Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Guitars are already rich in overtones and harmonics. Experiment with the position of your right hand. Picking near the neck emphasises the fundamental frequency. Picking nearer the bridge brings out more overtones. The biggest differences between a guitar and a violin are the size of the instrument, and the fact that a violin is bowed. You could try ...


5

Slim's answer already covers some of this, but I just want to emphasize how massively rich in overtones any guitar is. Only a pure sine wave doesn't have overtones, any natural instrument is rich in them (in fact each overtone is a sine wave). The only spectral difference between a violin and a guitar lies in which overtones are most present, and what their ...


5

Overdriven, distorted guitar sounds contain loads of harmonics, and tend to emphasise them quite well. By experimenting with these sorts of sounds, along with different pup settings, and plucking in different places on your strings, you may come close.Valve amps do it better, but there are several pedals also.


3

This is way old but I want to comment because I'm a massive Dire Straits fan. I started out my guitar playing career working on Sultans of Swing from videos on the internet. I play finger style, no pick, so it was hard to get both the right picking action and the left hand movements. Because I started with a song I know so well, backwards and forwards, I can ...


2

Yes, you will need to set it up again. There are two essential reasons for any guitar -- bow, and intonation. (For those with tremolo bridges, other responses have already addressed that.) Bow: The string gauge effectively determines the total tension on the guitar neck, when the string are tuned to pitch. (Note that this affects those who change tunings ...


2

I would also question the assertion that heavier strings --in and of themselves-- increase sustain. Indeed they have more mass --which implies more inertia to keep the string moving. But this ignores or discounts the opposing tensile force of the string material itself which resists stretching from resting to extended position as the string vibrates. So, ...


2

Depends entirely on your taste in music, I'd suggest trying to learn a piece you know and like. Of course you could always work out some arpeggios or something you like the sound of. I think this was the first song I learned using the technique: Minus the Bear - Absinthe Party at the Fly Honey Warehouse


1

DR strings are hands down the best strings for metal. Several different types of DR's, but they are all great. Strings actually do make a fairly big difference in sound, and playability.


1

If you are familiar with - a special kind of - programming, you can use something like Pure Data or Max MSP. Pure Data (PD), for example, is an open source, visual programming environment for manipulating streams of data like audio (or video). With PD you are able to build your own individual FX chains or use community contributed patches (In PD speech ...


1

You should understand that Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits uses a playing technique that is quite out of the ordinary for electric guitarists. He does not strum or play solos with a guitar pick, not ever. He plays "fingerstyle", in a fashion similar to that used by classical guitarists. He plays all his guitar parts by alternating strokes between the thumb, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible