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16

On older, two prong power cord Fenders, there's a 0.047 uF cap that you can switch in across the two power leads. It filters out some high frequency noise on the line. If the cap fails it can result in your amp's chasis, and your guitar, being connected directly to the mains. Possibly resulting in death. Here's a diagram for converting a 2-prong Fender to a ...


15

An important thing to note is the different types of valves can be changed independently of each other; eg: if you change the preamp valves you need not change the power amp valves etc. With power amp valves you will notice very quickly when one or more have gone. The amp will give out noticeable and unpleasant tones/white noises and will be reduced in ...


13

Tone pots are absolutely not useless. I used to think the same because I never used them, then I plugged my telecaster set to the bridge pickup into a new Vox AC-30 and experienced a shrill piercing nasty noise that somewhat resembled my favorite axe. Tone pots to the rescue! Albeit subtle, the effect you get from your guitars tone potentiometer is useful ...


12

Ahhh, I got it now. Guitar Amp Basics has a little note at the bottom of the "Tone Controls" section explaining that the presence knob actually reduces negative feedback on the tubes for the frequencies above the treble-knob's range. Then I found The 'Presence' control? on "The Gear Page" in which John Phillips says: The negative feedback loop in an ...


12

A potentiometer is basically a variable resistor. When it's turned all the way one way, it has no resistance, and when it's turned all the way in the other direction, it has its maximum resistance. A pot has three soldering points: its input, its output, and ground. So when the output of your pickups is wired to the input of the pot, the pot splits the ...


11

Sure you can. It would require some knowledge in audio programming and analysis. However, I would advise to not reinvent the wheel and use existing tools, such as BPM Counter (free). I'm not sure if it can write the BPM into the file name directly, but once it's saved in the id3 tag, it's much easier to access it with your own program and then rename the ...


10

With one of the early guitars I built, I used the 2nd tone selector (for the neck pickup - so I never used it) as the input to a small wah wah I built into the body. I could hook my little finger around it and use it as a fairly extreme tone selector or as a full on wah.


10

Those are x-y MIDI controllers more commonly referred to as Kaoss Pads. If you are familiar with a modulation wheel on a MIDI keyboard, you know you can assign that wheel to control any number of aspects of the instrument, from pitch bend, to volume, to vibrato, an LFO, or perhaps a filter. The x-y pad gives you two of those on a plane, with which you can ...


9

I used to pull off the covers on my old humbuckers, but, frankly, I couldn't hear a difference. I would hear a difference when I substituted new magnets. I think it's possible there is a very, very minor change, but in general you're more likely to hear a change rewinding the coils, replacing magnets, adjusting the pole-pieces, or using a more-metalic ...


9

Hum is produced in a couple of ways, and can indeed be related to a cold solder joint. If the hum goes away when you touch the grounding jacket of your guitar cable or a pickup case, then a cold solder joint or incomplete grounding is likely the problem. To fix this, you are going to need to localize the issue by identifying the cold joint. One way you can ...


9

Perhaps they are coil splitting switches? From wikipedia: Some guitars which have humbucking pickups feature "coil splits", which allow the pickups to act as "pseudo-single" coils by either short-circuiting or bypassing one coil. The electrical circuit of the pickup is reduced to that of a true single coil so there is no hum canceling effect. ...


8

It tends to mean it is a higher output pick-up. This would drive your amp/gear "harder" than the non-hot pickup, giving a more dirty/distorted (some would say more modern) tone. Like many things though, it is all relative. My Telecaster has "Hot" pick-ups, so they are more Rock than a traditional Telecaster pick-up, but they still have a lower output than a ...


8

The pre-amp valves do exactly that; they pre-amplify the signal from you guitar to a level high enough to be consumed by the power valves; tone adjustable's such as EQ, pre-amp gain and presence are all part of the pre-amp section, this is all done with analogue circuitry and the pre-amp valves amplify and apply gain to the result of you dialling your tone ...


8

It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


8

The signal between an electric guitar and a guitar amp is called a signal voltage. The voltage in the line oscillates in a manner analogous to the strings' vibrations, summed. The level of the voltage is dependent on lots of things including string material, how much energy is in the strings, and the electronics of the guitar. There is no specific standard, ...


7

Two additional problems I've seen with some people's tube amps, related to tubes going bad, is their sloppy manner of treating the tubes. Some people don't hesitate to use their fingers to pull a tube to inspect it. Finger oil, or fried-chicken grease, or dirt or whatever was on their fingers, will transfer to the glass of the tube, and begin to insulate ...


7

Looks like you have a little 10 Watt practice amp with a 6.5" speaker. I'm going to be straight honest with you: you may not be able to get rid of this issue. Harmonic feedback as I know it has a lot to do with volume. For example, you could have an amp gained out to obscene levels but at a low volume and never cause any harmonic feedback--so feedback isn't ...


7

For anything that can be powered directly (stomp boxes), do that. There are power strips that will lock down your transformer bricks, and also breakout boxes that will provide you directly with a number of DC terminals. Wireless mic battery packs should be replaced for each performance. Unless you're only performing for a small group of people and the space ...


7

I have read much about the Telecaster, but I still don't know what Leo Fender was thinking. I know that Seth Lover was thinking the same thing, as PAF humbuckers had covers too. It was only into the 70s when you started seeing pickups with their covers removed. Even Strat pickups are covered, albeit with plastic. In part, the nickel cover was to make the ...


7

Stage monitors generally come in two varieties- powered and unpowered. The first need AC power (220v in U.K.) to run, just as an ordinary guitar amp., p.a. etc. would.The other is passive, in that it is a speaker cab.As such, it will need an amp. externally to run it, as well as being connected, often by jack plug, to the sound out. Phantom power is DC, and ...


6

Biasing an amplifier basically means adjusting the current that flows through the tubes to match the tubes' operating parameters and the particular sound you want to get out of the amp. You can do it yourself, but from what I'm reading, you need to have a decent understanding of electronics. Replacing tubes in your amp will likely mean you will need to ...


6

DRL's answer is a good summary of pre-amp/power-amp/rectifier tubes. Here are some specific examples of tubes used and how they affect tone. For the pre-amp, far and away the most popular tubes used are 12AX7's, although sometimes you see 12AT7's used to drive the reverb or effects loop (if the amp has these features). For the power amp section, the tubes ...


6

It's possible the pickup selector switch has a dirty contact for the front-pickup when in the middle position. I have an old Ibanez that does the same thing sometimes when I switch to the neck pickup. I haven't seen what type of switch Epiphone guitars use, but my Les Pauls had an open-back switch, so it was possible to take off the switch cover and ...


6

My job involves helping my boss film academic talks and presentations. This involves ensuring that our cameras and wireless mics and whatnot do not die. Our rationale is that the potential cost of having batteries of an unknown age run out during a recording is greater than the cost of just replacing them every time we shoot. I personally tend to use the ...


6

I have replaced a few of these, and all I use is a pair of long nose pliers with a piece of cloth over the jaws. It is very easy to avoid scuffing the tightening ring or the surface of the scratch plate. The tool itself is just not worth the money- it only does one thing, whereas a pair of pliers and a cloth can live in your guitar case as part of your ...



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