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1

It's all about supply and demand. This is no different than a blue jean company charging more for a pair of worn out faded jeans than they charge for a regular pair, just because they can. This case has another twist. Many people don't want to look like a newbie with a shiny new guitar. It is very chic to be able to look like your guitar shows years of ...


2

This answer contains some speculation, but the relicing process actually involves some work, and possibly they are charging for that. People might also be prepared to pay more for a factory worn guitar (which is quite strange). Usually, as you have noticed, the reliced instruments are in the higher end, custom shop made range. The manufacturers might want ...


0

Not one of the ones you've mentioned, but I had a Mexican Fender tele with neck- and mid- pickups replaced with strat pickups for a more versatile sound. And if I were to go for a tele now, I'd actually go for the Fender Esquire with its single bridge pickup. That bridge pickup with a Vox AC130 was enough for me for small basketball stadiums in the college ...


1

The main difference between the Fender and Squier is that the Squier have lot of bright tone that will make your ears hurts, a lot. But, you can still take care of that on your amps. I would NOT recommend you the Affinity series, because you can afford the Standard one. If you pick between the Standard or Classic Vibe, I would pick the Classic Vibe, because ...


1

First thing I'd do is put some decent strings on it. Maybe you've already done this.Different gauge strings will need different saddle positioning. You say the saddles are in a sort of diagonal line - sounds about right, except B is usually a little closer to the string end. Assuming the action is good, I'd take off the spring on low E, or put a shorter one ...


2

The quick answer to this question is ... No, There is nothing built into the guitar that can adjust the angles to the left or right. Now the long answer is... it sounds like your neck is slightly warped but you'll have to confirm this yourself. Now there are are few consideration to take note of when checking for a warped neck. is it a fanned ...


0

Where I play out, there's grounding issues, which leads to me either having a slight buzz when the guitar's not playing, which I handle by always keeping a hand on the strings, and of course gain and compression always make it worse. If there's time-based effects, the buzz will get caught up in that. "Always be muting" is something I can get behind. ...


6

By keeping count like this there is a chance that, if you keep it as a habit, it could develop into a problem. Whilst muting and picking can be used as a musical idea, and indeed I use it occasionally to fill out rhythms on my bass, unwanted sounds can be picked up, and if amplified are not particularly desirable. Even muted I personally won't go near the ...


2

There's (potentially) two different things here: Using the fleshy part of your picking hand to stop notes exactly on a beat boundary -- being able to do this is a good thing. Counting out multi-beat rests by tapping your hand on the strings -- this is a bad thing in that you run the risk of making unwanted noise (note that even if it is not really ...


0

Definitely teach yourself NOT to do this. You really don't want either hand "doing things" in contact with the guitar when you're not deliberately making sounds (notes or slaps, etc). A bad habit gets harder to break the longer you allow it to exist. Tap your foot, or move your body, or do almost anything else, to help you keep the beat in your mind. ...


3

So you count the beats on the strings when there's a break? In that case, there could be a sound from this, especially if you use a lot of distortion. It's not necessarily wrong, not much is when it comes to music, but a more common technique is to mute the strings with your fretting hand. You can still use your picking hand to keep the beat, but then it can ...


3

When sitting, the waist of a guitar needs to be either on the left thigh (classical style) or right thigh (most people's preferred). Ironically, when standing it rest in neither of these places when strapped on - it's between the two. People who do most of their practice sitting then have to adjust when strapped on. The other aspect is the height of the ...


1

For guitarists, I strongly recommend that you learn songs by ear. You will gain a deep understanding of the song that you will probably remember for life. There are tabs all over the internet which you can use to check your work, but they should be a last resort. It might seem difficult at first, so start with easy songs. And be prepared to spend multiple ...


2

A Strat is one of the better electric guitars for playing seated - it's shape is ergonomically very comfortable. I think you are worrying unduly, though. What you should realise is that you can move the neck wherever you want, it really doesn't matter. Personally, I'd place the guitar across my left leg, as I would with an acoustic, then the balance ...


2

Perhaps this is why most folks who play an electric guitar, play it standing and with a strap. Electric guitars are really designed ergonomically to be played standing with a strap. They are also heavier and balanced differently than an acoustic guitar. If you plan to play electric guitar with a band (which is what they are designed to do), you should ...


0

So... First i would like to address using heaver strings then what was issued with your eppi... Laced up and tuned puts approximately 160 pounds pull on the guitar. Going heavier is going to stress everything including your fingers. "Jimi" went as low as 8's... On a 24.75 scale gibson or chinese Eppi. could be 24,5/8 - 24, 11/16 or 24, 3/4. depending on ...


