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10

They are indeed called horns. In the 60s/70s, Burns made some electric guitars called Black Bison, I seem to remember,and the horns did resemble those of a bison.The cutaway is necessary to reach higher frets, but if the horns were removed as well, the balance of the instrument would be compromised even more. Besides which,as you say, most manufacturers need ...


8

Sometimes it's just the color of the case, the branding (Bass Fuzz X28-B instead of just Fuzz X28), and the marketing ("As seen in Bass Magazine!"). If it goes beyond that, well obviously bass effects are designed to handle a wider range of frequencies, especially those below the normal range of a guitar. In addition to an overall wider frequency response, ...


4

I empathise with you. For years, I played like that. Each solo was learned individually. Then it was realised that some players tended to use the same set of notes in a lot of their solos. For instance, pentatonic minor. Once it was realised that the sound of that scale was distinctive, I could recognise the sound of the same set of notes in other solos.So, ...


4

While any latency does upset the feedback loop between ears-brain-fingers, you can of course work around this through practice. You could probably become proficient without being able to hear the sounds at all. Sure, it could slow down learning until your brain has come to terms with the latency delay, but as you still have the physical touch feedback from ...


4

They're called horns: The indentations next to them (beside the neck) are referred to as cutouts or cutaways, and are usually more often what is referenced in relation to the general shape of a guitar body. In the image I've provided, the guitar is a single cutaway, and the image you have shown is a double cutaway.


3

Adding to Todd's answer - the bass chorus in particular.My Boss (others are available - but not necessarily with this feature!) has a 'low filter' facility. This specifically applies the chorus effect to just the upper frequencies if required, which cuts out the muddiness produced when low frequency notes have a chorus effect used on them. Subtle, but ...


3

You have a few issues there. I'll go for the obvious ones: you are taking too much time to change notes you are stopping a note before you play the next one you aren't using a compressor Practice sorts out those first two - timing your pick hand and fretting hand will make a major difference. Slash plays some notes as hammer-ons and pull-offs as well. A ...


2

He uses various muting types. You have spotted the thumb muting, which is very effective He also mutes with the first three fingers of his right hand (most of his plucking is done with the first two so the third is used a lot in this respect) Mark also uses left hand damping, where he slightly releases pressure on the strings Right hand palm heel muting is ...


2

What you're asking is not too clear. However, if you want or need to faithfully reproduce a solo, the best way is to listen to it many, many times, and try to copy it exactly.Even considering the tone, effects used, etc. It will depend on how good a player you are and how experienced you are as to how well that works, and how long it takes. If it's for a ...


1

The best way to learn a solo depends on your current ability and your preferred learning style. Since I don't know either as it relates to you, allow me to offer what I personally do when learning a solo. I perform mostly covers either solo or as part of a duo or full band. When covering a solo, my goal is to play something that the audience will ...


1

When initially learning, or if trying to play an exact cover, you will want to copy the artist's style, and try to learn it note for note, including all nuances. Once you can confidently play a range of pieces, you will realise you are developing your own quirks and style, and you'll probably change notes, licks, bends and timing. If it is painful, you may ...


1

It would sound familiar. He was probably playing the notes from the pentatonic scales. There are two, both containing the same notes. Let's take those notes in the key of C. C, D, E, G and A. Thus missing out the B and F from the full C maj. scale. They all sound fine, played in any order, partly because the 'avoid' notes of B and F don't get played. ...


1

There are many causes to poor intonation A bent neck. A twisted neck. The guitar saddle can be on a bad angle or height for the specific string. The most common type of guitar for this is a Stratocaster since the there is a mini saddle for each individual string. Dints between each frett from old age. Concaves on the fretboard is a common cause for old ...


1

Well you could easily plug-in and play your guitar through your computer. Things you need to get this done are : A USB guitar link : A USB interface for your guitar . This helps connecting your guitar with the computer . There are many good quality and cheap USB guitar links available online so getting one is easy, DAW Software (Digital Audio Workstation ...


1

99 percent of the time, it's a guitar issue. best bet is to pull out the electronics, (not difficult) and check your ground wires. very common problem with "beginner guitars" cheap wires and no shielding. I use old coax cable or such, with the copper braiding. replace the ground line to your output jack and pow! no more ground noise. 99.99% guaranteed ...



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