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14

Although the general principles are pretty much the same (set the relief of the neck, set the action of the strings, adjust the intonation, etc.), the short answer to your question is to set it up the best you can and learn to play the low B with a lighter touch. The longer answer involves scale length and string tension. What Is Scale Length? The scale ...


12

First of all I would recommend buying a used one since you will get better value for the price. Also if you decide to stop playing you can still sell the bass for roughly the same as you bought it for. The Knobs you are referring to are the tone and volume pots (which is short for "potentiometers" or electric circuits that enable the attenuation of a signal ...


12

The technical term is glissando or gliss slide. Whether you're going up or down or both, basically it's a long slide.


11

The "Hi" input attenuates the input signal, usually by between 10-15dB (about half to a third the original volume). The "Low" input will not do this. Different guitars and basses produce widely varying signal levels. This isn't just a passive vs active thing; plug a vintage-voiced Strat into the amp, then a PAF-voiced Les Paul; you'll have to turn the gain ...


11

Welcome to the wonderful world of non-standard intonation. You will like it here. I have answered here on instruments where you have to dictate the intonation: slide and steel guitar and theremin. I haven't mentioned violin/fiddle, because by the time you're good enough for it to be worthwhile to ask questions in this sort of forum, you've already learned ...


10

the only difference to anormal bass is the shape. The shape may result in a slightly different tone from the bass, but otherwise it is just a normal bass with a violin shaped body. The most famous user is probably a little guy called Paul McCartney...


10

I would roughly order the contributors to electric guitar tone as: Amp and effects Body type (solid, hollow, semi-hollow) Tone knobs in the instrument Pickups and their position Picking method, and player's touch (fingers/picks/plectrum; plectrum type) String gauge and type Bridge type (floating vs fixed) Neck construction (through-neck or bolt-on) Body ...


10

Yes there is a very simple way to prevent this. Instead of just plugging it in directly to your guitar/bass, you can loop it though your strap(picture coming soon). By doing this, all the force from stepping on your cable or moving to much will be transferred to your strap and not the input jack. If you do move to far from your amp you could still yank it ...


9

First of all, I would check whether the neck is straight. Place a ruler against the frets (the edge of the ruler against the frets) and if there is any space between any of the frets and the ruler, the neck is not entirely straight. If there is no access to any sort of truss rod adjustment, then you will probably have to put up with the high action. If ...


9

You can localize it by playing the string lightly and placing your ear closely to the different contact points of the string to the hardware on the guitar. Start with the bridge, and move your way up the guitar to the nut and where the string meets the tuning machine peg. Note: The terminology in the following paragraph can be ambiguous, as there are two ...


9

It is actually nowhere near as dangerous as you might think, as long as you keep the volume relatively low. You won't get an ideal frequency response, as a guitar amp is designed for the frequencies a guitar produces, but it will do as a stop-gap until you get a suitable amp. The reason for keeping the volume lower than you might want to is that the large ...


9

Volume is obviously not the only aspect of an instrument's sound: frequency distribution, attack characteristics, sustain, tuning accuracy etc. are equally or more important. Short scales tend to (but don't necessarily) result in shorter sustain less pronounced treble frequencies somewhat "flappier" attack less well-defined pitch control. Most of this ...


9

For windows: The bare-bones way is to use the microphone or the line-in. I found the line-in to be a better choice, but either way, you need to reduce the amplifier volume to avoid clipping. This volume level will be pretty low, and it is specific to your equipment. After you adjust the amplifier volume, you can then adjust the overall volume on the ...


8

This may sound silly, but it really worked for me: Whenever I was sitting down, I practiced bouncing my right thumb off of my right kneecap. I was going for a real bounce, not a whack (that hurt). At school, on the bus, watching TV---I practiced my slap technique all the time, even when I wasn't anywhere near my bass. Goofy, sure, but totally effective.


