New answers tagged

4

This is one of the minor hazards with floating tremolos - they will go out of tune. There are a few partial solutions: locking nut - this stops the string slipping through the nut and catching sharp or flat knife edge trem fulcrum - reduces the possibility of slipping out of tune zero point trem - springs both directions try to return the trem to an in ...


4

I have seen musicians play on stage while barefoot. It depends on the venue as to whether that is appropriate or not. If you are in a classy music venue (Grand Ole Opry, Bluebird Cafe, Red Clay Music Foundry, etc.) or in a restaurant - the dress code might preclude going openly barefoot. But if it's a laid back outdoor concert at a music festival, there ...


0

The only way I can think that you'd damage it would be if you thought you needed heavier strings in order to play rhythm (you don't!). The wrong gauge of strings can bend the neck forwards, which would make the guitar harder to play - but even then, a good guitar technician can get it straight again, or changing back to the recommended string gauge would let ...


4

Musicians who play barefoot - Sandie Shaw, in the 1960's in the UK; Todd Agnew (US Christian singer) - and probably more. Our drummer plays barefoot so he can feel the pedals better. If electric shock due to being barefoot is a possibility, taking your shoes off is the last thing to worry about! Fix the electrical problem first! Some stages are a little ...


1

As with all bridges, the idea is to make sure the scale length for each string is correct. In an ideal world they would all be the same length, but string thicknesses and tensions actually mean intonation is not right if you do that, hence tune-o-matics and others have adjustment. The good thing about a tune-o-matic is that you don't need to be 100% ...


0

The gist of these answers is correct: try notes from the related key/scale or from notes in and around the chords; practice singing then playing notes into your tuner to make sure you're playing the notes you think you are. Another thing to think about is that melodies played on guitar just don't sound the same as when sung. I'm not sure if it's because ...


1

You cannot damage it with strumming (well, over time you can start to wear down the paintwork. A lot of time) Guitars are not designed to be rhythm or lead, they are just stringed instruments which can be played with fingertips, nails, or a pick (or a bow, an electric drill, etc) I have a nice 7-string RG, and while I play lead, some of our songs require ...


1

Some Harmonizer type tool is in there, definitely. With multiple tracks, and a fair amount of filter use. The distortion is reasonably easy to recreate though - I think I can identify 3 kinds in there: a fuzz and a 'metal' or very square wave distortion on a couple of layers, and overdrive on top of that. As Michael suggested, for 'Epic' stuff, multiple ...


0

They seem to be using a large amount of compressed gain and maybe even more than one guitar to achieve the full sound. I think there may also be a Whammy or some other pitch shifting device (e.g. Pitchfork or Boss Harmonist, ...) in play. There seems to be an 'ascending attack' which leads up to the chord, something you can obtain by pitch shifting ...


3

Distortion and overdrive is done by clipping the signal. So there really isn't a way to recreate this exact sound without some kind of electronic device altering the sound. This article shows some simple wave forms and what distortion looks like. http://www.howtogeek.com/64096/htg-explains-how-do-guitar-distortion-and-overdrive-work/ Resonator guitars ...


-3

not sure if this will work or not, but i'm having trouble with catching notes on bends atm, and I remember my mate used to put glue on his fingertips (and let ut set obviously) before he played. Research it before you go ahead and try it. Just a thought.


0

Along with the option of merely adjusting tension with the two screws on the left in the pics, the springs can be fitted with, say, one straight and another diagonal, thus having slightly different tension balance on the top and bottom strings. Not seen that set up used, but I don't nose around the back of peoples' guitars! At the time this vib. was ...


1

You mentioned QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE, FOO FIGHTERS, VAN HALEN. Well all I can do is give you my perspective based upon your question. We all want to sound either 'like' our guitar heroes or at least reach the 'standard' and sound as 'good' as our idols. Nothing wrong with that at all it means you know where you intend to aim, good call. What I want to ...


1

The critical parts of the guitar for sustain and tone are all between the nut and the bridge, so if you add any shaped pieces on anywhere else they will not make audible differences. On the very high end guitars, the "horns" and other bits are designed to resonate at specific frequencies so they will have an effect on sound, but for most guitars any effect ...


0

There are two main approaches to this: Muscle memory (technique) and biomechanics. They are synergistic. Muscle memory in your left hand is surely poorer then your dominant hand, due to the obvious reasons. To improve this would be simply to simply play more and do technique related excercises like picking drills and scales etc. Biomechanically, your ...


4

yossarian has mentioned why a bass might be tonally more appropriate than a guitar; I'll add that the string spacing (as well as the thicker, tauter strings) make certain percussive techniques easier on a bass. Remember too that the standard-tuned bass is seen by many bassists as not going low enough - 5-string basses starting at B0 are common, with ...


4

Normal bass is a full octave below a guitar. So if you're playing drop G on a 7 or 8 string, you're pretty close to the bottom of a standard 4 string bass. A 5 string bass will have a low B. So the simplest answer is that they're already there. However, that really only accounts for the pitch of the instrument. There are two other things to account for: ...


0

I'll leave the question unanswered for awhile to see if there are any other suggestions. I like the idea of a Transient Processor but I don't have one of those and they may be more expensive than a C9. In the meantime, I'll: split the guitar signal before the SuperEgo run one line into the SuperEgo run the other line into a Boss GE-3 amp pedal with the ...


4

No, certainly not. There's no need to keep the guitar in a hard case everytime. You can even keep your guitar on a guitar stand, since it is easily accessible rather than opening up the hard case everytime. Factors affecting: It is generally accepted that the air humidity should be neither too high nor too low and the temperature of the area should be about ...


