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4

It is important to remember that you are a human being first, a musician second, and a bassist third. Musical instruments are not monogamous. As a musician, you feel a need (on some level) to express yourself. The manner in which you do so may change throughout the course of your life, and that's okay. Personally, I cycle through several instruments, ...


3

As Tim mentioned, there doesn't seem to be too much of a need for a specific amp for a low B. I play a 5-string through a Peavey TKO 115 Combo that I bought 12 years ago and it does the trick (and sounds better than the new version). The real thing to notice here is that bass frequencies require more wattage to properly project. This is why a 100 watt ...


2

Adding to piofusco's comment above, I'll agree that it's sweat which cases the blisters and irritation. An additional option beyond applying something to your hands is to change the strings you're using. Geezer Butler is a big fan of DR's coated strings specifically because he finds them to be very good at wicking sweat from his fingers, eliminating his ...


2

Let me point out a common misconception about your hands. It is moisture/sweat that leads to blisters and irritation. As an experienced rock climber, I have witnessed many new climbers come into the gym and use lotion before a climbing workout. The result - tons of blisters and zero durability. Your hands work best when they are dry, not lubricated. ...


1

After gathering more information about your bass through comments I am going to offer some thoughts. It is clear from the description of the problem that for whatever reason, you are getting fret buzz. Fret buzz most commonly results from the vibrating string contacting another fret. Most often this is because the string is too close to the fret it is ...


1

Often to avoid fret buzz you need a little bit of relief in the neck, loosening the truss rod in the neck until it curves forward just a little. Whether you need to do this, and how much, depends on other things, especially how low you have your bridge saddles. The higher the saddles, the less relief you need. On a normal (non-bass) guitar, unless the fret ...


1

You're mostly right that if the sound isn't coming out of the amp it doesn't matter as much. But excessive fret buzz is indicative either of poor technique, or an instrument in need of adjustment. Make sure you're fretting as close to the fret as possible, and plucking the string as nearly to perpendicular as possible (unless of course you're ...


1

This is could be a problem with the pots. I had a similar problem before and removed the scratch plate (or like yours the back plate) and have all the pots changed. I decided to replace all the pots (and not just the one causing the problem) as it was a very old bass and it was likely that the other old pots would sooner or later cause problems as well. ...



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