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24

The direct answer: No, this is not good teaching There is very little difference between electric and acoustic guitar. Playing all 6 strings can be absolutely fine on either. Many barre chords are 6 string. The question should really be "...shouldn't play all 6 strings together when using distortion" When you use distortion you add in harmonics which ...


17

When you're dead. Seriously, though. Pick up that guitar. You're already better than the guy who didn't.


11

very simple answer... E-Bow I've had one for 30 years, there's nothing quite like it, but it is a technique in & of itself. You can do the standard 'never-ending note' by simply holding it over a string & sliding/hammering up & down the fretboard, but with a little practise you can make it sound like violin/cello spiccato by banging the string ...


10

The very first thing to know, is to Never assume there is a certain rule you should or should not apply, of course some ways are better than others, but you can do and experiment everything you want, in music only comes to the ear is what matters. In case you have heard AC/DC songs before, "Highway To Hell" for example, open chords are played, they thing ...


9

The only rule is, "If it sounds good, it is good."


7

The important part of a violin sound is a gentle attack at the start of each note. Some players use a volume or swell pedal to achieve this: the note is played just as the pedal swells the volume in. Others use the volume pot on the guitar. Strats and Teles are quite easy to do this on, as the knob is close to where the string is picked. Again, the string is ...


7

Pick the one that you will have most use for. To use the classical guitar as a stepping stone to electric guitar, which many do, is an overrated approach in my mind. (I did this myself, since that's how it was done in school). Playing techno on a nylon acoustic sounds like a stretch, so that would imply an electric guitar. I assume it's monetary reasons ...


6

I started learning guitar at 35. At 37 I started playing professionally. It's not talent, it's not age, it's simply focused, consistent practice. Yeah, you may never be as good as you would have been if you started with guitar at 6. So what? Music isn't a contest, it's a way of living.


6

It's quite common that people are worried about starting an instrument because they think they are too old. I thought I was too old to learn guitar at 15 as lots of my friends were amazing by then. A lot of musicians start young but remember: They have more free time, Parents see it a worthy activity, etc. It's not because of a 'critical point'. ...


6

You can't just use an adapter to plug your guitar directly into your laptop -- the laptop's sound card is expecting either mic-level or line-level sound, whereas your guitar is a very high impedance signal coming in at a very low level (particularly if your pickups are passive). It's possible that your adapter is just faulty, but it's far more likely that ...


6

when I plug the cable almost halfway of the adapter's body I can hear sound when I play Sounds like (haw!) a mono-to-stereo problem. Look at the 1/4 inch plug. How many parts? The tip connector and the sleeve right behind the tip? Now look at the 1/8 inch plug. Two sleeves? If yes, you are shorting out one of the channels. Go back to the shop and look ...


5

If you can play the parts on the unwound high E string, you can use a fiddle bow, as Jimmy Page did. Just remember to rosin the bow and use a cheap one as the guitar strings are hard on the horsehair. Another alternative is the Electro Harmonix SuperEgo which will allow you to adjust the attack (Gliss) as well as the sustain ("Speed"); Yet another ...


5

You should find out if it's your ears or your equipment. This could be done by taking your guitar to a music store and try it with some device that supports headphones, like the one below (there are other brands). That will bring the room out of the picture. If you don't feel pain, then one solution is to get one of those devices and practice with it instead ...


5

No, it's never too late to start with anything! People start playing music at the age of 50 and have 10 years of experience at the age of 60. Music has no age limit! It's for anyone, no matter what color, age, sex, ... Trust me, you'll love it!


5

Although much of what I play might be more suited stylistically to an acoustic guitar than an electric, I much prefer playing my electric guitars with the neck pickup and a clean amp, to playing my acoustic. The guitar I play the most is a Fender Squier Bullet, purchased new on sale for US$100 (regularly $150 MSRP); it has height adjustments for the ...


