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1

I never use it. Before playing I wash my hands, and make sure the neck, fingerboard and strings are very clean. I found that using teflon-coated strings makes a big difference in how my fingers (don't) stick too. Better quality strings seem to avoid corrosion better than cheap ones also. Professional players often have their strings changed nightly by ...


1

Some players have sweat that is acidic, and this can affect strings. It's not that common, but I had a pupil whose strings were always rusty only a week after they were fitted new. Fast fret, etc., work well, but so does just rubbing a dry cloth along the strings, particularly underneath, and also on the fretboard itself. I knew one guy who would put talcum ...


2

This issue differs greatly between different guitarists. Some people get the issue you are reporting, that the strings get discoloured almost immediately, while others are not experiencing this at all. This is likely the reason that it is not discussed as a general problem, since it is not something everyone is experiencing. I don't think calluses help this ...


0

Just a thought. The neck pup on Telecasters is placed exactly under a harmonic node. I found this when I 'lost' the double octave on mine, playing the harmonic at that point (24th fret position - which, on Telecasters, obviously has no fret), When I changed from neck pup to bridge pup, the harmonic was audible again. It MAY be that as the neck pup and the ...


4

(This is coming from the perspective of a classical pianist, not a pop/rock guitarist, so bear with me.) This is, as stated in some other answers, the correct, traditional way to practice. In many cases, the only way to gain the muscle-memory necessary to play fast passages is by repeatedly working them out very, very slowly. (Watch a video of, oh, say, Un ...


2

This is certainly the traditional way to practice, but you need to be aware that this method may not lead to the gain of the technique needed to play faster passages. Consider learning to run, for example - you cannot learn to run by just walking faster and faster, running is a fundamentally different technique. To apply to the guitar, consider what would ...


2

Yes, This is exactly how you should be doing it! I have been playing the guitar for over a decade now and took lessons all the way through my middle school and high school years. When ever I was learning a new song, a new scale or a new finger dexterity exercise my tutors would set the metronome at a slow tempo so I could focus on proper finger positioning ...


2

It's actually pretty pointless putting 'moderato' there, as a proper tempo is written. This gives exactly the speed of the piece, in beats per minute, each beat being shown as a crotchet.Back in the Classical days, composers would put the Italian words, which gave a rough to fairly good idea as to the pace of the piece. Nowadays, it's more usual to put the ...


6

Moderate or Moderato is a convention from back before the invention and widespread use of the quartz-powered metronome. Tempo markings are a relatively recent invention, and they are used for their simplicity and accuracy. However, many composers choose to omit them because the "idea" of the tempo of the piece is more important than an absolute value. Other ...


3

Absolutely. There is no better way known to Man. It has always been the way. Folks these days are very lucky - they have the facility to slow tracks to whatever comfortable speed is needed, without changing the key. That's pretty important. When I was learning, we could slow the record player (remember them !) from 45 to 33, sometimes 16 rpm, but that ...


15

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


4

The word Moderate indicates the name for the tempo; each tempo has a different name. Here is a list of the names: adagio: very slow. allegretto: fairly quick, slightly slower than allegro. allegro: lively, rather quick. andante: rather slow, at a moderate, walking pace. andantino: this used to mean a little slower than ...


8

The bass is normally tuned one octave lower than the guitar, therefore you can achieve the same frequency range by lowering the frequency by one octave. You can achieve this with any form of frequency shifting, like an octave pedal. You can then adjust the timbre to carve the sound towards a bass sound, like he is doing by routing the signal to a bass amp. ...


0

it just takes practice, only use your first finger, lay it across all six strings and practice pushing down the top three strings and resting the rest of your finger against the higher strings so they're muted. Your finger just needs time to learn the position - it's called muscle memory. You can do it with multiple fingers but it'll be slower. Also focus ...


0

First of all adjust the action/height on your electric guitar , this link may help you or you can just google it . For your second issue, suppose that you want to bend 8th fret of second string (this note is G ) if you full bend it (not 1/2) you would hear A note (the next note after G) . During bending of any note your left hand finger (if you are right ...


-1

Don't think it is really an issue. Sometimes adjacent strings are pushed too, so they bend as well, silently. Sometimes the adjacent string goes over the bent string as its pushed underneath.Does it really matter? If people like Hendrix had spent (wasted) their time thinking 'is this the correct way to do it' we'd still be in the dark ages.Whatever works ...


3

If you bend the thin E string, I can't see any other way than that the B and sometimes G string will also follow in the same movement. They are not making a sound since they are not touching the frets. So the tutorial videos are showing the correct way of doing it.


0

You may see new chords in the future so I'd highly recommend to use Guitar Pro software : click Note on toolbar then click Chord... then you can select your chord. this website is also good if you don't have access to this software : all-guitar-chords.com. You will find all chords existed up to now ! Additionally,I found it very beneficial, interesting and ...


0

Here's my take on it in the form of a blog post: http://www.osirisguitar.com/three-ways-to-record-electric-guitars/


1

Is it an electric or acoustic guitar ? If acoustic : First is to get a reasonably microphone. this depends on your budget, and "you get what you pay for" right from a few tens of £ / $ up to hundreds or more. However there are two main types : Dynamic and Condenser. Dynamic microphones are generally good for picking up things relatively close by like a ...


0

First of all you need a good microphone. A decent microphone that is used a lot to mic amps is the Shure SM57. Loads of tutorials on Youtube describe how you should mic your amp. Then with the aid of the backing track in you headphones, you should record yourself. Afterwards put the 2 tracks together in your program (Fruityloops or ...).


4

I would just like to point out something that has not been mentioned. Using a finger from your right hand (and no amplification on the guitar), hammer on to a note on the fretboard. Listen closely, and you will hear two distinct notes ringing out. One is the note you would expect to hear -- the fretted note. The other note is the portion of the string ...


3

When you state acoustic guitar, as long as you don't mean classical guitar, it's o.k. I have an Epiphone acoustic that has been strung in his way for 35+ yrs. No problem. I feel that 12s may be a little too heavy a gauge, I'd go for 10s or 11s, but a good move will be to check what gauge the existing strings are. Like for like will cause no problems, as the ...


0

I wouldn't risk it, unless the amp and cab match(from the same company, etc.). I just but an Egnator Tweaker 15W 112 Combo(great amp), and it's pretty heavy so I would put it next to a cab, unless I had the matching cab from Egnator


2

On my cabs, and the bottom of a combo, there are plastic corner pieces that are designed to lock into each other,both back to front and sideways.Not originally - I put them on. Mine hasn't fallen off yet !


4

I think your approach would work. If there is a slanted cabinet, you could put it on the side, to get more area for your combo. The question is if it is worth it. If there are slanted cabinets already (which is the usual setup if only one 4x12 is used), then you will get some sound projected towards your ears. Not as much as you would with the combo on top, ...


0

To actually answer your question, which is "Best strings for heavy metal (I love distortion)?", most metal bands use higher gauge strings across all the brands, i.e. .10 gauge and above, its not so much about the brand. Hybrid gauges are also popular. This is where the "lower strings" (tone wise, E, A, D), are thicker than they would usually be for a ...


0

Another reply has already been marked as answer, but I do believe that if you are looking for Mark's CLEAN SOUND, the model you want is this: 1965 Double Verb (*based on a Fender Twin Reverb) This is a later gear post, but worth mentioning: "For cleans, Tremonti uses a duo of Fender 65 Twin Reissues with a TC Electronic G-Force for delay and reverb" ...



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