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17

For a long time, in popular music, a bootleg has been an unauthorised copy of some music. That would include unauthorised concert recordings, copies of masters stolen from record company archives, or just cassettes dubbed from commercial LPs. At various points in history, you'd find bootleg recordings as vinyl pressings, acetate pressings for DJs, as ...


17

Harmonic mixing is the practice of using music theory in your dj sets. You can use this knowledge to achieve specific functions when mixing two songs (similar to chord progressions), or to know which songs are compatible with each other, just to give a few examples. The most common and basic form of harmonic mixing. If you don't want to know about the ...


16

This is a difficult question to answer, because you say you already understand synthesis, and that you're good at it - so it seems you should already know what synthesisers are capable of, and how to make them do it. So you'll know there are many different kinds of synthesiser, and they can be combined - there's nothing to stop you from controlling an FM ...


14

Two main ways: Record the song in-studio and "DJ" the recording in the club. Bring your group to a club and play live using the synthesizers/samplers/drum machines you'd use in the studio. Both are seen, but most club scenes use the first model overwhelmingly, and have done so long before house music was developed, for many reasons: Electronic dance ...


13

This is actually called sidechain compression. It is usually applied to pads, or basslines with higher frequencies (but not always) and then a kick drum is often used as the 'input' for the compressor. The kick drum hits and just like when you listen to the radio, when the dj/presenter talks over the music, the volume dips. The attack, delay, hold and ...


8

What you need to be looking for are VST - Virtual Studio Technology - instruments. The good DAW's all let you use VST plugins to synthesise instrument sounds, using various parameters, including different breath pressure, volume etc. Many libraries are available for free online, you tend to get free ones with Digital audio magazines (often a DVD full of ...


8

Additive synthesis can be more than just stacking a bunch of sine waves to emulate an instrument. For instance are the sine waves following the harmonic series or some other series of harmonics? are the sine waves at a constant amplitude? are the sine waves in the same phase? The key thing to remember is that almost all natural sounds will have dynamic ...


8

It's similar to 'dirty' and 'clean' as far as electric guitar sounds go. A 'clean' sound will be pure in that there are no effects used - in particular overdrive, distortion or even 'crunch'. When , in the old days, valve amps were turned up to 10 (or 11 !!), the sound became distorted. Soon this became the 'I want' sound for guitarists. Thankfully, now, ...


7

The term "bootleg" has nothing to do with electronic music, per se. The term "bootleg", in general, means objects that are duplicated, transported and sold illegally. In the music industry, the term "bootleg" denotes something that is used in violation of copyright laws, especially something that is duplicated and sold for profit when the person selling it ...


7

A "clean" sound is close to a pure tone, with maybe some harmonics, like you get from a real instrument being played well. A "dirty" sound means that you can hear other tones or noise alongside the note itself. It might sound "crunchy" like an overdriven electric guitar with lots of feedback, or "farty" like a wind instrument being overblown.


6

General Midi specifies a mapping. Roland's GS standard adds to it as does Yamaha's XG standard. Your exact keyboard (and possibly drum preset itself) may vary. see http://pianocheetah.com/midi/drum.html and wikipedia:


6

As a compliment to what has already been said, I must add that the electronic musicians I know that play live as a one-man-band, they have their sequencer open on their laptop and have a midi-controller connected. The sequencer has their playlist loaded in in order and each song is split into stems. Stems are a sort of sections mixes. Fx: Stems: Bass ...


5

We are an electronic/techno/rock/industrial band who heavily use computers. In order to keep things fun and exciting for the audience, we split things out so we have: drums, some synths and backing vocals in Cubase, played from a laptop on stage. Generally not tweaked live, but often altered post-soundcheck guitar, rhythm guitar and bass live. All with ...


5

Start with some kind of software, after that, the important thing is: Make LOTS of music and don't ever stop. There is a relevant quote from Ira Glass about this: It is going to ...


5

There are analogue and digital synthesizers. The digital ones you'll likely be able to emulate faithfully through a computer, but opinions differ when it comes to analogue. There are both digital synthesizers and programs that try to emulate them, but many feel that it is not like the "real deal". There is also a big difference manipulating real keys and ...


