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15

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


8

The bass is normally tuned one octave lower than the guitar, therefore you can achieve the same frequency range by lowering the frequency by one octave. You can achieve this with any form of frequency shifting, like an octave pedal. You can then adjust the timbre to carve the sound towards a bass sound, like he is doing by routing the signal to a bass amp. ...


6

Moderate or Moderato is a convention from back before the invention and widespread use of the quartz-powered metronome. Tempo markings are a relatively recent invention, and they are used for their simplicity and accuracy. However, many composers choose to omit them because the "idea" of the tempo of the piece is more important than an absolute value. Other ...


4

The word Moderate indicates the name for the tempo; each tempo has a different name. Here is a list of the names: adagio: very slow. allegretto: fairly quick, slightly slower than allegro. allegro: lively, rather quick. andante: rather slow, at a moderate, walking pace. andantino: this used to mean a little slower than ...


4

(This is coming from the perspective of a classical pianist, not a pop/rock guitarist, so bear with me.) This is, as stated in some other answers, the correct, traditional way to practice. In many cases, the only way to gain the muscle-memory necessary to play fast passages is by repeatedly working them out very, very slowly. (Watch a video of, oh, say, Un ...


4

A seven string guitar might have longer scale length to accommodate lower tunings. A six stringed guitar can usually be made to handle B tuning, but there might be intonation issues, especially with Gibson measure, which is 24.75". If one wants to go lower, a longer scale is preferred. That can be another benefit with a seven string guitar. Seven string ...


4

I think your approach would work. If there is a slanted cabinet, you could put it on the side, to get more area for your combo. The question is if it is worth it. If there are slanted cabinets already (which is the usual setup if only one 4x12 is used), then you will get some sound projected towards your ears. Not as much as you would with the combo on top, ...


4

I would just like to point out something that has not been mentioned. Using a finger from your right hand (and no amplification on the guitar), hammer on to a note on the fretboard. Listen closely, and you will hear two distinct notes ringing out. One is the note you would expect to hear -- the fretted note. The other note is the portion of the string ...


3

When you state acoustic guitar, as long as you don't mean classical guitar, it's o.k. I have an Epiphone acoustic that has been strung in his way for 35+ yrs. No problem. I feel that 12s may be a little too heavy a gauge, I'd go for 10s or 11s, but a good move will be to check what gauge the existing strings are. Like for like will cause no problems, as the ...


3

Absolutely. There is no better way known to Man. It has always been the way. Folks these days are very lucky - they have the facility to slow tracks to whatever comfortable speed is needed, without changing the key. That's pretty important. When I was learning, we could slow the record player (remember them !) from 45 to 33, sometimes 16 rpm, but that ...


2

This is certainly the traditional way to practice, but you need to be aware that this method may not lead to the gain of the technique needed to play faster passages. Consider learning to run, for example - you cannot learn to run by just walking faster and faster, running is a fundamentally different technique. To apply to the guitar, consider what would ...


2

Yes, This is exactly how you should be doing it! I have been playing the guitar for over a decade now and took lessons all the way through my middle school and high school years. When ever I was learning a new song, a new scale or a new finger dexterity exercise my tutors would set the metronome at a slow tempo so I could focus on proper finger positioning ...


2

It's actually pretty pointless putting 'moderato' there, as a proper tempo is written. This gives exactly the speed of the piece, in beats per minute, each beat being shown as a crotchet.Back in the Classical days, composers would put the Italian words, which gave a rough to fairly good idea as to the pace of the piece. Nowadays, it's more usual to put the ...


2

I have my main gigging 7-string guitar tuned to A-D-A-D-G-B-E, which gives me the benefits of a normal Drop-D tuned 6 string, with a duplicated AD AD at the bottom end, which allows for some very full octave barre chords. Where this really comes into its own is three areas: Covering some of the bass range - when the bass is doing something else, I can ...


2

You have summed it up pretty well. Normally a 7 string guitar will have an extra low B string under the low E. This can be useful for rock and metal because you can add extra low metal tonalities to your power chords without having to tune your whole guitar lower. I'm primarily a jazz player and I have always wanted an extra high A string for better soloing ...


1

Is it an electric or acoustic guitar ? If acoustic : First is to get a reasonably microphone. this depends on your budget, and "you get what you pay for" right from a few tens of £ / $ up to hundreds or more. However there are two main types : Dynamic and Condenser. Dynamic microphones are generally good for picking up things relatively close by like a ...



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