Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

It makes sense for the bridge tuners to be about in the middle of their travel (a couple of turns in from the top is recommended) while the new strings are being tuned using the head machine heads. That way, any subsequent adjustment at the bridge will be available, up or down. Maybe the tech didn't do this, but should have. Yes, your plan should work - and ...


6

Well, "tone" is basically just a pot and a capacitor. Either can be broken, or there can be a mismatch to the pickup (if the pickup is not the original one). If "suddenly" is indeed a jump in tone quality at 10%, then the pot is likely broken, with the wiper losing contact with the track at this angle. You might or might not have success with pot spray. ...


5

I'm not sure this is an answer, so much as a list of things to consider… Simple rule - more gain, more buzz. Guitar pickups are, by their very nature, susceptible to all kinds of interference - hum from fluorescent tubes, old-style CRT TVs etc & to a lesser degree, even assuming everything is properly earthed, the mains circuit itself. Any fluctuation ...


5

1. Stop Playing 2. Go to the Doctor Seriously, your health is more important than your studies and your playing. Why potentially damage a half century of playing guitar and your career to save a few hours? What you describe doesn't sound trivial to me and could be indicative of something more serious that could affect all areas of your life, not just your ...


5

Along any single string, one could (in principle) achieve any desired intonation by appropriately placing the frets; fanning implies some desired relationship between the intonation on the different strings -- but it's unclear from your question where you are going with that. Playing a fretless guitar (not very common, but fretless basses and all orchestral ...


5

Did you not get the 10 Commandments with your new guitar, starting with 'Thou shalt spend inordinate amounts of time, effort and money etc ? Seriously, the search for the Holy Grail is what spurs most guitarists to spend. It's usually a special sound that exists in the guitarist's head and in reality in the fingers of his favourite player. If my wife needs ...


4

You should try to sweep without palm muting any strings that you play, otherwise you will not be able to produce a fluid and open sound. In your example, you should palm mute the E and A strings because they are not used. Note, however, that this doesn't mean that your picking hand is totally fixed to the bridge. It should be able to move freely, which can ...


4

I don't know the answer but I feel for you - but seriously: See a doctor!! This is your health you're talking about, and although it might not seem so at the moment, that's much more important than your exams. I know you can get pain in all sorts of weird places when your nerves are messed up, and back pain may be a factor in that, but I'm no doc. It may be ...


4

Wireless microphone system with a 1/4in plug adapter for the guitar. This is pretty common for many instruments in live performance.


4

Based on what you have written in your question I would suggest you just take it to a luthier. There are so many things you can get wrong here that it probably is not worth it. Widening the groove too far will lead to buzzing and tone problems and is not reversible - messing this up requires replacing the nut. There are good examples of videos on YouTube ...


3

I'm guessing with all the bending you appear to do on that low B, that it's already quite a thin gauge string. The nut slot will have been produced for a 'standard' B string, about .054 .058 ish. Have you tried a slightly thinner B string? It might solve the problem of binding in the nut. I'm not sure what the gauge is that Paul would put as standard, but as ...


3

Well, first of all don't expect your 10w amp will sound like the Marshall stacks you hear on rock records. Usually those beginner amps are pretty bare bones and sound passable when you are just starting out but you will eventually upgrade to a better amp with more tonal options. For the time being, start experimenting with the knobs and see how each one ...


3

This might help : Haynes Guitar Books I have the Stratocaster one and found it full of great info. The guitar books are intended as a bit of 'uselful humour', I guess - if you haven't heard of Haynes, they're a part of the home auto mechanic's folklore (in UK at least): Historically, from the 1960's, Haynes manuals have provided great information on how ...


3

Conventional wisdom is to put timing effects like delay and reverb absolutely last in your effects chain. If you use an effects loop, they would usually go in the loop after the pre-amp stage and all other effects, so it makes sense to put your delay pedal after the modeler. Most guitarists do it that way to avoid exactly the kind of muddiness you are ...


3

This depends on what you are satisfied with. If you are satisfied with the sound that the amp gives you, you don't need to change anything. You can play with that sound. Many people don't like the default sound, so they try to find some other sound. I, personally, think that it won't harm you to try to find some sound you like most. As a ...


