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2

Well it sounds like the amp is the problem. If you've tried sitting in different positions and distances from the amp, in different rooms, different pickups, different channels, and you haven't had the problem sitting right next to a different amp or with an acoustic, I can't see what the problem could be. Ask other people what they think, it might not be ...


5

You should find out if it's your ears or your equipment. This could be done by taking your guitar to a music store and try it with some device that supports headphones, like the one below (there are other brands). That will bring the room out of the picture. If you don't feel pain, then one solution is to get one of those devices and practice with it instead ...


1

My advice to this: play with what you want and what feels good to you! Take other's advice, but do your thing with it. If you want 17 guitars, go ahead, buy 17 guitars. As long as it feels good to yourself! So , if you really want to keep the guitar: keep it! If you want to sell it, sell it! I wouldn't sell it because it wouldn't bring you that much money ...


1

My guitar teacher had arthritis. He said he cannot actually play professionally anymore. However he was a really very good teacher to teach from the beginner level, and was able to demonstrate how to play simple pieces a fresh guitar learner usually starts from. Time to time he used piano instead of guitar to demonstrate how the piece should sound. This ...


2

Not necessarily about arthritis. But any hand problems. I suffered a slight stroke a few years ago and my left hand was missing chords by a couple of frets.After playing and earning a living from my passion. I thought it was over. But after I finished feeling sorry for my self and realizing it could have been a lot worse, I started over. My Right hand and ...


-2

The main question is whether your guitar sounds in tune when playing higher frets. It's been my experience that the thicker strings call for slightly more string length in order to be reasonably in pitch with the thinner strings on high frets. This effect will be less pronounced with guitars having a flatter action since the difference in string length ...


1

It does sound like your guitar isn't set up correctly, as the tremolo should be parallel with no buzz. The main problem I see is not so much with the tremolo, but with the fret buzz, though. This leaves you with some options. Leave the bridge non-parallel: The first option would be to leave the bridge in a non-parallel position to avoid fret buzz. This is ...


4

There is a good article here; Signal To Noise: The Sonic Diary Of The Smashing Pumpkins. To summarise the key points: Amp: Early-80s Marshall JCM-800 2203 (KT88 tubes) through 1960A cabinets Pedals: Corgan achieved Siamese Dream’s highly stylized tone with a litany of DOD pedals and a ’70s-era, silver-faced Big Muff Pi Guitar: As the guitar ...


-1

I don't recall any details, but I remember hearing that he had many, many amps. And he turned them up very loud. Unless muted, the strings would immediately feedback and squeal.


3

From the Ibanez technical forum: The tremolo is held in position by two opposing tensions - from the strings, and from the springs in the rear cavity. You can adjust the position of the spring claw, by loosening and tightening the highlighted screws, to get the correct balance.


2

The lighter the gauge the easier it is to bend but that does not mean it is automatically better. I do find some of the finer dynamics of vibrato and bending are lost in the lighter string tensions. Sure you can bend higher easier but subtle vibratos become harder as a consequence. Also the loss of tension in regards to bending does make it harder to bend ...


0

This might not be it, but it might be worth a try. You said that the guitar is a couple of years old. My friend knows a luthier that works almost exclusively on G&L's. When my friend asked if he should use WD-40 to clean his pots, the luthier said no. He said to take each pot, and dial it from 0-10 and back to 0 again, 40 times. Each pot. What will ...


8

Yes, you can use thinner gauged strings to reduce tension and make the strings easier to bend. For electric guitar strings, the standard is usually around .009 or .010 inches for the high-E string (Sets are usually labelled by the gauge of the high-E string. The gauges of the rest of the set mostly depend on how thick the high-E is, but there are also ...


3

In general, smaller-gauged strings will come up to the same pitch at a lower tension. They're easier to bend. They'll also have less "oomph" as a consequence, but amplification can mitigate some loss of volume. As for technique, you want all three of your big fingers all pushing or pulling together. Don't worry about bending with a single finger alone until ...


4

Electric guitar sound is affected, among other things, by the way the wood absorbs the vibrations of the strings. The sustain and the brightness of the sound comes, in part, from the wood used. Availability, workability and visual properties are also important. The most popular rock guitars are Fender Stratocaster and Gibson Les Paul. Strat bodies are ...


7

There is no specific combination of wood types that make a guitar more or less appropriate for rock/metal music. Essentially all combinations can and have been used to good effect by various artists in these genres. Other features besides the type wood are likely to have a more significant effect on the the behaviour of the guitar; at most you could ...


4

There's one more important thing the answers so far haven't mentioned: a pickup's output signal doesn't follow the string movement simply in a linear fashion, but in a rather complex relation depending on inhomogenity of the magnetic field, coil geometry etc., and the closer you get the more nonlinear. The result is somewhat similar to a gentle but very ...


2

Generic pedals that are useful for all electric guitar genres are: Volume boost and Volume rocker pedal for solos and for adjusting volume on the fly. Overdrive for solos, tone coloration and sustain Chorus for shimmering effects and to soften the harshness of the overdrive


7

The line between Blues, Rock and Metal can be "fuzz"ier than you'd think. Effects can be broken up into three classes: Gain, Modulation and Time (GMT), and roughly, they are placed in the chain in this order. (If you place things out of this order and like the sound, you are under no requirement to change.) In the Gain section, Distortion occurs when the ...


3

Best advise I can give is to think about which artist exemplifies any given genre in your mind and research his setup. An often overlooked item is a graphic equalizer placed after a run of the mill distortion box. By cutting or boosting certain frequencies post distortion you can traverse between many classic rock and metal sounds. As an aside, the term ...


1

This is a subjective question, but my opinion is that there is only one essential pedal for a gigging musician: a tuner. Obviously, tuners keep you in tune, and they also serve as a kill switch so you can put your guitar down without worrying about feedback. I feel the best overdriven or distorted sounds are generated by tube amps, not pedals, for any ...


7

Effects are usually a relatively personal topic among guitar players, so you will probably get a lot of variation among answers to this question. I can give my opinion on the matter but it's always best to experiment yourself and figure out what you like the sound of. Generally I use an overdrive/distortion, a fuzz pedal, and a delay pedal for my ...


8

The signal between an electric guitar and a guitar amp is called a signal voltage. The voltage in the line oscillates in a manner analogous to the strings' vibrations, summed. The level of the voltage is dependent on lots of things including string material, how much energy is in the strings, and the electronics of the guitar. There is no specific standard, ...


1

You don't need both the NS-2 and the Decimator, pick one. I like the NS-2 for high gain stuff. The ISP Decimator is not really a true gate so I might just ditch it. Your chain should be something like: NS-2 > compressor > chorus/phaser > delay. This is into the front of the amp. Loops are too finicky for my tastes, but you could go NS-2 to amp input, then ...



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