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0

When answering this question I always answer with 'meh, I know a few chords'. This demonstrates modesty, which some people perceive musicians to be lacking and doesn't set anybodies expectations too high. If people are interested in you joining their band then no descriptions can really be a substitute for actually hearing you play. Now, in terms of ...


4

Several good reasons. It was tried - I tried it as a kid. In front of the guitar, the volume changed dramatically with even an inch or two of movement. It got knocked.It picked up extraneous sounds. So inside it went. Then it rattled around. The feedback was pretty well uncontrollable. Solid bodies solved a lot of the feedback problems, but that made the ...


0

I dont know what you mean by a mic in the front of an acoustic, but if you mean on a stand, that would drastically reduce mobility for the guitar player, if you mean attached to the guitar, it would mean decresed stability and a high possibility that the mic would fall (especially considering the size of the microphones at the time the electric guitar came ...


1

If you want to play loud in the presence of other instruments like you said, you will also amplify the other instruments and more noises (like your voice if you say something) through your microphone. Pickups for electric guitars are developed in such a way that they are mainly recording what you are actually playing on the guitar. It is also difficult for ...


5

I'm sorry, I can't find the quote, it's pre-WWW. But I think it was in an interview in "Guitar Player," that Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones once replied to some flattery by saying that he was only an intermediate guitar player. Because he was better than a lot of guitar players but a lot of guitar players were better than him. So I'd go with ...


7

Not the easiest of questions to try to answer, but - exams have always been a way to determine this kind of level. In essence, someone on, say, grade V on any instrument could be construed as as advanced as another who has grade V. Especially if it's on the same instrument. However, there are various different styles of guitar, and playing.This has been ...


1

A simple cable "Y" splitter will allow two guitars to work on one amp, if one is using a "clean" sound [no deliberate distortion] and can live with the fact that each guitar's volume control will have some effect on the volume of both guitars (the volume control on each guitar works by both restricting the flow of sound to from the pickups to the cable, and ...


0

What is the capacitor you bought? Did you get one of the same type as the one that was there before? Good capacitors for audio, especially guitar applications, are not easy to find, there is a big counterfaction market in electronic components, and audio is one of the applications where you actually note the difference between originals and counterfeits... ...


0

Yes, you can do it with a passive Y-splitter. If there is an increased hum / ground loop problem you can use a direct box for one of them. Plug the guitar into the the DI input, connect amp A to DI through and amp B to DI output, for example. However, there is no guarantee the either amp will sound the same as it does on its own, because the input impedance ...


0

When you say it "sounds ok on bottom string," are you are talking about the bottom pickup (the bridge pickup) or "treble"/down position on the 3-way switch? If that sounds okay, and it is only the middle and top positions (middle uses both pickups, top "rhythm" uses just the neck pickup), then it sounds like your problem might be something involving the ...


2

Most of the other answers have covered your options, but there is one more possibility you might want to consider before buying an electric guitar. They make sound-hole dampeners for acoustic guitars that are used to fight feedback when playing an acoustic amplified on stage, but they also provide some dampening of the volume of the guitar. Check the link ...


2

I agree with the others that you should try an electric. Quite with no amp. Or would it be possible to find a place other than your flat to practice?


5

For acoustic style (nylon string or steel string) there is also the possibility of buying a silent guitar. Such guitars create the same output volume as electric guitars when not plugged in.


3

If you can get an electric guitar, that'd be the easiest approach. Just play it without amplification. And you could even use headphones to make sure you could hear yourself. If you're using an acoustic, you can do a few things to muffle the sound: Put a t-shirt inside the body (inside the soundhole) to dampen it a bit. Weave cloth between the strings by ...


1

If you had an electric guitar you could play it without using an amplifier. The sound would be very low but YOU could hear it if there wasn't too much other noise around. Also some amplifiers have a headphone jack that can cut off the speaker and send the sound only thru the headphones. I also think that you can play an electric guitar through your ...


0

First, I'm assuming that your gain isn't cranked while your volume is up. Second, connections can be bad. I'd first try turning knobs (normally volume or gain) and seeing how that affects the crustiness. If it goes away, you probably have a dirty contact in the know and you can try cleaning or replacing it, or (if you're lazy as I am) turning it a bunch ...


0

Yes, but it's good practice to keep both amps on the same electrical circuit (try using the same outlet for both) to avoid hum or even electrocution (usually mild, but dangerous on a wet floor).


1

Let me give you the physicist-who-plays-a-bit-of-guitar answer: "yes and no. it depends". Here is why: A guitar can have different kinds of pickups, but these have in common that the power in the signal they (the pickups) produce is quite small. Now electrically, power is voltage times current. Some "high impedance" pickups produce a high voltage and ...


0

Before spending $350 a THD hotplate per Lucas answer, which is basically just a high-powered volume control (variable resistor) between the amp and speaker, I would do the following: Buy a high powered fixed resistor from an electronics components store, of a resistance (ohms) about 2-4 times the impedance (ohms) of the speaker. Install the resistor in ...


6

I don't think it will work with just a split cable. One complication is ground loops, which cause hum. I'd recommend to use a stereo pedal, or a dedicated AB/Y pedal. You might still get hum, but there are some remedies, like rotating the power plug 180 degrees and plug it in again for one of the amps, using an AB/Y pedal with ground lift, having isolated ...


