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35

Wave is an uncompressed or lossless format, whereas MP3 is compressed or lossy. Technically .wav is just a container format and can hold various types of compressed or uncompressed audio, but typically you'll see it containing LPCM uncompressed audio (the same as on audio CDs). With .wav files, you are essentially getting a raw bitstream representation of ...


30

Computer: You're using one right now. You don't need a fancy new computer to make music. DAW: There are many free DAWs. REAPer is free if you don't mind a nag screen, Audacity is free and open source. Keyboard/Synth: You can get an entry keyboard for $100 that will work fine. VSTs: There are many free VSTs available from plenty of websites. Samples: Free on ...


27

They are not always the same. There can be differences in the harmonic content, in the wave shape, even if they are unnoticeable to the ear (or most ears). There are many different ways to generate the basic waveforms electronically, so in analog synths the actual waveform will depend on the design and implementation. I've also found that analog ...


20

It doesn't need to be expensive. Computer: You don't need an expensive system, and chances are that the one you are using right now is more than enough. I have used a 2GB RAM, 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo system for production (including mixing). The more powerful your system is, the bigger your real-time toolbox is: more channels, more effects, more programs, ...


10

Expensive compared to what? If you looked at learning sax, guitar, piano etc., and bought new, as you appear determined to do, you would shell out a load of money with those.Especially electric guitar, because you would feel you need a decent amp., then effects, et al. When you learned to ride a bike, you hopefully didn't go and buy a $3000 racing road ...


9

Let's first define Musique Concrète as: Music crafted from the manipulation of recorded sounds. You can find more in-depth definitions here and here. Where to start? Before we can manipulate sounds, we need to record them. Grab a mic and start recording whatever sound you find interesting. Falling stones, water, voices, rain, cars, wood, strings, ...


9

Learning production is like learning any musical instrument in a lot of ways. You first need to practice a lot to become very familiar with your software. The software is your instrument, you need to know it inside and out to become proficient at creating songs. For instruments, daily practice is the fastest way to improve, and the same goes with digital ...


8

Seems that you are new to the whole synthesis thing and you are looking for specific sounds found in other songs, so I recommend you to start with a software synthesizer that has a big and good library and macro support/dynamics. The library will let you choose from an array of well-organized pre-programmed sounds, and the macros will let you tweak those ...


8

This is going to sound rather trite, but… Put the gear away & write a song on the piano. You're suffering from a modern dilemma - Instant Gratification Syndrome. If it doesn't immediately make your music for you, you get bored. You have the gear, you want it to 'do something for you'. It's not going to happen. …alternatively - find a noise, any ...


8

This sounds similar-to (but more general than) the so-called Speech-to-Song effect, a musical illusion discovered and described by musical psychologist Dr. Diana Deutsch, whereby a repeated phrase of speech comes to sound like music. I think the effect you're discussing is a more general effect, since it involves any repeated sound, and does not necessarily ...


6

Well, if you're into commercial production within the music industry, it's pretty expensive. A hobby artist does not need expensive equipment at all. Your focus should be on creating the music, not the bit rate of your sample packs, save that for a re-mix/re-master, let the quality evolve. There are plenty of free resources to play with: ...


6

The executive summary of Charles' very detailed answer is: Use WAV for recording and editing. Use your audio editor's native file format with references to the WAV files to keep disk space under control use MP3 for distribution. 44.1 and 160kbps is lots, unless your audience has a home stereo that is worth more than their car and ears to match.


5

A lot of the defining sound of electro (and related styles) comes from harmonically rich sounds. You'll find distortion and waveforms with many harmonics. In contrast, house tends to be more conservative in that regard. And that's pretty much it. Electro will also tend to be more "intense", with faster tempos and louder sounds, but I don't think that ...


5

The first set of terminology, with intros, buildups, and drops, is a starting point most useful for describing a range of dance music that is instrumental (no vocals) or instrumental-driven (has vocals, but these are an element of the track rather than the sole focus). The second set of terminology (verse, chorus...) is a set of terms to describe the ...


4

See Matt's comment above. There are free DAWs and there are also DAWs that don't cost $750. If you're on a Mac, Logic Pro X is excellent and only costs $200. If you're on a windows, Fruity Loops is $99 for the starter edition which is fully featured, and should be more than sufficient for electronic music. Some of the higher models of Fruity loops also have ...


