New answers tagged

0

A sound example would be helpful here. In my opinion, you should record guitars always in mono, because mostly you will just have one mono signal (if you are working with one mic or a line in signal) If you want to have stereo, which is recommended, record two different tracks and set them to your left and right channel with a bit of variation in your amp ...


0

I truly prefer the 1st version. Since all my guitars have trems (I got only one with a FR), the first spring setup suited my guitars best ; the second one always put my guitar out of tune whenever I used the tremolo. The 6th string had too much tension, resulting in a sharp (de)tuning when I got the tremolo back into position.


1

The answer will really depend on what you think a crappy guitar sound is. I've never used your particular effects unit but I have used plenty of others like it, so perhaps the following will help... Usually what I do in any given situation is to remove as much as possible from the signal chain to make sure that the clean and un-effected sound of any ...


2

This is just the way all classic tube amp designs pushing 12" cones sound. Close backed cabinets are even more directional than open backed cabinets with the same drivers. I play live with a 1x12 combo and I deliberately point it right at my head and make it sound a little too bright and harsh. That way I can always hear my amp over the rest of the band and ...


1

There are several possible causes: As a general rule, the sound produced by a loudspeaker is more directionally "focused" at high frequencies. If the speaker is aimed directly at the opposite wall of a room, you are likely to get "organ pipe" resonances because of sound reflecting directly from the wall back onto the speaker. In this case, there may be ...


4

Most answers are focusing on the question as written, i.e can this be done, and the answer is of course yes, with the right equipment. It is however, not a good idea, because (even if you avoid issues like distortion intermodulation) having the sound of both guitars coming from the same speaker makes it difficult to distinguish who is playing what. This is ...


3

You might find that the faulty spots on the high frets don't impede your practice very much. After all, there are plenty of notes that work, which you can use to practice most pieces of music. :) Since you set up the truss rod, you probably checked the intonation. One major difference between Strat and Tele on the one hand, and Les Paul on the other is the ...


1

If one needs to have two or more guitarists playing for a group, it may be helpful to have guitar feed a dedicated monitor speaker, but have most of the sound come from a PA amplifier which is fed both. For many musicians, however, it will be important to have at least some of the sound for each guitar coming from a speaker which is dedicated to that ...


1

However, I don't want to blow more money than necessary on something that I may well give up on in 2 months. Hmmm. Sounds like my first electric guitar apart from the high frets. (An Epiphone Strat copy from the 1980s, funnily enough. Weedy single coil pickups and a trebly bridge humbucker.) I'd suggest: fix the pickup height with blutak or tape. ...


2

I think the term Wham Bar or Whammy Bar came into use after Lonnie Mack's hit single, "Wham" which made extensive use of the tremolo arm.


0

A lot of guitarists fall into either the Strat. camp or the Les Paul camp. It's interesting that you have a Strat type of guitar already, but would prefer to maybe get a new Les Paul type. The two are very different in many ways, which is why some prefer one over the other - none is superior, just different. So my reasoning is that if you really liked the ...


6

Plugging two guitars into a guitar amplifier that is designed for one guitar at a time, can be done - but it's not recommended for reasons suggested in other answers. You can find many guitar amps billed as "two channel" amps, but many of these are still intended to amplify only one guitar at a time. They might have a "clean" channel and a "dirty" ...


0

You can end up spending a great deal of money upgrading the components of your entry level guitar. Fret work is expensive, the tuning gears may not be the best quality, the pickups may not be first class and more. But no matter how much you spend, it will still have a neck that might not be perfectly straight (could be twisted or bowed), and the finish may ...


8

It is possible to mix the signal of two guitars before going in the amp. You can even plug two simultaneously into a single input with a simple Y-adaptor; you can mix the relative loudness with the volume pots (though it will be fiddly). A small mixer gives much better control, but the impedance of the line input on such mixers is usually rather too low for ...


3

Tim's mixer suggestion is probably the best way to get started with minimum outlay. A two channel amp might be another option. I use an old Fender Princeton Chorus, which is a smallish 50W 2x10 solid state combo. The clean tones and stereo chorus are really nice, but of relevance here is the fact that you can plug in two guitars and effectively you have two ...


4

A lot of guitar amps have two inputs - often 'high' and 'low'. Either or both can be used, so two guitars will work this way. The obvious problem is that whatever tone and volume the amp is set at, it will be the same for both guitars. Maybe not ideal. A better idea is to use a small mixer (I have a few Behringer mic mixers which do a similar job) to plug ...