1

Yes it is possible. I don't really know if the cable you are referring to will work (I don't see why not) but, what I have seen is people using pedals to do this. There are some pedals that have 2 exits that are the same. So, you can use that pedal to plug your guitar into two different amps. This is what El Ten Eleven do. They use a pedal like that (I ...


2

There may be a 'perfect' solution using a nice little sub-mixer, but frankly, yes, it can be done... & has been done many times over the years. Relative volumes may depend on the impedance of the inputs on each amp, but the overall sound is up to you to balance up until you like it. Edit - perhaps very pertinent right now, the new band Royal Blood ...


1

I use the tone knob to tweak the sustain and tone when I use an overdrive pedal with an electric guitar. Most overdrives have a "sweet spot" that has a touch of feedback and a really good cutting tone. That's what I look for.


3

For my bass guitar I like to look at the tone knob as a "hot" or "cold" type situation. Hot: This is when you want to cut through, or you have a prominent part. In the case of the bass, if I have a finger-style solo the tone knob is up pretty high. If I have a moving part in mid-range, it's up about half way. Cranking the tone up tends to sound more ...


0

It combines the two ways that pedals are usually connected to amps. The usual, older method was to plug guitar into pedal, then pedal into amp. A simple series connection. This means that the whole series is guitar> pedal> pre amp>post amp.Meaning that the pedal coloured the signal, which was then re-coloured by the pre amp, with mainly tonal control. Amp ...


8

Some effects (like wah or fuzz) work better* when they come before the preamp while some effects (like delay or reverb) work better* if they come after it. Yet some others (chorus or tremolo) can work equally well either way depending on the sound you're looking for. To provide this flexibility, most amps are equipped with an effects loop. It consists of an ...


1

For jazz it is quite common to roll off heavily on the tone knob, for a more mellow sound. Danny Gatton used the tone knob on his tele for some interesting organ like sounds.


1

On my bass, when I use slapping techniques, I lower the Tone knob to the 3/4 of a turn. This gives me a sound that is loud, but not noisy. Usually, if I have my tone knob on full and I slap, the outcome is way too noisy. Also, I lower the tone knob when I want a more 'dark' sound on my bass or guitar. I'm not really sure how to express the outcome but you ...


2

My main gigging guitar has a very high powered bridge pickup that needs me to rolloff both the volume and the tone knob about an 1/8th of a turn. This gives me a sound that is a good lead guitar sound. Then when I get to a solo, I can bring up the volume to stand out, and for bright solos to cut through, I can bring the tone knob back up. Generally I use ...


4

Because of the way vibrations on a string work, from the fundamental all the way up to the highest harmonics, the closer to the bridge you get, the more the balance skews towards higher harmonics. Conversely a pickup at the 12th fret would be overwhelmed by the fundamental on the open string. From Wikipedia: So what Fender mention is generally correct: ...


3

A pick-up will pick up (!) the sound a string is making just above it. The three pups on Strats are (or used to be, originally) identical. The string vibrates at a different amplitude - hope it's the correct word - as in the movement is greater the closer to the string centre you get. So by the bridge, the pup will hear a tighter, thinner sound. One uses the ...


0

One of my favorites, Steve Morse, individually controls both the volume AND the tone knobs with his pinky finger while soling and playing chords. He developed this style on his original custom Tele, but carried forward the knob accessibility into both of his EB Music Man models. You can find plenty of his material on YouTube; the solo stuff features his own ...


2

Yes, you will need to set it up again. There are two essential reasons for any guitar -- bow, and intonation. (For those with tremolo bridges, other responses have already addressed that.) Bow: The string gauge effectively determines the total tension on the guitar neck, when the string are tuned to pitch. (Note that this affects those who change tunings ...


0

Yes you will need to set that lovely Strat up again. Don't worry, you can't screw your guitar up. Take a look on youtube, there are many videos that explain how to do it. The hard thing on a Strat is finding the perfect balance on that tremelo system. I like the Carl Verheyen technique a lot, I use it constantly! Make sure to work with already stretched ...


5

Slim's answer already covers some of this, but I just want to emphasize how massively rich in overtones any guitar is. Only a pure sine wave doesn't have overtones, any natural instrument is rich in them (in fact each overtone is a sine wave). The only spectral difference between a violin and a guitar lies in which overtones are most present, and what their ...


5

Overdriven, distorted guitar sounds contain loads of harmonics, and tend to emphasise them quite well. By experimenting with these sorts of sounds, along with different pup settings, and plucking in different places on your strings, you may come close.Valve amps do it better, but there are several pedals also.


8

Guitars are already rich in overtones and harmonics. Experiment with the position of your right hand. Picking near the neck emphasises the fundamental frequency. Picking nearer the bridge brings out more overtones. The biggest differences between a guitar and a violin are the size of the instrument, and the fact that a violin is bowed. You could try ...


0

Just go with a standard set. You will not be able to hear the difference with too much distortion I believe. Just pick a standard set of .009 to .042 since that is easy to handle... It's all about personal preferences. Don't pick strings because they should sound better. Pick them because you personally think they sound better and most importantly, they feel ...


1

DR strings are hands down the best strings for metal. Several different types of DR's, but they are all great. Strings actually do make a fairly big difference in sound, and playability.


2

I would also question the assertion that heavier strings --in and of themselves-- increase sustain. Indeed they have more mass --which implies more inertia to keep the string moving. But this ignores or discounts the opposing tensile force of the string material itself which resists stretching from resting to extended position as the string vibrates. So, ...



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