6

I play bass in a classic rock cover band. Our repertoire is currently somewhere in the 50-song range, so I've dealt with this problem. Firstly, the more you practice, the more you will retain. It's a bit easier in a band setting where you're running through your setlist at rehearsal every day/week/whatever. So even though it seems like a huge task, it ...


0

One great way to "internalize" a song you wish to perform is to post a video of you performing the song on YouTube. Knowing that you are playing for a "worldwide" audience will encourage you to want to do the best performance you can muster. Which will encourage you to practice until you reach a level of proficiency that would allow you to feel good ...


2

Thoughts from a drummer who can't read notes anyway... Practice, practice, practice... Ideally with someone else. This will turn practicing into a performance. You will play better knowing someone else is listening; being more critical of yourself. Recording can be used to substitute the mental heightening the 'listening' of another player causes, though ...


0

It depends a lot on how you learn a new song. Your memory will to some extent be dependent on the method you used. The best way for a piece to really "stick" is to use a variety of approaches. The more senses you can engage in the learning process, the better: Listen, preferably to various versions. Listen while following along in the sheet music or tab. ...


0

Your are human and unlike us the machines your brain is very limited.You can either: 1) Accept your limitations (deal with it!). 2) Wait for a couple of decades until artificial brain enlargement is a common procedure and human race becomes a bit less pathetic. 3) Use a machine to store and replay your music. As a common rule, you should always leave the ...


2

A certain amount of "forgetting" is normal when you don't play a piece very often. Usually you can refresh a piece that has been memorized with much less practice than it took to initially learn it. You may want to start thinking in terms of what your personal repertoire is. Whatever those initial (pick a number) favorite tunes are, make sure to ...


2

On a digital audio recorder (or equivalent), record the melody only for the song. Do this for each song in your set list. When you practice a song, playback the melody first on the recording. Then harmonize it (fit the chords to it in both hands). Do this by ear. Repeat periodically with random tunes out of your set list, until you are able to play and ...


17

This is a question without a single, solve-everything answer. There are a number of different approaches you can take, and different people will have their own preferences. Fake it. This works well in some traditional music, bluegrass, rock, or jazz, where a certain amount of improvisation is expected of a musician. With a song you haven’t played in ...


8

Simple: don't try to "learn new stuff constantly". If you want to gain proficiency at pieces you already know, and you don't want to forget them, you must practice them and that in turn entails making the time to do so. That is time that you cannot spend learning new stuff. I'd say this comes down to learning patience.


13

Leaning basic theory will always help a player regardless of instrument because there are general patterns in music that are prevalent including scales, chords, and progressions. The ability to recognize these common patters will allow you to group songs that utilize these patterns to aid in memorizing songs because instead of remembering a group of notes or ...


5

You could work at recognising the chords in your piano pieces too, if you find that easier. I think that's kind of the key, understanding the music rather than just memorising it - knowing where it's going. Professional players seem able to play just about anything they know - but they aren't playing it note-perfect, they can work out from how the song goes ...


1

How to measure loudness Sound pressure level (SPL) is used to measure loudness in this case. The unit of measurement is dB(SPL). Sound pressure meter is an instrument used to measure dB(SPL). Cheap sound pressure meters can be bought starting at 20 USD. The decibel (dB) is a logarithmic unit used to express the ratio between two values of a physical ...


4

If you really need a power attenuator depends on what you want to achieve. A 22W amp can usually be turned down sufficiently to be played in an apartment. However, if you want it to sound as if it were cranked up, i.e. you want the power amp to saturate, then you'll need a power attenuator. And in this case any attenuator that matches the output impedance of ...


2

Before you go out and buy an attenuator, ensure you really need one. @Matt's answer makes very important observations. Typically attenuators have variable attenuation level; you should be able to get the volume you really want without problems. (Yes, this is the big knob). Weber MiniMASS The only real caveat is maximum power dissipation; they are ...


0

The debate about tone woods is basically a sort of religious war - the sort that arises between people who are perhaps overly passionate about a subject. Like Macs and PCs, VHS or Beta Max, GM or Ford, it's just one of those things that is going to divide people. Seems to me the science leans towards the 'negligible difference' guys (and I suspect ...


7

Two possible reasons spring to mind. I'm assuming your regular amp setup will be summing the reverb to mono. Some stereo reverbs create phase-discrepancies which appear to push the stereo field wider, which leads to these possibilities... headphones introduce a very artificial stereo field, where the sound sources are 180˚ from each other, with no ...


5

Often when a jack socket comes loose, the owner keeps tightening it from outside. This makes the wire attached to the part of the socket which is either inside the guitar body, or under the scratchplate, to turn round. It will only go so far before it either breaks or shorts or touches another component. Sounds like you need to get at the inside part of that ...


