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8

Check the neck for bowing, twisting, and any other defect. Also check the action on the neck. Check play every fret on each string and be sure that they all ring purely and that they don't squeak out. Check if the frets are worn down, which could cause squeaking. Check the intonation (play a harmonic on the 12th fret, then play the same string with the ...


7

Of course, it is a matter of taste. You're correct that a chorus creates multiple “voices”, but actually that's a good reason to put it after distortion! For distortion is nonlinear, which means that if you put in a combination of multiple voices, the result will be different from when you put each voice individually through distortion and mix ...


5

In addition to the points given by topo morto: the effect that gives you pretty much “overdrive without the distortion” is a compressor. In fact, a major reason for using overdrive and distortion is that it compresses the signal (yielding longer sustain), as well as changing the sound by adding harmonics and intermodulation. If you simply run a ...


5

The dirt and grime that comes from distortion is a result of notes with frequency relationships beyond those that are very simple ratios (e.g. 2:1=an octave, and 3:2=a fifth) going through the distortion process together. This results in sum and difference frequencies being produced that seem only distantly related to the notes being played, resulting in an ...


5

The standard advice is: all modulation and delay based effects after distortion. The reason is that the distortion makes the created effect muddy and too dirty. If you talk about "multiple voices" then these would get mixed up in a rather dissonant way by the harmonics added by the distortion. In this case most people would prefer to have the distortion ...


5

There are a few things you might not be able to check easily when you go to see it: Whether the truss rod works. Even if the action and setup seem perfect, do you know that the neck's truss rod will respond properly when you change to heavier strings, or decide that you want to play with a higher or lower action? Whether the guitar picks up electrical ...


5

Your suspicion is correct -- that's not set up properly. If you take off the rectangular back panel of your guitar, you should see a number of springs that connect the metal block underneath your tremolo bridge to a "claw" piece that is screwed into the body of the guitar. These springs should fully counteract the tension created by the strings on the other ...


4

Why would you think you need a Y-cable for this? Each of the M-Track's inputs is mono, so it's no use to feed them a stereo signal. If you tried this with an unbalanced input, like in a guitar amp, you'd get only the left channel from the Y cable, because only the tip of the 1/4" is considered: the ring is either left open, or even short to the grounded ...


4

Ebow. It is called ebow. I must write 30 characters.


4

Snapping strings has nothing to do with using a trem. A trem in the right position, will let you tune your strings quite happily to the right notes, so you have a separate problem here Aside from raising the trem up to gain more upwards movement, what else have you done? Are your tension springs in the same place, and is the tension bar screwed in the same ...


3

Two contrary ways to do this is: Don't use much distortion, if any, and just use medium gain with overdrive Use a metal pedal that doesn't require too much gain: simple square wave distortion can be quite clean But you will need to provide the effect with a clean input, so no barre chords or open chords. Just stick to thirds and fifths, which sound ...


3

Some suggestions from my personal experience: Make sure you spend enough time doing warm-up exercises. I found that if I try to play too fast too soon, it will hurt either immediately or after practice. You should also make sure you are relaxed when you are playing. Too much tension will increase fatigue and prevent you from playing faster. Finally, try ...


3

Some established el. guitar designs have certain characteristics that makes them more suitable to certain genres generally speaking. Here are some examples: Twin-humbucker Les Pauls are generally quite high-output and full sounding, making them rather rock and heavy rock orientated. Fender Telecasters have a distinct nasal twang that has long been ...


2

Who told you you can't use you home PA? Sure enough, if you just plug the guitar right in a PA, it'll sound somewhat boring, but there's no reason you could not do it anyway. In fact, such a “super-clean” sound can IMO sometimes be a pleasant alternative. The thing is, guitar amps aren't designed to sound “good” in a HiFi sense, at ...


2

A tube power amplifier (like the final stage in your Mark V) has to have an output transformer to lower the output impedance (the "Ohms") to a level appropriate to drive a speaker. What does that mean? Well if you know what voltage and current and power are, then one way to look at impedance is how much of the power you are putting out is in voltage and how ...


