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12

Piezo-electric transducers lurking under the saddles on the bridge! just like acoustic guitars have possessed for ages. Now bassists have the opportunity to use this technology. It's not new, but quite new on basses. Next may be a 'hybrid' with standard pups and p-e ts.


12

There are mainly three factors to this: Powerful speakers need (or at least used to need) heavy magnets. Lightweight cabinets tend to be less “acoustically stable” than heavy ones. And more easily damaged when handled roughly. 50 Hz transformers need a lot of windings around fat iron cores. (Plus, tube amps also need output transformers. And, ...


8

It has been done, in several different pickup designs. These are called hexaphonic pickups, meaning "six separate sounds" or six audio signals, one for each string by itself. There were a couple of commercial products offered in the last ten years or so by Gibson Guitars and Keith McMillen Instruments that did exactly what you are looking for, but they are ...


7

Would having the delay after the cab sim ruin it? No Would it sound different if the delay was in the effects loop? It depends. It depends on what kind of delay you are using and how it is changing the audio besides the actual delay portion. The power amp and speaker (or cab sim) in a guitar amp are kinda like an effect, sort of like a fixed EQ and ...


7

As well as the in-bridge piezo pickups (either for acoustic tones or MIDI, which is what the Variax guitars use to feed the modelling system), there is a relatively rare second option: hidden pickups. The "Type I" Fender Marauder, for example, had magnetic pickups concealed under the pick guard:


6

You could bend the 22nd fret up a whole step. You could use a slide, ring, maybe even a fingernail to "fret" it in approximately the right place (compression or distortion would help and you should use vibrato to hide the inevitably poor intonation). You can try sliding the first string down off the edge of the fret board so it both stretches and "frets" ...


6

A simplified picture of how an electric pickup works is that: the magnet in the pickup induces the string (steel/nickel alloy) to be a magnet itself. When you pluck the, string, the magnetized string moves relative to the coils in the pickup. Moving a magnet near a circuit causes a voltage across the circuit (or equivalently a current for a closed ...


5

Well, use a harmonic. Two octaves up means that you can touch either at 3/4 of the string length (meaning that you can just use a harmonic where the 24th fret would be) or at 1/4 of the string length. The "natural" note at 1/4 of the string length corresponds to the 12*log(3/4)/log(1/2)th fret. Which happens to be quite close to the 5th fret. But unless ...


5

A superstrat is any guitar that is basically like a strat but has upgrades and extra features. Typical upgrades that make a guitar a superstrat include: Upgraded tremolo (technically vibrato) unit - Floyd Rose is common Upgraded electronics/pickups - HSH with coil tap is popular Upgraded tonewoods - the body might be more of a Les Paul body made from ...


4

You'll probably want one made for the bridge in the bridge. Near the bridge the strings don't vibrate as widely so won't induce as much signal. To compensate bridge pickups are generally "hotter" than neck/middle pickups. That means the bridge pickups generally have more windings around the magnets which means more current induced in the wire, which would ...


4

I'm quite confident that changing pickups (PU's) will make a big difference. It would only be a total waste if it already had original USA fender PU's in it and you just didn't know. If it doesn't, it will not be a total waste, the sound WILL change with different PU's. However, will it give you what you want? That's a different question. What do you ...


4

You'll have to do a full bend (a bend of a whole step) up to the note on the 22 fret to get that note. You could also theoretically get that note off the harmonics on the 5 fret.


3

I used to associate quality = mass for most things, including PA systems and (tube-powered) guitar amps. Now that I'm my 50's I've looked for ways to get that sound without so much weight, and thankfully, new neodymium magnets have helped a lot. My current favourite is a Hughes & Kettner Combo 18. At 21 lbs it is easy on my back, but a monster for ...


3

Yeah, Frank Gambale! I listened to the first vid and was like, "wow, this guy would love Gambale..." lol. So, getting more specific and answering your (admittedly) very broad question: Harmony/Changes These guys are playing with the changes. That's because this isn't really pure "funk"(), it's fusion, which is really jazz with a rock beat (IMHO, don't ...


3

It's 40 plus years since I played electric with a wound 3rd, but a plain is easier to bend. The core isn't the be-all and end-all, as tension is less in a plain string. The 3rd is a string that gets used a lot in bends, also, a plain is slightly better to slide up or down a fret or two. As mentioned in another answer, we used to use banjo strings or a second ...


3

I'm used to the first couple frets being sharp so I'm not sure why yours are flat, but otherwise it's very common. It's pretty much impossible for a fretted instrument to have perfect intonation - it's always a compromise. Since it's an electric guitar, you can individually adjust the intonation of each string any time you want. This is done at the bridge ...


3

You should go to a professional guitar repair technician or luthier. They can look at it and give you a quick assessment of what is probably wrong for no charge. I would guess that the nut of the guitar, and the string slots, are cut wrong. Modifying the nut and fret slots, or replacing the nut entirely and then hand-cutting the fret slots, is not a very ...


3

The term "Bass VI" applies to the Music Man Silhouette Baritone Bass. The Bass VI name comes from the Fender Bass VI introduced in 1961 before "normal" six string basses existed (or at least were widely known). At least some other makers, e.g. Eastwood t (Sidejack Bass VI) and Schecter (Hellcat vi), have adopted this naming. This is one of those cases ...


2

In the 80s, guitarists started experimenting with electronics, pickups (e.g. active pickups) and bridges (think the Floyd Rose) or scalloped fretboards to allow for easier access to extended techniques. The Stratocaster being often the starting base, the result was called a "Super Strat". In a way, the evolution of Superstrats is symbiotic with the rise of ...


2

You could use pinched harmonics which might make it easier (after much practice) to play the note as part of a melody. A melody of all harmonics will sound more fluid than many fretted notes with just a few harmonics (although that can also sound cool). You can find this note by fretting the 12th fret and pinching at the (would-be) 24th fret, or by fretting ...


2

I have to disagree with Wilbur Whateley: Yes, this would most likely be a total waste. Pickups do make a big contribution to the guitar sound, sure. However, they do not generate any sound as such, they just – well – pick up what the body and strings can offer. If this is garbage to begin with, the best thing a pickup can do is cut away much of ...


1

First I would say try a more rounded pick and see if it helps you achieve the sound you want. I personally never got used to the pointy edge of a jazz III. For a thick rounder pick I'd recommend tortex .88 It might help, and if it doesn't you only spend 50 cents!. Secondly, the absolutely hands down best way to improve the "sound production" aspect of ...


1

What makes even a relatively small amp (like a 50W $2000 Mesa) so heavy (~25kg) and how is this linked to quality? Those amps use cast frame speakers, specifically an OEM variant of the Electro-Voice EV12L, which is probably the second loudest and second heaviest guitar speaker in the history of time (the JBL F120 is a bit louder and heavier). Heavy ...


1

Many years of being a guitar picker,one thing I will state, if you buy a new guitar and it plays good but on the first change of the strings you begin to notice detuning ,most guitar pickers after many years of picking don't know.If the guitar was set up with light weight or what ever gauge strings from the factory and you change the strings to a different ...


1

Keyboard amps and Electronic Drum Amps will work fine for bass. They both produce frequencies in the same range that a bass does. I'll leave the discussion of guitar amps and hifi's to what has already been contributed.


1

It really depends on what sound you're looking for. I changed pickups in my Tele and made a huge difference in sound. Gone from country to rock with the pickup. The pickups make a huge difference in sound. Why do you think there are so many on the market and types. Choose one pickup to change and get a feel for the sound of it. Look at Dimarzio website ...



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