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It's subjective. Some people just seem to have inbuilt good timing, others, who've played for years, don't seem to notice a skipped beat, an added beat, slowing down, etc. And for those, a metronome probably won't help. I've tried drum machines with them, and they didn't help either.Generally they're folks that play by themselves for long periods. It ...


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You're definitely on the right track. Modifying the tempo of whatever you're working on is crucial to developing your skills as a guitar player. Playing with a click (the metronome) is very important in developing what I call your "inner metronome". If you can't play on beat, then when you play with a band or have to perform by yourself your tempo will be ...


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I just did a project like this. Some things that I found helpful: There are programs that will slow down an audio file without changing its pitch, which can help to hear fine details. If possible, it's better to do this on non-lossy audio files (e.g., raw CD rips) than on mp3s. Headphones may be better than speakers for this kind of task (then again, maybe ...


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You could try figuring out the chords to the song (or look online) and go up the scale from the root notes on a per chord basis, trying to match the pitch that's being sung that is also NOT the lead vocals, I guess. This assumes that you know some theory and can play an instrument though. This would be rather tedious, but it's how I'd do it since I'm ...


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I am a big fan of solfege, you know, "do, re, mi." ("do" is pronounced like "dough", not "doo") There is a lot of (ego-based) disagreement about whether to use the fixed-do or the movable-do system. If you want to develop both the ability to read a melody and, having heard a melody, the ability to write it down, I would practice with movable do. Fixed do is ...



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