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1

Realizing that my guitar was a mid-range instrument helped me find what I believed to be the most satisfying tones i.e. not chasing extreme treble or bass. I have found distortion is good for tightening up the sound a little bit, and higher distortion tends to work better for single note passages and diads than it does for chord work. In general terms ...


3

Paul Reed Smith has videos available where he talks about the effect different woods have on the sound of his electric guitars. (starting about 2:47 into the video) He demonstrates ...


0

I don't know if the material and construction of the body and neck lead to non-trivial differences in the sound achieved or not. The vibrations travelling through the materials clearly will behave differently but whether that difference is non-trivial compared to how the strings interact with the nut and bridge, the pickups & electronics, I have no idea. ...


0

I would recommend you to buy a real hardware tuner. In which you can plug directly your guitar for the best tuning. Thus, iPhone microphone might not catch the exact frequence, iPhone was not designed specificaly to tune guitar. So your tuning might be approximative. But IF, I mean IF you still want to tune your guitar with your iPhone, I recommend you to ...


2

If you have a guitar input for your iPhone, which your tuner app supports, then plug directly into that. If your tuner app has to use the microphone, then plug your guitar into an amp, so the microphone has something loud enough to hear. Get as clean a sound as you can, for tuning. Tuning via a microphone is problematic in noisy environments -- for ...


0

Are you plugging directly into the iPhone or are you attempting to have the iPhone's microphone pick up your guitar? It's best to eliminate the most extraneous noise possible. Using an amplifier can cause inconsistencies as you are relying on the phone's small microphone instead of a direct signal. Advice: purchase a pedal tuner or a digital Korg ...


2

Granted that your amplifier isn't terrible, it should be fine through the amplifier. What's more important is any possible sound effects that you have on it. Things like distortion and vibrato can cause difficulties for a guitar tuner to pick up the string's actual tone. This is why tuner pedals are usually the first pedal in the chain, too -- the tuner only ...


0

The question is "does the body of the guitar affect the tone?". The tone is composed of many frequencies which are present on the vibrating string. I believe there are two things that need to be answered to know if it does. What is the amplitude of the reflection coefficients at the two boundaries (the nut and the bridge) from 0 to 20 kHz on two ...


4

A good amp, apart from sounding good, should have a long life before it. So check all the controls: do they make a solid impression? Do the pots move smoothly, nothing is loose, and nothing makes noises it shouldn't? If every change in settings comes with its own sequence of "snap, crackle, pop", then this won't get better over time. How much noise does ...


2

Disclaimer: I'm one of those folks who always preferred multiple independent components over an integrated system for audio work. That said, I would go with stomp boxes and separate preamps for practically all tone control, and look for a power-amp&speaker box which is as close to the "wire with gain" paradigm as possible. Which means an amp that is ...


0

If the signal balance between your strings is uneven, the problem is more likely in the guitar’s setup than the string gauges. The Fender Guitar Setup Guide will show you the tools you need and what steps to take. For the adjustments I describe below, you’ll need a precise ruler, a Phillips screwdriver, and a set of hex wrenches. You’ve just changed the ...


0

Did the OP add the price-range part? I don't remember it. We think the answer to that is How do you identify a good guitar? If we excise that part as asked and answered, I'll be happy. I mean seriously, it's about like "I'm travelling out of the country. What language should I learn?" But there are things about the nylon-string "classical" guitar that ...


5

Although much of what I play might be more suited stylistically to an acoustic guitar than an electric, I much prefer playing my electric guitars with the neck pickup and a clean amp, to playing my acoustic. The guitar I play the most is a Fender Squier Bullet, purchased new on sale for US$100 (regularly $150 MSRP); it has height adjustments for the ...


4

One other thing that took me MANY years to realize. The best EQ and tone settings to please your ear in a room by yourself are going to be surprisingly different from the ideal tone when you play with other instruments, and especially when recording. For example, the best guitar sound when a keyboard / synth is playing chords is often much more treble than ...


1

A few things I can tell you, the first and most obvious is the cable. If you can decrease the hum/buzz by touching ANY metal parts and/or strings, then your guitar ground wiring is probably "OK", meaning it is probably as good as the manufacturer took the time to make it. But a crappy cable will always make things a lot worse, especially in an electrically ...


2

Since I'm not you, I don't know your muse and I don't know your wallet. So I cannot answer. There are strengths and weaknesses to each, to the point that I don't consider acoustic guitar and electric guitar the same instrument. With the electric, you have a wide sonic palate, with more and more companies and hobbyists making pedals to make finer shades of ...