8

I will echo some sentiments; the bass you should buy is the bass that feels best in your hands. Here are some tips from a Bass Player magazine article on the topic of buying a bass: If you have a bass that you can use indefinitely (i.e. borrowed from a friend, cheap starter bass), keep it around until you can save up to buy your dream bass. Having an ...


8

They assume different signal levels so have different levels of gain in the pre-amp. In fact on some amps the low input has a pre-amp but the high just goes directly into the main amp. This is to cope with the fact that instruments can have very different output signal levels, but it can also be used to change the tone of the sound produced.


8

I would focus on hardware, not so much on software. Get a decent digital audio interface; you can find some for under $200 USD. You can use pretty much any recording software, such as Audacity which has already been mentioned. I use an Alesis io|2 for example; very simple, just 2 analog channels, midi in/out, and connects to my laptop via USB. With this ...


7

It sounds like the neck is not straight. Ensure it is bolted or otherwise attached to the body, and then check up at the nut for an allen wrench slot. Many necks have an adjustable tension (truss) rod. ( see: http://www.tunemybass.com/bass_setup/adjusting_neck_relief.html ) When done improperly, this can break the neck, so...don't break the neck.


7

Looking online, opinion seems to be split about the merits of doing this, with some sources pointing out that you can simply buy a fretless neck for a reasonable price. But I certainly remember bass playing friends of mine removing the frets from basses, to convert to fretless, and I can understand why you would want to do this with a bass you don't ...


7

a tuner First off, I'd put a tuner; but this isn't really an effects pedal and you can get the same functionality in non-pedal form. a compressor : A compressor is probably the most used effects for bassists, by suitably tuning the controls you can make the attack and release of the notes more sharp providing a stronger, some might say punchier, rhythmic ...


6

I know this sounds counter-intuitive, but you might want to turn the treble knob back up a bit. When you play a note, it produces the fundamental pitch you want, but also a lot of overtones that contribute to the tone. You don't hear them consciously; your brain takes it all in and adds them together, perceiving the sum of the fundamental and its overtones ...


6

Contrary to what the previous answers stated, the different sensitivity is not the primary difference between the "hi" and "lo" inputs. It is indeed different, usually by 6 dB, but you could achieve this with the gain knob alone.More important is the different impedance of both inputs: a "hi" input has a very high inner electric resistance (in the range of 1 ...


6

Changing the gauge of string will change the tension which affects everything in my opinion. I've been playing for 20 years and for the first 16 of those I thought I was doing quite well setting up my instruments action, truss rod, etc by carefully following instructions found in books, magazines, and then eventually the internet. I was wrong. Then I ...


6

To me it sounds like a bass guitar with distortion or a fuzz effect. Also since it's a rock band with a bassist it might not be a synth part. Edit: Looking at live videos, it seems he does use a synth [at least in the live version], but I still think you can replicate this with a bass guitar + distortion/fuzz Most of the fuzz pedals I have used with bass ...


6

This is really up to what you want to do. I think I first started out with a fuzz pedal, but I don't use it so much. A lot of bassists use a wah wah pedal. I have one myself and it is pretty fun. If you like this kind of sound, you can also try out an envelope filter. It is pretty nice as well. I also use a octaver from time to time, but only on certain ...


5

The classic Höfner "violin bass" design, from circa 1958, is a hollow-body archtop instrument with a spruce top, like an archtop guitar but without F-holes. It has a "floating" wooden archtop bridge. It has a short-scale neck which is small and has a narrow fingerboard width and string-spacing. It should be strung with the original-specification flatwound ...


5

On my Ampeg amp, the instructions said that if you are playing a bass with passive pickup(s), to plug into the 0db jack; and if your bass has active pickups, to use the -15db jack.


5

The change in tension is likely to cause a difference in the bowing of the neck, and adjusting the truss rod is the way to fix it. However, I don't think you should be too scared of tackling it yourself. Fit the new strings. Play. If everything feels fine, stop worrying and keep playing. If you feel there are problems with the action high up the ...



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