be known "personally" and this includes knowing all the various chords and scales as they relate to them. There may be no names or functions involved--I think of it as a kind ...


2

For the violin it is a combination of both muscle memory and micro-adjustments. The violinist is always adjusting as she plays. To the great virtuoso Jascha Heifetz is attributed the following quote: "I play as many wrong notes as anyone, but I fix them before most people can hear them."


5

Like the comments said, it's a combination of both. As a trombone player, we have the muscle memory to hit notes at what should be in tune, but what is in tune may also vary. You tune the notes based on what is in tune in context (surrounding ensemble/accompanist), the tuning will not always be A = 440, so you need to have the ability to hear tuning and ...


0

Get a stringed instrument. Master going from fundamental tone to one octave up by pressing down fret 12. Get a really good grasp of the intervals from 0-x and x-12 where x is a fret within the octave... Then one day, get a fretless instrument. Although the excerpt you wrote says "atonal" I think it more as unrestricted pitch or continuous pitch.


1

I learned to recognize intervals by associating each of them with a different melody. For example: Minor second - Jaws theme Major second - Do Re Mi Minor third - Greensleeves Major third - For He's the Jolly Good Fellow Perfect fourth - Yankee Doodle Augmented fourth - The Simpsons Theme Perfect fifth - Star Wars theme Minor sixth - Love Story ...



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