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1

First of all, this will only happen when ascending a scale, i.e. when moving to a higher (thinner) string. The reasons for the open string(s) to ring out have been discussed in Tim's answer. In my opinion the best solution to the problem is to mute the string with your left hand index finger. So when the first note on the new string is played with fingers ...


3

There are three parts to playing a note. One - press down string onto fret. Two - release pressure and three - take finger off string. Do this really slowly, and you will hear when the problem occurs. It will usually be the last part. Your fingertip will be making the open string vibrate, in one of two ways. Either because it is stuck slightly to the string, ...


2

The pickups in the classic Gibson Firebird are known as "mini-humbuckers". You can buy adapters to replace the full-size humbucker mounting rings used by many guitars, including most SGs, that will allow a mini-humbucker to be used instead. As this just screws to the top of the guitar in place of the previous ring, it's a reversible operation that won't ...


1

I have had the same type of problem with all of my Les Pauls which have the same type of tune-o-matic bridge and stop tail piece. I recommend that you try the previous answer and turn the saddle in question around and see if that gives you the extra room you need. If that doesn't give that extra room purchase a bridge that is wider and that will give you ...


0

There's really no need for that. For intonation fine tuning, the little screw can be adjusted while the string is under tension, otherwise, the string will need re-tuning each time. As far as action goes, again, there's no need. In fact, it gets in the way to de-tension. A Tune-o-matic bridge has two screws, which will turn while the guitar is in tune. A ...


1

this is so simple. Most a/b switches that have one input and two outputs can be used in reverse. Plug your two guitars into the output jacks on the a/b pedal.....then connect the input jack of the pedal to your amplifier. It works exactly the same in reverse.


1

With a Fender style bridge you just need to loosen one string a little and adjust height and intonation, then retension. To adjust intonation on a one piece (Les Paul style?) bridge you need to loosen a string quite a lot more to allow access to its intonation adjustment at the rear of the bridge. For height adjustment on a one piece bridge you'll need to ...


1

Why do you want to take the strings off to do that? Slacken the one specific string you are working on slightly if you are raising the action or adjusting the intonation rearwards; keep compensating for pitch as you adjust. Otherwise it's just repetetive guesswork as to what it will be like once you reassemble it.


0

...or... Simple unstring, pull up the bridge (nothing holds it) and rotate 180 degree and put down. As I see current the nut in high E is wide enough to fit even the low E string. I risk the hypothesis that now the bridge is (accidentally) rotated compared to the factory at some past repair action. You win: All your saddles will rotated. One extra ...


0

Use the pickups closest to the neck and make sure your hand is as close to the bridge as can be without ruining the sound. I found changing pickups not only makes it sound heavier, but bigger too.


2

In your photo, it appears that the saddles have a wedge-shaped top that is angled on one side only, while the other side is straight/flat. Three appear to be angled in one direction (reflecting the light) and three appear to be wedged in the opposite direction (not reflecting the light). If you reverse a saddle like this, you should be able to get some ...


0

You can try to change the top nut a little bit. Maybe carefully file out the slot/slit a little bit (so change it from the top). I did this with a an acoustic Suzuki Tree guitar and it made a small improvement.


1

Unscrew a saddle so that the screw comes out completely. Turn the saddle through 180 degrees, and replace. It'll give another 2 or 3 mm of adjustment. The intonation looks a little out to me, as B strings are usually longer than the 1st and 3rd.To raise the action, use the two screws at either side of the bridge. Moving saddles tends to change the intonation ...


0

These are acoustic guitars in the tracks but you could probably get a similar sound (since you will be adding effects and processing) using an acoustic simulator with a electric guitar like the Boss AC-3. Having an acoustic simulator with a electric guitar with single coil pickups can create a nice sound. It's not exactly the same as an acoustic guitar but ...


0

Interesting and informative. At least I found it so.


0

Guitarists of all stripes and abilities mix and match strings all the time. Sometimes it's intentional and deliberate, sometimes it's just because (as in your case) that's all they had laying around at the time. Many pro guitarists buy an inventory of individual strings instead of buying prepackaged sets...they prefer a slightly lighter gauge this string ...


0

Lots of misperception here! Besides changes in humidity, using different gauge strings is the next-largest single contributor to action changes/problems, as is tuning the entire guitar up or down a whole step or more. Using alternate open tunings will typically have very tiny, mostly-irrelevant affects on the playing action. The purpose of the truss rod ...


0

A little confusion here! .012" set of strings isn't 'fairly light' - it's about standard. The truss rod doesn't get adjusted in 'steps'. If they meant half a turn it's still meaningless. The truss rod adjustment is only part of sorting out the action. The bridge height is just as relevant. As is the effect of heavy strings. They won't change the action, once ...


0

I've heard that non-wound steel and electric strings all use the exact same wire regardless of manufacturer. Whether that is true or not, it certainly seems to be the case that it is virtually impossible to tell the difference between two new non-wound strings of the same gauge. For wound strings this is not the case. It's quite possible for two wound ...


2

I often, though not always, find a difference in the quality of sound between new and old strings because of the age of the strings. I usually change them all when one single string breaks, for this reason. Some brands have a different quality of metal, or nylon, but for the most part the quality is consistent across brands. I have a negative opinion of ...


0

If the replaced string is a different gauge from the string that you broke it might sound different and it also might sound odd if the gauge is not similar to the string gauge that is already on your guitar. And for the changing brand of string if it is different material it might sound different, and all different string brands and types have a different ...


1

It worked for Hendrix! Why not, though, learn hammering and pulling left handed - after all, your r.h. should be stronger (as a r.h. person). Then you could try two guitars simultaneously. The job would be more successful, as hinted at by leftaroundabout, to use a standard r.h. guitar.


-1

Why I have one? I play metal and death metal and metal core, mainly the really crazy stuff, being able to drop tune it into drop A and still have your high E string is a major gain. Another thing is, Im tired of tuning to different tunings, so if I leave it in drop A (A-E-A-D-G-B-E) I can just use a guitar capo to go to drop B and Drop C etc. It will sound ...


0

Well – why not? It can hardly hurt to try unusual new stuff. But frankly if you just learn to play left-handed guitar left-handed, as well as the same stuff right-handed on right-handed guitar, I don't see the point either. This “can play anything with either hand” boasting is, well... IMO it's ridiculous. What would be rather more interesting ...



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