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9

The music industry is so much broader than you're making it out to be. Of course you can make a living in music—if you're willing and/or interested in being something other than a solo recording artist. You could, for example (and I'm just thinking of these off the top of my head; I'd be happy for others to add to the list): play 300 gigs a year, on the ...


4

Despite what common wisdom would tell you, there IS money to be made in music. Since the internet's turned music into something people expect for free your chances of making that money as an ARTIST are astronomically small unless your name is Justin Bieber or Taylor Swift. Luckily, there's a million other ways to turn your music into a successful career. 1 ...


3

One more option which hasn't been mentioned yet is to create musical equipment. For example, my first love is music but I got a degree in computer programming and I love that as well...so I put the two together and now I'm in the process of making mobile apps for musicians (metronome, chord progression generator, etc). I also have a guitarist friend who ...


2

The notes in your question form a G minor seventh (Gm7) arpeggio. Your voicing doesn't have the root note G as a bass note, but the fifth (D). The 'formula' for a minor seventh chord is root - minor third - perfect fifth - minor seventh (all counted from the root), which for a Gm7 chord gives G Bb D F (you used the enharmonically equivalent A# ...


2

If you want the best reward for least effort, I would start with the tempo track. Figure out how the music should be "phrased" at the level of individual beats in the bar, or even subdivisions of beats. Often the same rhythmic feel or groove will apply to many similar phrases, once you have found it. Changing the tempo by around 5% on individual beats often ...


2

I'm not sure this actually answers the question itself, but may provide some perspective as to what is involved in humanisation. The 'trouble' with humanisation, is often the sum of the individual humans making up the final groove - even if it was all actually the same human - in itself varies over time. The inaccuracies contribute to the eventual feel of ...


2

Well, there are only opinions for that question, no answers. my opinion is no. you might find a way to make enough to get by and people CERTAINLY do. But in my sampling of data on the subject, the people I know who make a living off music make a lot less than me. (I don't know any rock superstars). So my route was to become a computer programmer, find ...


2

It is a "Pocket Piano" synth made by Critter & Guitari. See the company's webpage here.


1

There are some common ones that will crop up again and again in almost all pop genres and I hear these in house quite a lot: (these are in Am or C for simplicity) C | G | Am | F Am | F | C | G C | G | Em | F F | G | Am | Am Am | C | Em | D By examination you can see the general theme is using C, Am, and F. 1, 3, 6 or 1, 4, 6 in the case of C progressions. ...


1

To elaborate, let's say I become very good, unspeakably good, at music That buys you a career as a studio musician. It does not buy you a record contract. You need to convey a message other than "good at music" for that. Take Bob Dylan, called by some critics "the worst interpreter of Dylan songs". Obviously, he still brings something to the table that ...


1

Chief issue with simple programmed and then "humanized"/randomized parts isn't the nature of the variations per se but the fact that the parts don't build their variance off of each other, nor do do previous errors affect downstream timing. Still better than a straight beat but you have to stick to very small amounts or it gets very noticable. Have you ...


1

You can do this with any cheap Soundmodule or Soundcard. Just go to the wind section of the GM module select a Panflute sound, put a low-cut filter on it to filter out the low end and EQ the high end to make it more aggressive. A compressor will give the sound an additional kick. If you are lucky your sound module does have a bottleblow sound as variation ...


1

Additive synthesis only looks so “spikey” when you do it in a quite naïve way: setting the phase of all frequency components to zero (or possible some other unfortunate fixed value). Even a random-phase iFFT will give you a pretty even envelope (though not quite the constant-amplitude thing you get with FM), and if you actually do a full ...


1

Most analog VCOs generate almost perfect mathematical waveforms (almost because of minor instabilities/noise but its usually below -60db). But you don't sample VCO, there are many elements in the signal path.. Like high pass filters used to kill DC, usually after VCO, mixer, filter. What you see is just a high-pass filtered "perfect sawtooth". You can try ...



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