4

The drumloop you hear on the track that you've mentioned is a chopped/edited version of an 'Amen beat'. Find a refill for Reason with a bunch of REX Amenloops and then mess around. It is common to remove the snare drum and the kick drum from the original loop and add your own kick and snare in place. (This is definitely the case in the song you mentioned). ...


4

There are two extremes: Play every note live (as acoustic musicians do) Press 'play' on a recording Most electronic musicians choose their own method, that's somewhere on the continuum between those two extremes. Techniques include: Playing parts live Looping pre-prepared sequences Manually triggering transitions from one loop to another Manually ...


4

There are many solutions but I would advise you to take a look at : Ableton Live + novation lauchpad/akai apc/akai push Maschine Or more hardware-oriented solutions : (electribe + mpc etc) Live enables you to trigger different parts of your songs. You can go from using it as a backtrack while you play an instrument to have each and every part of your ...


4

Those instruments appear to be a type of synthesizing Autoharp. If you read the brand name in one of the close-up shots, their instruments are Suzuki Omnichords. The newer model (the Q-Chord) does also have a MIDI output.


4

Pretty sure he uses FL Studio, at least for part of the process. Another popular option is Ableton Live. Madeon's samples are very meticulously arranged, so if you if you don't have a background in music theory or some natural gift for composition you might want to get your feet wet somehow. Any old book on music fundamentals will help, or more importantly, ...


4

You need to learn about sample playback software and virtual instruments for computers. There are hundreds of commercial products on the market that provide what you are asking about. The technology has been around for thirty years, although in the early days sample playback and virtual instruments required dedicated hardware keyboard instruments. These days ...


3

If I am focusing on the part you are referring to, this sounds a lot like a "talk box" (along with some distortion and perhaps an additional flange. A quick search brings up the term "Formant Filter" and also a video for a random product which shows the use of a formant filter as driven by a guitar: ( ...


3

Do a Google search and you can find many references on Frequency Modulation (FM) synthesis and how to use it, compared to subtractive synthesis, additive synthesis, and other types. Crude analog frequency modulation synthesis was a feature of some early analog subtractive synthesizers. However, a powerful form of FM synthesis in a digital implementation ...


3

Pretty much all electronic instruments today follows the "General MIDI" standard which includes a definition for which notes should control which type of drum sound. You can read about it on Wikipedia or on the official MIDI site's General MIDI Level 1 Percussion Key Map. This site lists the corresponding keys in a more human readable way. Let me repeat the ...


3

This is caused by a compressor effect applied to the whole mix. See: What Does a Compressor Pedal Do? In response to the loud beat, the compressor reduces the volume. Then after the beat, the volume ramps back up. This kind of compression causes a distinctive "throbbing" you hear a lot in pop, rock and dance music.


3

That is just a rapid arpeggio - most synths these days will auto-arpeggiate sets of chords you play in. The Access Virus synth does this quite well. I couldn't find the video sample I was looking for, but this should give an example.


3

It depends on what you're going to do with it. If it's just for home use and your own enjoyment, then you can do what you want. If you're going to try to sell it and call it your own (ie, a commercial venture), then there will certainly be an issue about copyright. Working out who owes who what is a hugely complicated area. If you're remixing a song, using ...


3

Like user2808054 says, if you're just messing around at home, you can do what you want. But if you're going to start publicly displaying your music (for money or not) a number of different rules start cropping up, such as copyright, and various other Creative Commons licences. Arrangements If you write an arrangement of a piece, you need to give credit to ...


3

It is not a matter of quality. You can get great sounds from a computer and many albums have been made on nothing but a laptop or even an iPad or GameBoy. Quality is not the concern. There are good reasons for wanting hardware synths, though, even digital ones. They start up instantly and generally never crash. They have many knobs and controllers for ...


2

The roadmap is correct even though it's never a straight line. If you like learning new stuff and are curious by nature everything will work out itself if you put in the hours and work smart. Look on MacProVideo and Sonic Academy. They all have a lot useful stuff like how to remix, music theory, sound design and synthesis, software and mixing tutorials, etc. ...



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