4

To become a virtuouso there's likely a due date somewhere along the line. At a certain age there will be enough ailments to effectively stop you from learning. Apart from that it will most likely be worth it, and that goes even if you won't be able to match your friend's abilities. It's not a race, and to me a lot of the best stuff doesn't come from the ...


4

I would say there's never been a better time to learn guitar. There are tons of resources available online including instructional videos from YouTube. I am over 45 and have only been learning for six months. With less than an hour of practice a day (and even missing a few days), its definitely been interesting as there is always tons of stuff to learn. ...


4

Well, I don't see it as a key difference between electric and acoustic since I am not overly fond of just hitting all six on the acoustic either. And when playing the acoustic, I don't even have to share sound texture between lead and rhythm guitar. On the other hand: how are you going to start off "A Hard Day's Night" without playing all six? It's right ...


4

No reason. The power amps mainly boost the sound coming from the pre-amps. So they can be swapped. Why you need 350 watts for foldback is a question, unless you're playing 1,000+ venues or out in the open. Why haven't you just tried the idea?


4

Two basic philosophies. First is, set everything at 12 o'clock (halfway) and adjust everything up or down until it sounds right. Second is, dime everything (all the way) and back things down until it sounds right. If it doesn't already. There are other things to consider. A common metal thing is to max the bass and treble and pull back on ("scoop") the ...


4

A good amp, apart from sounding good, should have a long life before it. So check all the controls: do they make a solid impression? Do the pots move smoothly, nothing is loose, and nothing makes noises it shouldn't? If every change in settings comes with its own sequence of "snap, crackle, pop", then this won't get better over time. How much noise does ...


3

That principle stems from the fact that electric guitars, in a band setting, share frequencies (specifically mids) with a lot of other instruments. It's right up there with the piano, keys, vocals, even some horns and of course, with other guitars. So it is encouraged that as electric guitar, you should play differently i.e, find variations when playing ...


3

With e.g. a Roland GR-55 guitar synth and special pickup GK-3 you can get semi-convincing violin and cello sounds. Using midi you can connect to a e.g. a DAW and likely get vastly superior results through sound libraries. Not the cheapest solution, but probably closest to the real thing. Could be considered cheating though...


3

The EMF won't do any damage to the pickups (or the amp, for that matter... one of the longer-remaining applications of tubes outside music was in military electronics, because unlike solid-state elements, tubes hardly bother about the electromagnetic pulse of a nuclear bomb until they're melted by the heat. And the speakers are driven by the tubes, which ...


3

Won't harm the pickups. Just watch your amps. That kind of sparc noise smokes through tweeters at volumes that you'd consider way on the harmless side.


3

I am nearing 40 and just started playing the guitar. I was a fan of music but never wanted to try it out myself. The liking to experiment began after purchasing a guitar for my son who is in his primary level. Afterwards, I feel like it change my lifestyle and the way I look at things. Having said, that I believe, that there is not any age limit to learn ...


3

To me it has mainly to do with the amount of gain. One other important factor is midrange. The sound of Satisfaction is comparably low in gain, and has some nice bite in the mids. If you compare to e.g. Santana, who could be considered to have a creamy solo sound, he has quite a lot of gain, and not so much midrange. Playing on the neck pickup will produce ...


3

I often find myself playing all six strings on electric. More than I should, even. I was listening to a Nile Rodgers tutorial the other day, and he talked about hearing cover bands play good times, hitting a lot of strings, and he says "No! I didn't play it like that! I played it like this!". It's hard to tell the difference, because he's talking and you ...


2

Well it sounds like the amp is the problem. If you've tried sitting in different positions and distances from the amp, in different rooms, different pickups, different channels, and you haven't had the problem sitting right next to a different amp or with an acoustic, I can't see what the problem could be. Ask other people what they think, it might not be ...


2

What does "too old" mean in the context of picking up a guitar? Are you afraid it will leave you for a younger player? Maybe it will. My violin most certainly did that a few times already. At any rate, I consider it more important having a contingency plan for being alive than having one for being dead. Because the latter case tends to have others take ...



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