New answers tagged

3

Adding to Todd's answer - the bass chorus in particular.My Boss (others are available - but not necessarily with this feature!) has a 'low filter' facility. This specifically applies the chorus effect to just the upper frequencies if required, which cuts out the muddiness produced when low frequency notes have a chorus effect used on them. Subtle, but ...


8

Sometimes it's just the color of the case, the branding (Bass Fuzz X28-B instead of just Fuzz X28), and the marketing ("As seen in Bass Magazine!"). If it goes beyond that, well obviously bass effects are designed to handle a wider range of frequencies, especially those below the normal range of a guitar. In addition to an overall wider frequency response, ...


-1

It is definitely best to try to play it by ear. Sheet and tab can only convey so much, as it can't really capture the tone, nuance, emotion, feel, etc. So learn to play by ear and your skills will last a lifetime, versus playing tabs which will fade if you don't practice for 5 years...but if you can play by ear, you'll always be able to play.


0

Use all the resources you have. I would get the tabs from a source that is reliable like books or magazines. You can also go to YouTube and find the most trusted videos of a demonstration. I find going with a video at full and half speed can help. Use a combination of both and you will be fine. You also don't have to be note for note on every solo. Some ...


1

The best way to learn a solo depends on your current ability and your preferred learning style. Since I don't know either as it relates to you, allow me to offer what I personally do when learning a solo. I perform mostly covers either solo or as part of a duo or full band. When covering a solo, my goal is to play something that the audience will ...


2

What you're asking is not too clear. However, if you want or need to faithfully reproduce a solo, the best way is to listen to it many, many times, and try to copy it exactly.Even considering the tone, effects used, etc. It will depend on how good a player you are and how experienced you are as to how well that works, and how long it takes. If it's for a ...


1

When initially learning, or if trying to play an exact cover, you will want to copy the artist's style, and try to learn it note for note, including all nuances. Once you can confidently play a range of pieces, you will realise you are developing your own quirks and style, and you'll probably change notes, licks, bends and timing. If it is painful, you may ...


4

I empathise with you. For years, I played like that. Each solo was learned individually. Then it was realised that some players tended to use the same set of notes in a lot of their solos. For instance, pentatonic minor. Once it was realised that the sound of that scale was distinctive, I could recognise the sound of the same set of notes in other solos.So, ...


1

99 percent of the time, it's a guitar issue. best bet is to pull out the electronics, (not difficult) and check your ground wires. very common problem with "beginner guitars" cheap wires and no shielding. I use old coax cable or such, with the copper braiding. replace the ground line to your output jack and pow! no more ground noise. 99.99% guaranteed ...


1

It would sound familiar. He was probably playing the notes from the pentatonic scales. There are two, both containing the same notes. Let's take those notes in the key of C. C, D, E, G and A. Thus missing out the B and F from the full C maj. scale. They all sound fine, played in any order, partly because the 'avoid' notes of B and F don't get played. ...


0

It also actually could be the string. You did not mention if the string was a nylon or a wound string, but you probably mean a plain steel string (it seems like it's a solid electric). You also did not say if the replacement strings are the same type and gauge. Anyway, a string can be defective by having inconsistencies at various points along its length. ...


1

There are many causes to poor intonation A bent neck. A twisted neck. The guitar saddle can be on a bad angle or height for the specific string. The most common type of guitar for this is a Stratocaster since the there is a mini saddle for each individual string. Dints between each frett from old age. Concaves on the fretboard is a common cause for old ...


0

The only thing I can imagine that would cause this is neck bend, or that the fret at 12 is unusually high or low.


2

He uses various muting types. You have spotted the thumb muting, which is very effective He also mutes with the first three fingers of his right hand (most of his plucking is done with the first two so the third is used a lot in this respect) Mark also uses left hand damping, where he slightly releases pressure on the strings Right hand palm heel muting is ...


0

Rocksmith 2014 is very good. It's kind of like guitar hero but using a real guitar to play along with original recordings of songs. The focus is on learning and playing along with songs, but it does have an amp/pedal simulation mode and dynamic jamming mode. You need to buy the software and the usb to guitar cable.


0

I have four things that I use regularly... 1) Trio - You play a progression into it, then it plays back a bass and drum backing track in a selected genre and the key that you played in. 2) Beat Buddy - A sadly named piece of equipment, but awesome drum backing track pedal. 3) Line 6 Amplifi - Check it out. Can totally model sound and plug any of the above ...


1

Well you could easily plug-in and play your guitar through your computer. Things you need to get this done are : A USB guitar link : A USB interface for your guitar . This helps connecting your guitar with the computer . There are many good quality and cheap USB guitar links available online so getting one is easy, DAW Software (Digital Audio Workstation ...


