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2

Always keep in mind the goal is to be able to more effectively write, improvise, and perform music. There's no street cred or punk rock points for the way you practice at home if it doesn't lead to a better performance. Both methods you outline are obviously valuable. The main benefit in slowing the music down, however, is not a matter of making it easier. ...


1

I think there is a limit to how much you should position yourself out of your comfort zone. The time you waste on the really hard bits of what you are transcribing could be put to use in something else. I don't have any studies to back me up here, but I do remember some great jazz artists saying that they would transcribe without 100% accuracy, so they ...


1

It seems we're having the same problem here, tapping into the well-fed musical inner ear we all have rather than being stuck in the over analytical and somewhat sterile frame of mind. My own toolbox for that : Ear training, especially on common melodies, or any melody that just won't leave, even if I have to wait a whole day before testing my solution on ...


2

Start simple. Take a familiar tune like "Happy Birthday" and pick a starting note. Lets just pick "G" (this means you will be playing the tune in the key of C Major). Keep trying to play the song, re-starting from the beginning every time until you can get through the entire thing. At first, this will be difficult. You'll play the first 8 notes, and ...


2

I suggest starting with lead sheets, with melody and chords only. The term "playing by ear" was always a pejorative when I was young. It meant some kind of illiterate flailing at the instrument, maybe learning rote patterns with no idea of how they worked together musically. (Think of little kids playing "Heart and Soul" with four hands - great fun.) But ...


2

Here are some suggestions, have a try and let us know how it goes: Get a feel for the tune CD player / Media player, play a tune that is not too complicated you have never learnt Listen to the whole tune a few times until you can hear in your head what the next melody will be before it plays Learn in parts - Play a few seconds at a time (a phrase) and ...


1

Maybe get in the habit of singing along with your guitar. Or maybe I should say, play along with your voice. It seems that when you use your voice, your natural creativity comes out more directly. So if you allow your voice and your hands to track each other, maybe your inner creativity will have an easier time flowing through your guitar.


4

I would call what you want to do - playing melodies by ear. It's easier to do on piano because of the logical way the keyboard is laid out. Ascending one key is always a semitone higher, descending lower. Piano was the first instrument I learned to play and I quickly developed the ability to play any melody by ear on the piano. With guitar, it took ten ...


8

There are two components involved here. One is indeed ear training, and the other one is knowing your instrument well, i.e. being able to produce any melody as effortlessly as you do with your voice. And for this second part, you do not need to consciously know the intervals as long as you intuitively find the right notes on your instrument. But anyway, ...



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