3

Could be feedback from speaker to guitar. There is acoustic feedback where the strings vibrate driven by the speakers, and magnetic feedback where the magnetic field from the speaker feeds directly into the pickups (the latter tends to be a really bad kind of howl/screech though). The latter happens easier with single-coil pickups than with double since ...


2

Since you stretch your strings and would prefer not to have your guitar worked on at a shop, a quick fix would be a lubricant. Before the Floyd Rose tremolo system existed, lots of players would apply lubricants to the nuts of their guitars as needed. This allows the strings to slide through the nut when bent or when used heavily by a whammy bar. Van Halen ...


2

I've been going through the manual and the different settings of the Pod HD and I found out that you can change the output setting, depending on how you use it. My Pod was set on "Combo Front", which is good for amps but not really for direct recording. Changing the output mode to "Studio Direct" improved the sound quality significantly, which solves my ...


2

If you are willing to buy a book, this is the indispensable reference: http://www.danerlewine.com/guitar_repair_books.html The guy's a god, and it covers everything from how to string the instrument to insanely complex repairs like neck resets and fixing holes in the side...


2

To answer one of the sub-questions: The way you'd do it with an AD30, or other 2-channel amp, is to set one of the channels as distorted, the other as clean and then use the foot switch to toggle between them. One of the aspects that you have to finesse in this approach is achieving the desired relative overall volume between the two channels while ...


2

Truss rod adjustments do not usually affect the neck with an immediate change. Depending on the base wood, it could take 30 minutes to an hour before the truss rod has had it's full effect on the neck. My recommendation would be to wait 30 minutes to an hour and check again. If you feel you have made the proper adjustments, but your guitar neck is skill ...


2

First of all, if you have a choice (and why wouldn't you?), avoid an impedance mismatch. So my advice would be to get one more speaker, either 4 or 8 Ohms to get an impedance which you can match. Then you don't need to worry, and if your amp ever dies on you, you won't have that nagging feeling that you should have known better ... Having said that, and if ...


2

Don't. "Impedance" means that for any sinoid voltage applied to the terminals, the effective current will not exceed the one derived by Ohm's law. But it does not make any claim that the impedance will be constant over frequency, or that the phase of the current will be the same as that of the voltage. Amplifier standardize on the output voltage: how much ...


2

The instrument "electric guitar" does not end at the cable. A significant part of its sound and appeal comes afterwards, and there are a significant number of ways to play with that and combine and change stuff without endangering your instrument. Except, of course, for blowing an amp/tweeter/whatever. And most of the ways in which you can play in the ...


2

Short answer: No. Long answer: If you want to. As an example, take the popular British R&B guitarist Wilco Johnson. He has a guitar, a lead and a combo amp, and that's all he uses. Of course he tweaks his tone and his gain, but mostly the sound comes from his fingers. For other acts, virtuoso playing isn't their speciality -- coaxing interesting ...


1

An answer to "How to widen the groove on the nut" : 1) Read the other answers here warning you about what happens if you get it wrong (Tim & Dr Mayhem). If you still want to proceed .. 2) Remove strings - maybe you can just remove the relevant one but it's probably best to give yourself a bit of room so better to remove them all. 3) put a bit of ...


1

In my experience it is better to move the bridge tuners close to the top, i.e. the position where you can hardly tune down but you have the maximum range for tuning up. Then you tune the guitar properly using the machine heads, and then you lock the system. The reason is that the strings always get lower (i.e. they relax), you hardly ever need to tune them ...


1

Firstly, a pedal is nothing more than a preamplifier. A guitar amplifier also has a preamplifier. Both can produce distortion, and, at low volumes, this distortion is amplified more or less cleanly by the amplifier's power amp. The difference is that the pedal doesn't have the same tone as the pre-amp in the guitar amp. Furthermore, most pedals are simply ...


1

a lot of amps have two channels where you can set one for rhythm, and the other for lead, with a foot switch to flip between the two. It looks like the AD30 has that setup ? How you set the channels is up to you, of course. However there are other factors. Let's say you have your rhythm amp sound as clean with a little bit of 'crunch', and your lead sound ...


1

First port of call - Paul Reed Smith. He may well have seen the problem before. It makes life easier to slacken the strings before tightening the truss rod.While they're loose, try to turn another turn, you'll feel if it's binding or the thread has gone, more easily.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible