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15

From a sound design / sound engineer context As an effect, distortion is any process that alters the sound in the harmonic (tone, timbre) domain. Overdrive is a type of distortion. It is achieved by saturating (overdriving) the valves in an amplifier (or a simulation of this dynamic). In that context, overdrive is a subset of distortion. From a guitar ...


8

TL;DR Which is better? That's up to your ears. Both bypasses have trade-offs: True Bypass is the most pure and high-fidelity, but it exposes your signal to long-cable degradation (plus it's more expensive). Pedals with buffered bypass will color your tone (especially if you have many of them), but you can run long cables without worry. More explanation ...


8

The signal between an electric guitar and a guitar amp is called a signal voltage. The voltage in the line oscillates in a manner analogous to the strings' vibrations, summed. The level of the voltage is dependent on lots of things including string material, how much energy is in the strings, and the electronics of the guitar. There is no specific standard, ...


8

Yes, you can use thinner gauged strings to reduce tension and make the strings easier to bend. For electric guitar strings, the standard is usually around .009 or .010 inches for the high-E string (Sets are usually labelled by the gauge of the high-E string. The gauges of the rest of the set mostly depend on how thick the high-E is, but there are also ...


7

Effects are usually a relatively personal topic among guitar players, so you will probably get a lot of variation among answers to this question. I can give my opinion on the matter but it's always best to experiment yourself and figure out what you like the sound of. Generally I use an overdrive/distortion, a fuzz pedal, and a delay pedal for my ...


7

There is no specific combination of wood types that make a guitar more or less appropriate for rock/metal music. Essentially all combinations can and have been used to good effect by various artists in these genres. Other features besides the type wood are likely to have a more significant effect on the the behaviour of the guitar; at most you could ...


7

The line between Blues, Rock and Metal can be "fuzz"ier than you'd think. Effects can be broken up into three classes: Gain, Modulation and Time (GMT), and roughly, they are placed in the chain in this order. (If you place things out of this order and like the sound, you are under no requirement to change.) In the Gain section, Distortion occurs when the ...


5

The bypass jack bypasses the switch on the pedal so you when you engage the tuner you don't cut the signal. In a live situation you are usually going to want to be silent when you tune, so you should use the regular output to your amp/effects. Only use bypass if you want the signal to be heard even when you are tuning. This might be useful at home so you can ...


5

Basically you use the boost pedal any time you need an extra bit of volume to stand out. Typically this is during a guitar solo, but yes, sometimes it is also useful in a song's chorus if the whole band picks up the energy a bit. But as with all effects, use your ears as a guide. Obviously you don't want to use it all the time, but for certain moments in a ...


5

This has become a particularly heated area of debate recently on the internet, but personally I think a lot of it is blown way out of proportion. Basically, a lot of older effects pedals (and most current Boss ones) were always "buffered" or non-true bypass. What this means is that even when the effect pedal is off, your guitar's signal is still going ...


4

There is a good article here; Signal To Noise: The Sonic Diary Of The Smashing Pumpkins. To summarise the key points: Amp: Early-80s Marshall JCM-800 2203 (KT88 tubes) through 1960A cabinets Pedals: Corgan achieved Siamese Dream’s highly stylized tone with a litany of DOD pedals and a ’70s-era, silver-faced Big Muff Pi Guitar: As the guitar ...


4

Electric guitar sound is affected, among other things, by the way the wood absorbs the vibrations of the strings. The sustain and the brightness of the sound comes, in part, from the wood used. Availability, workability and visual properties are also important. The most popular rock guitars are Fender Stratocaster and Gibson Les Paul. Strat bodies are ...


4

There's one more important thing the answers so far haven't mentioned: a pickup's output signal doesn't follow the string movement simply in a linear fashion, but in a rather complex relation depending on inhomogenity of the magnetic field, coil geometry etc., and the closer you get the more nonlinear. The result is somewhat similar to a gentle but very ...


3

Best advise I can give is to think about which artist exemplifies any given genre in your mind and research his setup. An often overlooked item is a graphic equalizer placed after a run of the mill distortion box. By cutting or boosting certain frequencies post distortion you can traverse between many classic rock and metal sounds. As an aside, the term ...


3

In general, smaller-gauged strings will come up to the same pitch at a lower tension. They're easier to bend. They'll also have less "oomph" as a consequence, but amplification can mitigate some loss of volume. As for technique, you want all three of your big fingers all pushing or pulling together. Don't worry about bending with a single finger alone until ...


3

From the Ibanez technical forum: The tremolo is held in position by two opposing tensions - from the strings, and from the springs in the rear cavity. You can adjust the position of the spring claw, by loosening and tightening the highlighted screws, to get the correct balance.


2

The lighter the gauge the easier it is to bend but that does not mean it is automatically better. I do find some of the finer dynamics of vibrato and bending are lost in the lighter string tensions. Sure you can bend higher easier but subtle vibratos become harder as a consequence. Also the loss of tension in regards to bending does make it harder to bend ...


2

More details about the output connections available on your amp and pedals would help, but in the meantime I have a couple suggestions: Most multi-effects pedals have a headphone out, or even a line out, both of which could be connected directly to your Mac Mini (from looking at the specs, it looks like your Mac has a 3.5mm stereo line input). In this case ...


2

Different amplifier or pedal input stages may have different characteristics. The sound of a guitar will be affected in some measure by the characteristics of the device to which it is connected. To use a mechanical analogy, consider the relationship between the strings and the sounding board on an acoustic guitar. The strings try to move the sounding ...


2

Generic pedals that are useful for all electric guitar genres are: Volume boost and Volume rocker pedal for solos and for adjusting volume on the fly. Overdrive for solos, tone coloration and sustain Chorus for shimmering effects and to soften the harshness of the overdrive


1

This is a subjective question, but my opinion is that there is only one essential pedal for a gigging musician: a tuner. Obviously, tuners keep you in tune, and they also serve as a kill switch so you can put your guitar down without worrying about feedback. I feel the best overdriven or distorted sounds are generated by tube amps, not pedals, for any ...


1

One use for the bypass is when recording. The pedal then acts as a split box, the output is sent to e.g. an amp, while the bypassed signal could be sent to e.g. a re-amp box, which allows recording of the "clean" signal. This allows the track to be recorded again, with a different amp, the same amp on a different setting, sent to modelling software, ...


1

JCPedroza's answer is pretty thorough, but I think it's actually a bit simpler. Distortion, in general, is when the sound gets too loud for the equipment and the peaks and valleys of the waveform get clipped off. An effect named "overdrive" simulates this, only clipping off waves that are louder than some threshold parameter. So you can play quietly and ...


1

The second sound sample sounds like you recorded the line out of your amp. Guitar amp speakers (and cabinets) are not hi-fi, they change the sound tremendously, it is part of the guitar sound. Amp line outs generally have a very simplistic speaker simulation that sound like your second recording. Most of them are not suitable for good recording. I don't ...


1

You don't need both the NS-2 and the Decimator, pick one. I like the NS-2 for high gain stuff. The ISP Decimator is not really a true gate so I might just ditch it. Your chain should be something like: NS-2 > compressor > chorus/phaser > delay. This is into the front of the amp. Loops are too finicky for my tastes, but you could go NS-2 to amp input, then ...



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