4

If you start out with trackers, there are free options. Renoise is commercial, but is used by e.g. Venetian Snares. That shows it can produce quite good results... There is a trial version of Renoise, but there are also other free trackers, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracker_%28music_software%29. I would say electronic music is easier to work yourself ...


4

I'm not an expert on this topic, but when Donna Summer recently passed away, I wound up reading quite a lot about her, in particular about the influence of her 1977 hit "I Feel Love", which was attributed with influencing everything that came after it that used electric instruments. I'm not sure how much was hagiography and how much with musicology, but it ...


4

Firstly - you need to recognize that actually - you're pretty privileged to live in this day and age of electronic music. Creating electronic music is far cheaper and more accessible than it ever used to be! ie. You can create electronic music with the computer you already own, I recommend a pair of decent speakers (more below), and a DAW. This is far ...


4

If you're up for using Linux, check out Ardour. It is an open source DAW, and costs 1$ or more (whatever you want to pay), so I guess it technically doesn't fall into the "those garbage free programs" category. ;-) It has been used by professional musicians and wannabes like me for years, and I'm very happy with the results. Just go check it out...


4

It depends. It's not important, in the sense that it is not needed. There are different input dynamics, you use the one that you are more comfortable with. It can be important, though. If you are not comfortable with piano rolls, sequencers, or performing the piece, or with any other notation/input system, and you are proficient with score writing, then ...


4

Unfortunately, the tools are not the key. E.g. Venetian Snares started out with a couple of ghettoblasters and low grade samplers. The first instruments of most musicians were low budget. Just cause you buy the best art equipment available, does not mean that you can paint. That's not to say all is lost for you, I can't possibly know that. But one must ...


4

There is no blanket answer to your question. It depends. "It depends" isn't very useful though, so let's try to dive a little more into it. Advantages and disadvantages Generally speaking: Sample: Less complexity, less flexibility. Synthesis: More complexity, more flexibility. But it's not that simple, and the weight of those cons and pros depend on ...


3

Kraftwerk were one of the first groups trying to make danceable pop music by electronic means and were hugely influential. Their 1978 track "Die Roboter" (from the album "Die Mensch-Maschine") still sound surprisingly modern after more than 35 years.


3

For me, beatmatching has two aspects, there's the "wide" tempo description, like - is this the pace of walking, running, marching - and that can almost start on a physical level - feel it in your body to get the general area pf the tempo of the track. Then there's the fine-tuning which is most western dance music is most easily achieved by comparing the ...


3

My foray into Musique Concrète will give you one thing to perhaps NOT do. While I was studying electronic music back in school in 1982 I came up with what looked like a very interesting term project. I had a reel-to-reel tape of Randy Newman's "Gonna Take Off my Pants", which I proposed to use as the basis for my composition, primarily because someone had ...


3

FLAC has nothing to do with FL Studio. Logic Pro X does not export to FLAC, either, for example. Generally an in-between program (possibly a mastering program) is used for such conversion. Any sequencer, including FL Studio can export to an uncompressed format such as WAV or AIFF, which are native, uncompressed formats. This is the highest possible ...


3

Okay, you, a piano, and some nursery rhyme that does not have a melody associated with it. Do it wrong, but make yourself set it to music. No one will ever have to hear it. If that sounds weird, look at an old folk tune like Go Tell Aunt Rhodie. Look at a hymn, like When I Survey the Wondrous Cross. (NO! I am not suggesting you take up farming or religion. ...


3

How would you find a collection of notes that worked, that didn't just sound like a kid poking a piano? That's just it. My field is slightly different (classical), but the way I force inspiration is roughly equivalent to "poking a piano". I have never actually worked at a piano (not even for piano pieces - I check them when I'm done), but the method is ...


3

I agree largely with the other posted answer, but from the perspective of someone who has messed around with electronic music to at least a modest degree. I have a lot of VST synthesizers (enough that I definitely stay directionless most of the time) but when I feel inspired to write . . . 'something' . . .I find it very helpful to start extremely simple. ...


3

I am going to answer your "in short" "how do I do notes?" with a much more simplistic approach - one that works for me when I compose melodies for songs I write lyrics for. Start by deciding what key you want to use. Your choice of key could be influenced by the feel you want to create. Many composers will use major keys for happy songs, minor keys for ...



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