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10

Yes there is a very simple way to prevent this. Instead of just plugging it in directly to your guitar/bass, you can loop it though your strap(picture coming soon). By doing this, all the force from stepping on your cable or moving to much will be transferred to your strap and not the input jack. If you do move to far from your amp you could still yank it ...


9

I would roughly order the contributors to electric guitar tone as: Amp and effects Body type (solid, hollow, semi-hollow) Tone knobs in the instrument Pickups and their position Picking method, and player's touch (fingers/picks/plectrum; plectrum type) String gauge and type Bridge type (floating vs fixed) Neck construction (through-neck or bolt-on) Body ...


8

For windows: The bare-bones way is to use the microphone or the line-in. I found the line-in to be a better choice, but either way, you need to reduce the amplifier volume to avoid clipping. This volume level will be pretty low, and it is specific to your equipment. After you adjust the amplifier volume, you can then adjust the overall volume on the ...


7

I would focus on hardware, not so much on software. Get a decent digital audio interface; you can find some for under $200 USD. You can use pretty much any recording software, such as Audacity which has already been mentioned. I use an Alesis io|2 for example; very simple, just 2 analog channels, midi in/out, and connects to my laptop via USB. With this ...


5

As with any dexterity exercise, slow it down! Your hands are likely hurting because you're trying to push them too hard to either: stretch while playing (you should always be doing this before playing) keep up with the exercise speed emulate the sound exactly (for a beginner, this is exceeding difficult) or fret too heavily as with the answer above me, ...


5

Golden rule: When you hurt, stop! You don't want to damage your hand. It might make you stop playing music for ever! The spider as you said is for building dexterity. Hence, at first it will hurt if you are a beginner. But think of it as this: When you start running to build dexterity (and you are out of shape), you won't be able to run for a long time at ...


4

It is more important to get the distance from strings to fretboard correct than the distance from strings to pickups, so if you have the action setup right I would be content with minor discrepancies from the ideal pickup separation. There is so much difference between pickups anyway that if it really concerned you you could just buy a different pickup that ...


4

Yes. The "split coil" pickup (actually two separate pickups placed close together under the strings) is a humbucking, noise-cancelling design. These have been standard on the Fender Precision Bass since the early 1960s. Split-coil noise-canceling design However, the original "vintage" Fender Precision Bass pickup is a single pickup with a single coil, ...


3

If you're using active electronics, as silly as this sounds, verify that the battery isn't dead. I had a similar issue with my first bass, and it turned out to be the 5 dollar 9-volt battery-swap fix. After verifying that, as stated in the previous answer, see if you can pad the input somehow to make sure that you're not slamming the preamp.


3

The pickups could be clipping the input gain stage of your amplifier. I doubt it has anything to do with the knobs, since active electronics can give out a very hot signal. Can you give us more information on what you're using for an amplifier? What active electronics are you using, specifically? I doubt you'll kill the speakers if it is input clipping ...


3

Here are my thoughts (as requested separately): Assuming we keep a fairly standard, balanced amp EQ (I don't want to drag amps into it particularly) there are some factors which will have a major impact on the tone you get. I am by no means an authority on this, but I can generally tell the difference between a Fender Precision Bass and a Fender Jazz Bass ...


1

+1 for looping the cable through your strap. However if you're really active moving about on on stage, why not consider investing in a decent radio system and do away with the cable altogether? It's by no means a cheap alternative, but the price of reasonable wireless systems have come down such that you only need to have to replace your trodden-on cable a ...


1

Wrapping the cable around your strap is also kinder to the cable. If it gets yanked (eg if you step on it), the point where the force is at its most is kind of spread out over the strap, with a bit of give, so the cable will likely survive intact. If it's just in the plug, it'll either pull it out, or pull sideways and the main 'tug' will be straight on the ...


1

Most pick-ups are pretty flat, and fingerboards are cambered.This is usually reflected somewhat in the contour of the saddles. So it's going to be a compromise anyway.The figures quoted are more of a starting point than anything exact - some players prefer higher, some lower, action, and each bass,( or guitar) will have its own slight idiosyncracies. Sort ...


1

The effects loop on an amp.is where the pre-amp and post amp. are joined, or interrupted. The pre-amp has all the eq. in it, and the post is usually just a power amp.So, yes, I think the fx will be coloured by any tone changes made on the pre-amp., which is pretty standard. By starting with every pot flat, theoretically there would be no colouration. If you ...


1

Guitar tone is greatly influenced by the frequency response of the pickup, and position. For instance, you can tell apart a neck pickup tone from a bridge tone, regardless of the amount of distortion. Similarly, you can tell a bright pickup apart from a muddy one. You can also tell a semi-hollow tone from a solid body, as well as differences in string gauge: ...


1

The humble guitar lead (cable) only got a cursory mention. It's the ONLY connection from guitar to amp.Whilst lots of players use good leads, lots use cheap ones.These often strangle the signal from a guitar, and thus the tone doesn't migrate properly to the amp.So, I think leads ought to be high on the list.


1

Tone quest = simplify the signal chain with the most optimal gear that can cover clean to mean (dirty) tone. I am not going to cover pedals as to keep this simple and I will use the Blues model wherein the guitar and amp are one instrument: Strings-->guitar body-->pick ups-->preamp tubes-->power tubes-->speakers-->cabinet Example: DR Strings PHR10 Pure ...


1

td;dr: Pickups are over-rated. Hmm, I'm sure I did this rant somewhere before... As you already say, many factors contribute to a guitar's sound. And from the start, the sound is all mechanical vibration, so obviously the body etc. can't be neglectable. Clearly, the mechanical parts matter more in acoustic guitars than in electric ones: there, what you ...


1

Ok, I found an answer. I have an existing Rocksmith Cable from the game and I can use that with my MAC and Garageband. I found a procedure on youtube what will add the Rocksmith cable as an Aggregate device. Now I can jam with GB on my Mac plugged into my amp! SWEET!! Thanks @slim for your help.


1

Sounds like you are overloading the pre amp.Just as a guitarist would when turning up the pre-gain.To clean up that sound, he would turn the volume down at the guitar.At that point, the guitar volume pot. becomes a sort of distortion control. What's wrong with leaving the bass guitar volume down enough to achieve a clean sound, and turning up the amp? On ...


1

Only just picked up your question.Probably you've equipped yourself with a bass by now. However - if one is used to a standard guitar, the bass will feel like a different beast. That's 'cos it is !Longer strings will be necessary anyway, so it's worth just playing in a different way. You will get used to it. Longer strings will give more 'body' to the sound ...



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