10

They are indeed called horns. In the 60s/70s, Burns made some electric guitars called Black Bison, I seem to remember,and the horns did resemble those of a bison.The cutaway is necessary to reach higher frets, but if the horns were removed as well, the balance of the instrument would be compromised even more. Besides which,as you say, most manufacturers need ...


4

They're called horns: The indentations next to them (beside the neck) are referred to as cutouts or cutaways, and are usually more often what is referenced in relation to the general shape of a guitar body. In the image I've provided, the guitar is a single cutaway, and the image you have shown is a double cutaway.


-1

in standard tuning, .11 is a nice fat sounding gague, and drop d and also open E and Open A For crazy stuff like drop C or whtever, get a guitar all set up for that, I like to keep thinner strings at least 4 pts apart(thickness)


0

I believe you're asking two different questions here. No, omitting one string should not damage your guitar. Now as far as gauges and tunings go, you simply will not find a set that will play reasonably from drop-D to drop-A. Depending on what kind of guitar your have and its scale length, the 64 will probably be too loose still for drop-A. I'd stick with ...


0

Fingering will be subjective. Everyone's finger lengths, relatively speaking,and stretchability, are slightly different, so what suits one may well not suit another. Your theory is sound, and what works better for you will usually be the one to embrace. You may even find that on a different guitar, with different neck profile, etc., you need to adapt how you ...


3

You have a few issues there. I'll go for the obvious ones: you are taking too much time to change notes you are stopping a note before you play the next one you aren't using a compressor Practice sorts out those first two - timing your pick hand and fretting hand will make a major difference. Slash plays some notes as hammer-ons and pull-offs as well. A ...


4

While any latency does upset the feedback loop between ears-brain-fingers, you can of course work around this through practice. You could probably become proficient without being able to hear the sounds at all. Sure, it could slow down learning until your brain has come to terms with the latency delay, but as you still have the physical touch feedback from ...


4

Fret buzz is not only not necessarily bad, but actually a part of the guitar tone. The guitar is partially a percussive instrument, and one percussive aspect of that (in addition to knocking or tapping on the body of an acoustic guitar or hollow-body electric) is the snap produced by string-on-fret action. Slap guitar technique in particular exploits this ...


5

Fret buzz isn't necessarily a sign of a poor setup, because some players want low action and can accept some fret buzz. A guitar tech should discuss this with a player before doing a setup. Having strings fret out when bending is more serious and I would expect a tech to make sure this isn't happening, unless a player said they don't do string bending and ...


11

The lower the fret action, the more buzz you will get. Your ideal height will be based on what you need. Unamplified, many of the really fast guitarists have fret buzz all over the neck. Personally, I use a reasonably high action on most of my guitars (about 3mm at 12th fret) because I dislike buzz and have quite a hard picking action. I do have two guitars ...


9

No, you cannot plug your guitar in this particular keyboard. The Phones jack is a stereo output for headphones, the sustain connector is for a pedal/controller and the midi connectors are for midi control signals to and from an audio interface of some description. It is possible to connect guitars to some keyboards, as I have utilized this functionality in ...


3

The strings buzz quite consistently but not enough to be heard through an amp Strings buzzing not only puts you off playing but it will prevent the string from resonating for as long and lower your tone quality. In my opinion nobody should create fret buzz when you ask them to lower your action. One thing you could try is a higher gauge string, but that ...


1

Herokiller This can be caused by a couple of things. First off, you may just need to replace your strings. Probably a good idea to start fresh if you have to make any adjustments, and old strings are less reliably in tune. Next, have you properly set your guitar's intonation? Just google it: other people have explained it better than I would. Then, the ...


0

I bought my first guitar and chord book when I was 18, stuffed around for 10 years trying to play (admitting putting in about 100 hrs in total) and learn all chords in the book until they burgaled by home and stole my equipment. I gave up, and 10 years later tried again, with a different approach. I have been at it for a year now, it is a difficult road now ...


3

The reason is it's impossible for the intonation on a fretted instrument to be accurate across all strings and frets. Some notes will be off. Right next to the nut is actually a very challenging place for intonation because it's near the end of the strings where the real world behavior is farther from the calculated behavior, and adjusting intonation has the ...


0

PRACTICE "It takes a lot of devotion and work, or maybe I should say play, because if you love it, that's what it amounts to. I haven't found any shortcuts and I've been looking for a long time." __ Chet Atkins


0

The best way to start playing guitar is to slowly walk around a piano, looking at it from all sides, and telling it "you are fat and you are ugly". It's important to do that before you start buying the first amplifiers/speakers weighing in excess of 500lbs. So don't get to it too late. Now there is no king's road to musicianship, like there isn't one into ...


1

If you can't afford lessons, then you may well start off with some bad habits. That said, rock is a genre which can be accepting of bad technique. YouTube is a good way to begin, but I'd really suggest finding some tracks that you really like and getting the tab for them, and just start playing along. Be aware that a lot of tabs online show a possible way ...



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