2

This is an incomplete list. Please edit it to add extra models/styles! Roughly ordered historically, by first appeareance of the type: Lap steel guitars, apart from being a clichee of Hawaii sound, are mostly found in countless country songs. Their particular twang-slide sound, often in thirds and fourths, is very distinctive even in comparison with other ...


2

If we separate out the effects you could see, The body/neck wood could absorb energy from the strings, causing the sound to decay faster (and with preference for certain frequencies) The body/neck wood could then retransmit energy back into the strings, again possibly with preference for certain frequencies due to resonances in the wood The body/neck ...


2

You seem to have done a little research on what the particular model Fender Guitar in question should sell for. And from your question, it appears that you have some concerns about why this one seems to have been on the market for some time. While the other answers offer good general advice about assessing the condition of a particular guitar, my answer ...


1

Slow down. Picking that fast requires extreme accuracy, so concentrate on getting your playing comfortable at slower speeds. Use a metronome and gradually speed up. The way you are describing your physical pain you should relax and take it easy. Everyone had to put in long hours to achieve fast speeds.


1

Seriously, go nuts with it. This is how players like Eddie Van Halen got their sound. You might break a string here and there, but look into string brands that are made for this kind of treatment. You can do really cool things with this, too. Once I broke a string, so I just took the entire whammy bar, put it all the way down, and put it under all of the ...


1

You can go down until the strings are totally relaxed without any problem. Going up is quite tough on the strings, so it's up to you how much "risk" you're ready to take. Usually such systems are indeed set up such that you can go up by something between a whole tone step and a major third (on the high strings). So what you can break are your strings (by ...


1

It really is down to taste, personally I find that it works better after distortion, I'd usually have an effect such as chorus early on in the chain, purely out of the habit of having the effects I turn off less earlier on in my chain (again, it's just a preference, and I use a lot more "clean" tones than you might.) The only correct answer is to what you ...


1

I would like to this add up to Mark's and the other's answers as a comment but I dont have the rep for it :) My addition is: Check all frets for chocking, it might be due to a faulty neck or due to a bad setup. So check the neck straight down and see if it seems reasonable, eg if bended backwards it would make sense that first frets might chock but if the ...


1

The answer is "yes", because virtually every part of an electric guitar affects the quality of the sound to some degree. Electric guitarists agree that the selection of woods in the body, neck and fingerboard make significant differences in timbre (the distinguishing characteristics of the tone and sound). (When we talk about the characteristics of the ...


1

The wood used in a electric guitar will add body to the pure vibrating string sound. My luthier once told me that the wood you use is like a landscape and the pickups are like windows through which you observe it. If the landscape has some beautiful sections, but your window can only let you see the ugly portions of it, you have a problem. The strings are ...


1

I have through trial and error, learned a few things about enhancing the audio for a video of myself playing guitar. And here is what I have learned. If you record the video and audio at separate times, it is very difficult to synchronize, even if you played to the same drum track each time or lip synced to the audio recording. I have tried to lip sync ...


1

For rerecording, start by clapping your hands once visibly at the start and the end of the recording. It's the cheap version of a clapperboard. It also makes sense to let the video camera record audio. It's pretty much guaranteed to be synchronous to the video and is thus perfect for realigning with the high quality audio recording. Just make double sure ...


1

The only way to constantly improve is to spend time with musicians with skills at a level higher than yourself (unless you are a prodigy) because any source can only teach you so much. The most reliable way to do this is with a teacher. When you feel like you are not learning you need to move to something / someone else. Basically, your requirements and ...


1

The M-Audio M-Track is a computer interface to allow you to input audio and instrument signals into your computer. The Digitech RP500 is a multi-effects processor for guitar - which also provides for input of the processed signal into your computer. The Digitech RP500 provides for the output to be summed as a mono signal and sent to a guitar amplifier, ...


1

You can use a stereo and speakers. The reasons people tend to use instrument amps for practice is because they are (hopefully) built to cope with an uncompressed/unEQ'd instrument signal, which will have more big level spikes at particular frequencies, in contrast to recorded music which tends to be more smoothed out (making it more obvious when you're ...



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