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5

A jumbo fret is made with a thicker gauge wire, and consequently the top of the fret is further away from the fretboard. The claimed playing advantages are: you can get your fretting-hand fingers further down in the gap to the side of the string, allowing you to put sideward pressure on the string more easily. In other words : string-bending is easier! ...


5

Place a soft sponge between the body and the strings near the bridge, to eliminate even more sound. I caution that while it is OK to do that, you want to spend some time practicing where you can actually hear what you are doing. Further, if you are using headphones on a regular basis, be warned that you probably listen at a volume that can cause damage to ...


5

Did you not get the 10 Commandments with your new guitar, starting with 'Thou shalt spend inordinate amounts of time, effort and money etc ? Seriously, the search for the Holy Grail is what spurs most guitarists to spend. It's usually a special sound that exists in the guitarist's head and in reality in the fingers of his favourite player. If my wife needs ...


4

This depends on what you are satisfied with. If you are satisfied with the sound that the amp gives you, you don't need to change anything. You can play with that sound. Many people don't like the default sound, so they try to find some other sound. I, personally, think that it won't harm you to try to find some sound you like most. As a ...


4

Many folks keep some of their collectible guitars in display cases or guitar cabinets that may have a glass front to allow viewing of the instrument. However these cases should have a built in humidity control system as it is vitally important to maintain the proper level of relative humidity for your guitars. When storing guitars, one of the most ...


3

You need some sort of DAW on your computer, and an input device. I agree that you should not be going from the AUX output on your amp directly into your computer. I have an early version of the Line 6 POD (which you can now find used pretty cheap these days) and I love it for practicing guitar and not bothering anyone. I also have a home studio set up with ...


3

I would not recommend using the AUX output of your amp to record. Guitar > Guitar Cable > Audio Interface > Firewire > Laptop > (Guitar Rig Pro) > DAW..... Guitar rig pro / Amplitube are processing software that emulate amps and effects. Open it inside your DAW as a VST (and record it). This also gives you access to many amps for creativity purposes. As ...


3

I use a Behringer-ucg102 to connect my guitar to the computer, where the input is given to a track in my DAW(Reaper). The output can be heard by using the DAW's monitoring button for the track. I add another track which has the song/backing track on it. For guitar FX, I load the Guitar Rig/Amplitube VST for the track I'm monitoring. Now I can practice/record ...


3

Yes, you certainly can. But ideally you need a buffered AB/Y splitter or you may run into issues. Better yet, one with switches for ground loops etc. Basically, you can google any "ab/y splitter" and get whatever fits your price range, but most stuff will sound bad. Passive splitters will basically weaken your guitar's signal to each amp by half (or ...


3

Dependent as to how cold it may be, you could get in the car and drive to somewhere quiet (or noisy for that matter), park up and play in the back. If it's a left-hooker, then passenger seat may do.You could still use laptop and whatever, plugged into the car power. I suggested this to a drummer I work with, who has a young baby. He finds a corner of a ...


3

Could be feedback from speaker to guitar. There is acoustic feedback where the strings vibrate driven by the speakers, and magnetic feedback where the magnetic field from the speaker feeds directly into the pickups (the latter tends to be a really bad kind of howl/screech though). The latter happens easier with single-coil pickups than with double since ...


3

First of all, if you have a choice (and why wouldn't you?), avoid an impedance mismatch. So my advice would be to get one more speaker, either 4 or 8 Ohms to get an impedance which you can match. Then you don't need to worry, and if your amp ever dies on you, you won't have that nagging feeling that you should have known better ... Having said that, and if ...


2

Don't. "Impedance" means that for any sinoid voltage applied to the terminals, the effective current will not exceed the one derived by Ohm's law. But it does not make any claim that the impedance will be constant over frequency, or that the phase of the current will be the same as that of the voltage. Amplifier standardize on the output voltage: how much ...


2

The instrument "electric guitar" does not end at the cable. A significant part of its sound and appeal comes afterwards, and there are a significant number of ways to play with that and combine and change stuff without endangering your instrument. Except, of course, for blowing an amp/tweeter/whatever. And most of the ways in which you can play in the ...


2

Short answer: No. Long answer: If you want to. As an example, take the popular British R&B guitarist Wilco Johnson. He has a guitar, a lead and a combo amp, and that's all he uses. Of course he tweaks his tone and his gain, but mostly the sound comes from his fingers. For other acts, virtuoso playing isn't their speciality -- coaxing interesting ...


2

I can relate to your concern. I had the same problem when I lived with a roommate who felt the need to sleep while I felt the need to practice. Now I live alone so I can play as loud as I want whenever I want. Sounds like you've tamed the majority of sound by playing through headphones. If you are using a solid body guitar, that is about as quiet as you ...


2

It's difficult to measure 'harshness', as it's a relative thing, and also perceived differently from one person to another. But, it's related to the amount of treble in a sound. So one person may hear a sound but not pick up all the higher frequencies that are in it. Think dog whistle and humans, or that high pitched noise that was experimented with to ...


2

Honestly, if you want to play high gain stuff, it's all in the pickup. Get yourself a cheap guitar and then upgrade it with the top of the line bridge pickup of your choice (the pickup will set you back $60-150 if you can handle a soldering Iron yourself). You are looking for a high gain pickup of brands like Seymour Duncan (very popular is the SH-6), ...


2

I used IK Multimedia amp modelling for a few years. The amp sims are top notch, but even so, I found differences in guitars that I used. I started with a Mexican Squier Telecaster with single-coil pickups. Although I was able to conjure up some decent lead tones, the overall tone was thin, no matter how I adjusted the eq. etc. Then I tried an Ibanez ...


2

There are many ways to accomplish what you want to do - silent monitoring with headphones and recording of your guitar on computer. The Line 6 Pod systems as mentioned by manejar are great. Another option that should work would be a simple audio interface such as this one PreSonus AudioBox USB which has two line inputs for guitar or mic, a headphone ...


2

I use a Line6 POD UX2, which plugs into my computer. I can plug headphones into it (via an adapter) or I can plug my amp into it. Then I use the free Line6 PodFarm software in which I can add FX and create tones for my guitar. That software doesn't record, but you can change the input on different software (I use Propellerhead Reason or Adobe Audition, but ...


1

Unless you are building a sealed case like a humidor, the construction material matters very little. All you should concern yourself with is whether the structure can support the weight of your guitars (and then some). Environmental considerations are addressed in this answer.


1

How much does the quality of my electric guitar actually matter now? Define your expectations. Find out exactly what you are trying to accomplish. Many people obsess about the quality of the build and focus on the brand name. What makes a great guitar is not always the sum of the parts, sometimes it is the feel. If I pick up another $99 Squier or ...


1

I believe the key lies in "good enough", something other answers are also touching on. Get a sound that you are comfortable with and use that. Experiment with new stuff if you like from time to time. The trap many people seem to fall into is trying to achieve the dream sound, which might not exist. Perfect is certainly the enemy of good in these cases, as ...


1

A magnetic sound hole pickup for acoustic guitar reproduces sound waves in exactly the same way that a magnetic pick up on an electric guitar does. It uses magnets to pick up the vibration of the strings and translates that through an electrical signal sent to the amplifier which sends those vibrations to the speaker in the amp or PA speaker. There are ...



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