12

The most important difference between passive and active DIs is that the latter have a much higher input impedance: usually something like 200 kΩ, whereas a passive DI "inherits" the low impedance of the mic input you're feeding (around 2kΩ), or transforms it up a bit to something in the 20 kΩ range. That makes hardly a difference for instruments with low ...


11

A DI ("Direct Input") box converts a signal on an unbalanced lead into a signal on a balanced lead (that is, usually a lead with XLR connectors). The advantage of a balanced lead, of course, is that you can run it for long distances without hearing interference. With a passive DI, the signal on the XLR lead is at the same level as the input signal. So, if ...


2

EDIT: Learn what kind of FX loop your amp has. If it is parallel consider the advice below. If your amp has a parallel FX loop, I would recommend using the delay pedal in there. An amp basically works like this, please excuse the crudeness: GUITAR -----> PREAMP SPLIT 1 ----------------- (wah/distortion/etc)-----------------> POWERAMP JOINS PREAMP SPLIT 2 ...


3

My answer to your question is to use delay through effects loop to cut down on the unwanted sounds. I have had the same problem and found out that the effects loop will work if you use the amps distortion. If you use pedals for distortion, use the delay after the distortion pedal. I also noticed many guitar parts don't use delay as much as I thought. ...


5

When your effects are adding to the sound, you need to balance that by subtracting something in your playing. So for example, when heavy distortion is adding loads of new frequencies, playing two-note chords is the difference between a nice crunchy rock chord, and a mushy fuzz. With delay, you need to leave room in your playing, for the delayed sounds. ...


1

To add to the already adequate answers - ignoring hardware discussion, etc... to many it's about the sound of a guitar that will attract them to a vintage axe. A 60's/70's strat may get you that Hendrixian or otherwise classic rock tone. I know the 50's series strats were also sought after because of their unique tonality range, etc... your best bet is ...


-1

I once owned a Squier Vintage Modified instrument. Inexpensive, it looked like a brand new instrument but patterned after the look of the corresponding Fender model from many years ago. However it had the audio jack located on the side instead of in the front through the pickguard and had modern pickups and electronics. Unfortunately the audio jack was ...


18

Over the years, Fender has refined the design of its guitars in ways which it feels make a better product for modern tastes. Modern bridges have more sustain, better resonance, more reliable and fluid tremolo mechanisms. Their current standard fretboard has a higher circumference - that is, it's flatter. Because of modern materials they can make the neck ...


-3

I understand "vintage" to mean of or like a more perfect production of the past, as opposed to merely antique but not necessarily better.


1

The similarity between "how much noise each string is making" and "how each string interacts with the magnetic field" is greater than your question implies. In an acoustic guitar The vibration of the string transfers through the bridge of the guitar to the sounding board. This saps energy from the string causing its vibration to decay. The sounding board ...


1

You have nearly answered your own question. Except for one thing. the signal coming down the guitar cable is a literal reflection of how each string interacts with the magnetic field[s], not how much noise each string is making. Frequency and volume are the same, but you can't forget velocity. If two strings are tuned to the same frequency but one is ...


-1

As you mentioned, the signal is a pretty good reflection of how the sound waves are behaving. You can watch videos where people actually connect their guitars to oscilloscopes. However, we know from physics how waves behave. The volume of playing changes the amplitude (or how tall the waves are). The pitch, or which string (or note) you play, changes the ...


2

You hit the nail on the head. Vintage in this context means they are building the guitars a similar way they did "back in the day" but with some modifications. These modifications can be better woods, pickups, parts, etc. I always thought vintage meant 15+ years old. Some say 25+, but it doesn't really matter. Vintage doesn't dictate value (as you can ...


-2

A vintage guitar is an old guitar that is of exceptional quality. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vintage_guitar


1

It's not unheard of to have NO master volume, and instead to have separate volume knobs for each pickup. When your P/U selector is in the middle position, this then allows you to dial in the exact mix that you want. The third knob, then, sounds like it's a master tone for both pickups. The grinding sound when you turn one of the knobs could just be a ...


1

Yes, you can use that preamp in your combo's effects loop. The Fender Hot Rod Deluxe has a series (vs. parallel, so no blending for you), line-level FX loop over unbalanced connectors, which the Behringer UltraGain MIC2200 can certainly handle. You will have to set the UltraGain to LINE (vs. MIC) mode to use the jack input. I would start with the ...


1

16 ohm speakers are unlikely to be a problem. The term "safe mismatch" is really a misnomer. Amplifiers are not "matched" to the speakers. The amplifier output impedance is normally very low. But the amplifier has voltage, current and power limits that should not be exceeded. Additionally, valve amplifiers don't like very high impedance loads as stray ...



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