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4

Just a bit more info on cyco130's answer : 'Tis indeed a volume swell effect, and is an electric guitar. The technique is to pluck the note with the volume turned down, then bring the volume in - either via a volume pedal or using the volume control on the guitar. Some guitars make this easier because the volume control is easily reachable from where your ...


5

This effect is called volume swell. It's achieved by fading in notes using your volume knob or a volume pedal.


0

I don't know what J-Rock is definitively as it could mean a number of things, however if you mean a 'metal' style rock guitar sound that I believe to be popular over there, then it can be quite simple: Strip all of your pedals and effects, and turn all dials to zero; Turn the volume up as far as it will go; Keep the Bass and Treble dials high; Turn down ...


0

Clarity in a clean tone, that also doesn't sound 'weedy' and 'thin' can be difficult, however there are a couple of things you can (or should do) to get there, and none involves using a pedal. First of all know that distortion and overdrive are two different things. The classic way to achieve such tones are by playing through low wattage valve (or tube) ...


1

Re The track "My God is the Sun ~ Queens of the Stone Age" you mention: This is what I'm hearing .. Sounds like humbucker pickup guitar (eg Les Paul, or many other typew) as opposed to single coil pickup (eg Fender Strat) Two guitars playing together, often one string each. This means the distortion is only acting on that one string per guitar amp, so ...


-2

Use a heavier pick and attack the strings harder. I'm not a genius but I feel the heavier the pick, the less it bends off the string giving more of a cut between hits. I believe also the harder the pick the heavier the string attack giving more of a driven sound.


2

Notwithstanding Matt's answer, it depends on what the tempo is. After a certain tempo [varies by individual] there is no longer any option to count 'verbally' - either in your head or out loud - you just have to feel it, because the 16ths can still sit nicely in your head long after any attempt to verbalise them will fail.


4

It helps if you just listen to the metronome, tapping along with your foot and saying some four-syllable word on each beat (e.g. "caterpillar"). Each syllable then represents one 16th note, so you get a feeling for how 16th notes sound at the given tempo. As soon as you can hear the 16th notes in your head, you should also be able to play them. I would ...


0

All the things you mention are important to playability - and can be adjusted. The factors that can't are the scale length (obvious), and the neck profile and fingerboard radius. Those two things are very subjective - they either get liked by the player, or not. Often because they are similar to a favourite instrument. String spacing and indeed strings come ...


0

Since we are living in the age of affordable high-precision CNC, it is reasonably easy to produce a highly playable guitar. What precision milling is not going to buy you is high quality wood and working carefully with the grain and sensitivities of the material. In five years, your Strat is likely to be just as playable as it is now, given reasonable ...


1

This bridge is a Washburn Wonderbar system, as used by Ace Frehley during his Washburn endorsee years. He subsequently had one fitted to his Les Paul during that time, my belief is this is a guitar owned by a fan looking to emulate his Les Paul - the 12th fret inlay is that of the Epiphone signature model from the 90s which Ace has never played live.


1

Nobody so far has actually discussed stratitis yet. Well, it probably isn't the issue! Before I say why, another thing: pickup damage is almost certainly not the issue either. Symptoms of pickup damage are: Dull sound due to resonance damping by shortcuts between windings. Happens when the isolation is faulty. Loud thudding sound when you touch the ...


3

That is relatively rate for a Les Paul, as most have fixed bridges, but that is a Floyd Rose Licensed Tremolo. Edit (actually, on closer inspection, it is not a Floyd Rose but some other type) - a device to allow you to change the tension, and hence pitch, of all six strings at once. It is a logical development of the old Fender trem, and it can cope with a ...


1

This is indeed one variation of a standard blues cliché. The chords they play are | A A7/C# D7 D#dim7 | A Adim7 A7 | Note the chromatically ascending bass line in the first bar: A C# D D# which would often lead to an A7/E chord, i.e. the chromatic line would continue up to the E. The descending melody line you hear could be | A G F# F# | E Eb E | ...


2

The edge sits right in the slot underneath the head, but above the area that is threaded. Just like your last picture. Here's a nice diagram, scroll down to see it http://www.thefret.net/showthread.php/12486-Ibanez-Edge-Tremolo-Knife-Edges


2

There are a variety of finger picks available, in metal and plastic. These picks are so long that the technique (hand/finger motions) involved is different from what you get with your fingers, let alone that the tone is significantly different. For me, metal picks on electric guitar was unacceptable. Alaska Pik provides an option that is closer to just ...


1

Just set both iTunes and whatever software you are using to monitor your guitar (DAW, plugin host, software mixer, whatever) to use the same sound card (in this case your M-Track) and same outputs (in this case the ones assigned to the headphones). For iTunes routing you need to set the whole system audio to use your sound card. You can do it in the system ...


0

I use Guitar Rig with ASIO4All and have noticed it locks the sound to itself. I can not play any other audio while GuitarRig or Amplitube (which both uses the ASIO driver). You can open a sound file with Guitar Rig's player and play songs and backtracks that way.


0

For a song in C#, the more melodic parts need a C# harp. To get a bluesy sound/feel, you'll need an F# harp, which will give a blues sound when sucked, or drawn, producing C#7 and C#9.


2

Pick up a used made in U.S.A. Les Paul Standard or Studio. These are real deal, professional instruments you can pass along to your grandkids. Its practically the definition of dark, fat, humbucker tone. Or if they don't do it for you can resell them for what you paid for them. The Custom costs more but has less long term value. Plus, I think it looks a ...



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