0

This is not all about gear. Your guitar sound also depends a lot on your playing style. You want to have an agressive, metal sound: start practicing and get a flawless agressive picking technique before spending hundreds of dollars in gear!


0

The basic grounding wire for the strings may be with the string holder accessible when unscrewing the back panel from the guitar. That's where mine sits.


1

If by "song" you mean actual singing: How many solo players/singers with an electrical guitar do you remember seeing? How many with an acoustic guitar? Electric guitar is typically employed in band settings, split into "rhythm guitar" and "lead guitar", with lead guitar competing in frequency range, articulation and phrasing with the singers. So its main ...


7

Pick the one that you will have most use for. To use the classical guitar as a stepping stone to electric guitar, which many do, is an overrated approach in my mind. (I did this myself, since that's how it was done in school). Playing techno on a nylon acoustic sounds like a stretch, so that would imply an electric guitar. I assume it's monetary reasons ...


2

If you really aspire to become a good guitar player, I recommend you to choose a classical guitar. The basic techniques are easier to learn on soft nylon strings, especially if you aim for picking and chords (typical pop patterns). However, if your goal is to play fast and very diverse patterns and you just need that electric guitar sound in your music, an ...


2

Even if you feel frustrated with your playing now, you can always come back to it. I started playing the guitar in my late teens and could never really get into it, even though I had some solid experience with woodwinds and could already read music. I recently picked it up again in my forties, and I’m already better than I used to be. The main difference is ...


5

Two basic philosophies. First is, set everything at 12 o'clock (halfway) and adjust everything up or down until it sounds right. Second is, dime everything (all the way) and back things down until it sounds right. If it doesn't already. There are other things to consider. A common metal thing is to max the bass and treble and pull back on ("scoop") the ...


2

If you are using distortion then typically you would start by having bass, treble and mid set at halfway. Increase the bass and treble with no mid you will get the metal tone. Most players keep the mid, bass and treble pretty close in values with each other then adjust the settings slightly depending on the type of guitar and genre. I see most top 40 ...


2

The best way to get the sound you desire is just to play around with the settings. A rock sound makes me think of more overdrive usually, but it depends on your situation. You can get infinite suggestions for what people like to do with their guitar, but they will mostly all be different and ultimately you just have to listen for yourself to find what you ...


-1

Wood is the most important. If you don't believe it, compare the Gibson Les Paul, SG and 335 models. They have the same hardware, pickups, scale etc. The only difference is body wood, yet they sound completely different.


4

No reason. The power amps mainly boost the sound coming from the pre-amps. So they can be swapped. Why you need 350 watts for foldback is a question, unless you're playing 1,000+ venues or out in the open. Why haven't you just tried the idea?


0

If you want to record better sounding guitar tracks, getting an audio interface is the way to go, as others have mentioned. You also want to think about shielding, interference, and turning off electrically noisy overhead lights. However, to say "You can't just use an adapter to plug your guitar directly into your laptop" isn't true. I do this without a ...


6

when I plug the cable almost halfway of the adapter's body I can hear sound when I play Sounds like (haw!) a mono-to-stereo problem. Look at the 1/4 inch plug. How many parts? The tip connector and the sleeve right behind the tip? Now look at the 1/8 inch plug. Two sleeves? If yes, you are shorting out one of the channels. Go back to the shop and look ...


6

You can't just use an adapter to plug your guitar directly into your laptop -- the laptop's sound card is expecting either mic-level or line-level sound, whereas your guitar is a very high impedance signal coming in at a very low level (particularly if your pickups are passive). It's possible that your adapter is just faulty, but it's far more likely that ...


1

I agree with many of the above comments. There is no 'critical point' for learning guitar. You may be too old to make it as a member of a band like One Direction but that has nothing to do with the pleasure or learning to play an instrument. I wrote a short article on this here: http://stuartbahn.com/have-i-left-it-too-late/


-1

From my experience, the practice to avoid, whether with an electric or an acoustic guitar, is playing all six strings for all four beats (or all three, or all five, you jazz cats). Also, another consideration is whether you are playing by yourself or with others. If by yourself, it is good to distinguish between the down beats and up beats by playing a ...


0

Like any good wine taster can tell you, the palate is in the mind, not the taste buds. One needs to train their inner ear so that sonic finesse and accuracy can be achieved. The question is not asking whether or not this is a rule one must always follow, but rather if this is "good teaching". From a teaching perspective, YES, this is a good practice to ...