4

it is possible with an adapter from 2 jacks to 1 but since it is 1 channel you may experience one guitar distorting the other. I have tried it but the result was not very pleasing to the ear.


4

Before addressing the question directly, a short, simplistic and far from complete list of things that make a good guitar: it makes good sounds it doesn't make bad sounds (or when it does, they're not the guitar's fault) it's comfortable to play it's consistently in tune up and down the fingerboard it stays in tune the above points remain true ten years ...


6

The main difference is in the price and the quality. The fender guitars are more expensive and tend to be of higher quality, whereas Squier guitars are made more cheaply and have lower quality. By this I don't mean that the Squier guitars are low quality and bad, but (usually) they are not so good as a Fender guitar. By good and low quality, I refer mostly ...


0

With today's amp modeler you don't really need a Guitar amp. Using a guitar amplifier will just color the tone from your amp modeler. PA is way better. If you are going to use an AMP modeler DON'T BUY a GUITAR AMP.


1

Raising pickup will make it sound more characteristic for position. So neck position will become more fat and bridge will have more treble. Lowering should do opposite. Set best for you.


0

To reduce noise from single coil you have several options: Step away from interference source or turn it off if possible Fix the guitar shielding if it is wrong Buy noiseless single coils


2

I was having the same problem as a beginner and wondered the exact same thing. I even tried switching to playing guitar the other way around (fretting with my dominant right hand). That's when I discovered something interesting. You see by the time I became frustrated with my seemingly clumsy left hand because of the things it could not seem to do as ...


0

Are you talking about 0:15 in? I hear it most there. Since you rule out the pickup height... How old are your strings? If there's any age or cruft to them try a fresh set. It'll only cost you $4, and usually anytime I get "weirdness" like this it's because of the strings themselves. The clean clip sounds pretty dead, that's what makes me think the strings ...


0

Check the seating of the saddles the strings rest on at the bridge (and the nut slot seating for open notes) to make sure there is good contact between the string and bridge. We want the most surface contact with the strongest connection for vibration to resonate and sustain through the body of the guitar. This is in addition to the comment made by Jamie, ...


1

If you go with no cab you probably want a speaker simulation method in addition to having a line out and a load box to compensate for no load on the head. I personally prefer the actual tone of a cabinet over a sim, mostly because of the warmth and compression. I would try both out, especially since there are great options both ways. Since you mentioned ...


3

The answer is that nickel wound strings (found on electric sets and John Pearse Nickle Wound Acoustic sets) of a given gauge (diameter) will have less overall mass than an equivalent gauge "Phosphor Bronze" or "80/20 Bronze" and therefore tune to a given pitch at slightly lower tension (assuming equal scale length). See comparison chart at end of this ...


3

The scale length will be a factor; for a given gauge, the longer the string, the more tension will be required to tune it to the same pitch. The difference between strings of the same gauge will be due to their weight or mass per unit length. This gauge comparison is only valid for like strings -- that is, wound vs. wound, or unwound vs. unwound. A wound ...


1

Ever considered Martin Monel acoustic strings? They are nickel plated strings for acoustics and give you a different feel and more flexible response...


4

As near as dammit. The difference will be the third (G) string. Generally on an electric set it's plain, but wound on an acoustic set. You probably wouldn't want the plain on an acoustic, although that's what my acoustics usually have - full electric sets. Slightly thinner, but that means less tension.


5

It's not easy to say which is "better", but they will definitely be different. First, if you go straight from a tube head to the PA, you'll need some way to match the output of the head to one of the PA's inputs, and you'll want to simulate the sound of a guitar speaker cabinet. A good way to do this for a tube head is with a speaker simulator and a passive ...


0

few things you can try here, a noise supressor pedal can help eliminate the pick noise but too much can cause you to lose sustain. also see if you can lower your pickups a little and use more volume and eq from your amp to get the tone you need and may lose. most of the time you don't lose enough to notice unless you bottom out the pickups. a pickup too ...


1

I have been playing through not only a p/a speaker, but using a full stereo p/a amplifier. This is because I have been fully converted to Modelling technologies. Up until recently I was using a VOX Tonelab LE, and it finally took a crap so I picked up an HD500. I have better sound than anybody on an standard amp, and it's versatile as hell. I can go clean ...


-2

Just buy another amp m80. Look around hard enough and you can find em cheaper than dirt. And you won't have to sacrifice tone


1

In my strat like guitar string retainers were set too low (and also too sharp). It was cutting the E and B strings every two days. I minimally raised them and problem disappeared. If you broke string it is important to check where it was cut.



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