1

What works for me is to lightly keep my palm (the bit for palm-muting) just behind the bridge, and anchor the forearm to the guitar. That way, there's a whole hand movement available, which is a little stymied when the pinkie is resting on the guitar. Also, it's easier to move to other strings. Anchoring around a knob means too much stretching if one needs ...


2

Many guitarists, including myself, anchor a pinky onto the pick guard in order to retain accuracy when tremolo picking. Some of the top guitarists, however (I'm including Malmsteen, Vai and others) don't anchor at all, they hold their hand clear of the guitar and use both forearm and wrist, which allows them much faster pick speeds than an anchored hand.


1

There is a type of compressor called a "Transient processor" that can drop or accentuate any sudden changes in velocity, most commonly drum hits. If you can find a guitar pedal one then you can add this to your live guitar sound and adjust it to only let through the "transients" which will be a click. Then mix it in with your synthesized sound.


3

There is no single correct way to do tremolo-picking. If you analyze how the greats do it you'll realize that everybody has their own technique. I'd suggest to watch videos of relevant players, and analyze their picking hand technique. From my personal experience as a teacher I know that lifting your palm but anchoring with one or two fingers (around where ...


0

There are guitar and bass guitar amps that feature multiple frequency dedicated speakers, and even multiple amplifiers. These ones are usually aiming for higher fidelity, as for amplification of acoustic instruments, jazz guitars and the like. As a bass player, I've tried and disliked some of these amps that featured high frequency horns because they tend ...


0

It's not straightforward to process a guitar sound into a click with traditional effects - so the click sound would probably have to be triggered separately. One way to do this live would be to split your signal before you go into the superego and route one branch of your signal into a guitar-to-MIDI converter (something like a Sonuus G2M, which is ...


0

You are using a synthesiser to generate your sound, so if the synthesiser doesn't have the feature you like then there isn't a lot you can do. The C9 you mention does provide it so your best bet is to get one of them. You may be able to get a part exchange on your current synth, or possibly sell it and make a profit.


1

Usually this is meant to mean something similar to 'Brighter Tone' as Johannes commented, but underlying that you typically have two factors: wider frequency range (which allows more of the higher harmonics to be heard) a frequency response which accentuates harmonics (by having a peak towards the higher end of the guitar range) All pickups have ...


2

The guitar will need to be fettled after changing strings by more than about 5%. This means the truss rod MAY need adjustment, and the intonation more than likely will too. About 35 yrs ago, I put much thinner strings on three or four of the electrics I used most. A couple have vibratos fitted, but that doesn't have to be problematic with thinner strings. ...


1

A difference in string gauge will affect the neck, this is very true. You cannot escape that fact. You have to be aware that the strings might be too thin for the saddle at the bridge(bottom of the guitar) and/or too thin for the nut at the head of the guitar(at the top of the fretboard). When the strings are too thin they tend to pop out of the nut(in my ...


-1

Do not wire different speakers in series. The sound output of a speaker is specified with respect to its driving voltage, and speakers' impendance tends to vary wildly over its frequency range. The only thing you know is that it will not undercut its nominal impedance by more than 20%. The amplifier is called "Valve King". Why? Valve power amplifiers ...


2

A Peavey ValveKing 20MH amp has a speaker output impedance switch which allows selection of either 16Ω or 8Ω speaker/cabinet impedances with 8Ω max on the 20MH. If you are considering wiring more than two speakers to the amplifier, you need to concern yourself with your amplifier’s ability to handle low impedance loads. If you ignore the way you wire them ...


6

It depends on the load requirements of the amplifier and the impedances of the speakers, neither of which you have specified. If the amplifier has a 4 ohm output transformer tap, or it is solid state and well-specified into a 4 ohm load, you can put 2 x 8ohms or 4 x 16ohms in parallel. Similarly if you have 2 x 16ohm speakers you can put them in parallel ...


1

No problem. I have hard cases for all my guitars, but the one I use most frequently lives in a soft-sided case because it's easier to move to gigs etc.; it goes into the hard case only if it's traveling separately from me - in an aircraft hold or a tour trailer, for example. This particular guitar isn't affected by humidity, so no worries there.


6

No, if humidity and temperature are kept with in a decent range then there's no reason to keep it in the case. The only reasons I can think of would be to prevent dust from gathering if you're not playing it much, or maybe to keep it away from kids/pets/guests. I keep some of my guitars out on stands and they're still in great shape after around a decade ...


1

Your entire signal chain into the DAW is mono, so any stereo effect you're having is coming from the DAW itself. I would check that the DAW does not have any sort of phasing effects, chorus, modulation, etc on a single channel (or both, if you also have it on your amp) which could cause phase cancellation on your audio source when played back with both ...


3

What device is indicated by 1/4" audio to USB 3.0? Do you have some kind of audio interface? That is almost definitely where your problem lies. Rarely do devices have 1/4" stereo inputs, but your Line 6 has a 1/4" stereo output. You probably have to get a splitter cable that has a male 1/4" stereo (TRS) connector on one end, and then either two male 1/4" ...


1

A sound example would be helpful here. In my opinion, you should record guitars always in mono, because mostly you will just have one mono signal (if you are working with one mic or a line in signal) If you want to have stereo, which is recommended, record two different tracks and set them to your left and right channel with a bit of variation in your amp ...


0

I truly prefer the 1st version. Since all my guitars have trems (I got only one with a FR), the first spring setup suited my guitars best ; the second one always put my guitar out of tune whenever I used the tremolo. The 6th string had too much tension, resulting in a sharp (de)tuning when I got the tremolo back into position.



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