0

Raphael's answer is patently false. This stems from using distortion and/or overdrive on an amplified instrument. Power chords (or specifically the interval of a fifth) create a strong implied "almost major" overtone when distorted (asymmetric distortion; symmetric distortion creates additional harsh overtones which is why most people prefer the former). ...


1

An issue not yet mentioned is that in order to be useful, an acoustic guitar has to take energy from the vibrating strings in order to produce sound. Typically this is done by having the strings transfer some energy to the bridge which in turn transfers some to the front of the guitar, which transfers some to the air inside. The vibrating air inside then ...


3

I often find myself playing all six strings on electric. More than I should, even. I was listening to a Nile Rodgers tutorial the other day, and he talked about hearing cover bands play good times, hitting a lot of strings, and he says "No! I didn't play it like that! I played it like this!". It's hard to tell the difference, because he's talking and you ...


2

If you are playing with other musicians, playing all six strings at once will tend to create a muddy mix where it becomes difficult to distinguish who is doing what. Depending on the style of music, that may or may not be a desirable outcome.


2

6-string chords can work on an electric guitar. Increasing distortion greatly increases the chance that it won't sound good, but there are still situations where it can provide flavor. And that's not even considering alternate tunings. But I think your friend may have been trying to point out something important that took me a while to learn. Playing any ...


1

I agree with Dr. Mayhem, you shouldn't strum all 6 strings with distortion. When you play clean, it sounds great. But, with distortion, you lose some of the frequencies, and a lot of the notes get muddied. Its better to play power-chords or 3 note chords with an electric guitar. They just add more to the overall mix of the music.


1

An electric guitar can be used to play in many styles that would sound silly on an acoustic, or produce effects that an acoustic guitar simply can't match. Some styles and effects are apt to work much better when playing fewer notes than when playing more. As others have mentioned, distortion only works well when playing certain combinations of frequencies; ...


9

The only rule is, "If it sounds good, it is good."


24

The direct answer: No, this is not good teaching There is very little difference between electric and acoustic guitar. Playing all 6 strings can be absolutely fine on either. Many barre chords are 6 string. The question should really be "...shouldn't play all 6 strings together when using distortion" When you use distortion you add in harmonics which ...


4

Well, I don't see it as a key difference between electric and acoustic since I am not overly fond of just hitting all six on the acoustic either. And when playing the acoustic, I don't even have to share sound texture between lead and rhythm guitar. On the other hand: how are you going to start off "A Hard Day's Night" without playing all six? It's right ...


3

That principle stems from the fact that electric guitars, in a band setting, share frequencies (specifically mids) with a lot of other instruments. It's right up there with the piano, keys, vocals, even some horns and of course, with other guitars. So it is encouraged that as electric guitar, you should play differently i.e, find variations when playing ...


10

The very first thing to know, is to Never assume there is a certain rule you should or should not apply, of course some ways are better than others, but you can do and experiment everything you want, in music only comes to the ear is what matters. In case you have heard AC/DC songs before, "Highway To Hell" for example, open chords are played, they thing ...


0

I'd not bother. Bowing creates a special waveform that is quite different from that of a guitar, being more like a sawtooth (because it basically results from a stick and slide pattern on the bow hair: the violin is built to suck off and transmit much more sound energy than a guitar, so plucked notes don't have significant sustain). That's actually not ...


5

If you can play the parts on the unwound high E string, you can use a fiddle bow, as Jimmy Page did. Just remember to rosin the bow and use a cheap one as the guitar strings are hard on the horsehair. Another alternative is the Electro Harmonix SuperEgo which will allow you to adjust the attack (Gliss) as well as the sustain ("Speed"); Yet another ...


3

With e.g. a Roland GR-55 guitar synth and special pickup GK-3 you can get semi-convincing violin and cello sounds. Using midi you can connect to a e.g. a DAW and likely get vastly superior results through sound libraries. Not the cheapest solution, but probably closest to the real thing. Could be considered cheating though...


11

very simple answer... E-Bow I've had one for 30 years, there's nothing quite like it, but it is a technique in & of itself. You can do the standard 'never-ending note' by simply holding it over a string & sliding/hammering up & down the fretboard, but with a little practise you can make it sound like violin/cello spiccato by banging the string ...


7

The important part of a violin sound is a gentle attack at the start of each note. Some players use a volume or swell pedal to achieve this: the note is played just as the pedal swells the volume in. Others use the volume pot on the guitar. Strats and Teles are quite easy to do this on, as the knob is close to where the string is picked. Again, the string is ...



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