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14

On older, two prong power cord Fenders, there's a 0.047 uF cap that you can switch in across the two power leads. It filters out some high frequency noise on the line. If the cap fails it can result in your amp's chasis, and your guitar, being connected directly to the mains. Possibly resulting in death. Here's a diagram for converting a 2-prong Fender to a ...


11

An important thing to note is the different types of valves can be changed independently of each other; eg: if you change the preamp valves you need not change the power amp valves etc. With power amp valves you will notice very quickly when one or more have gone. The amp will give out noticeable and unpleasant tones/white noises and will be reduced in ...


11

A potentiometer is basically a variable resistor. When it's turned all the way one way, it has no resistance, and when it's turned all the way in the other direction, it has its maximum resistance. A pot has three soldering points: its input, its output, and ground. So when the output of your pickups is wired to the input of the pot, the pot splits the ...


10

Ahhh, I got it now. Guitar Amp Basics has a little note at the bottom of the "Tone Controls" section explaining that the presence knob actually reduces negative feedback on the tubes for the frequencies above the treble-knob's range. Then I found The 'Presence' control? on "The Gear Page" in which John Phillips says: The negative feedback loop in an ...


9

Hum is produced in a couple of ways, and can indeed be related to a cold solder joint. If the hum goes away when you touch the grounding jacket of your guitar cable or a pickup case, then a cold solder joint or incomplete grounding is likely the problem. To fix this, you are going to need to localize the issue by identifying the cold joint. One way you can ...


9

I used to pull off the covers on my old humbuckers, but, frankly, I couldn't hear a difference. I would hear a difference when I substituted new magnets. I think it's possible there is a very, very minor change, but in general you're more likely to hear a change rewinding the coils, replacing magnets, adjusting the pole-pieces, or using a more-metalic ...


9

Perhaps they are coil splitting switches? From wikipedia: Some guitars which have humbucking pickups feature "coil splits", which allow the pickups to act as "pseudo-single" coils by either short-circuiting or bypassing one coil. The electrical circuit of the pickup is reduced to that of a true single coil so there is no hum canceling effect. ...


8

It tends to mean it is a higher output pick-up. This would drive your amp/gear "harder" than the non-hot pickup, giving a more dirty/distorted (some would say more modern) tone. Like many things though, it is all relative. My Telecaster has "Hot" pick-ups, so they are more Rock than a traditional Telecaster pick-up, but they still have a lower output than a ...


8

Tone pots are absolutely not useless. I used to think the same because I never used them, then I plugged my telecaster set to the bridge pickup into a new Vox AC-30 and experienced a shrill piercing nasty noise that somewhat resembled my favorite axe. Tone pots to the rescue! Albeit subtle, the effect you get from your guitars tone potentiometer is useful ...


8

Those are x-y MIDI controllers more commonly referred to as Kaoss Pads. If you are familiar with a modulation wheel on a MIDI keyboard, you know you can assign that wheel to control any number of aspects of the instrument, from pitch bend, to volume, to vibrato, an LFO, or perhaps a filter. The x-y pad gives you two of those on a plane, with which you can ...


7

Looks like you have a little 10 Watt practice amp with a 6.5" speaker. I'm going to be straight honest with you: you may not be able to get rid of this issue. Harmonic feedback as I know it has a lot to do with volume. For example, you could have an amp gained out to obscene levels but at a low volume and never cause any harmonic feedback--so feedback isn't ...


7

For anything that can be powered directly (stomp boxes), do that. There are power strips that will lock down your transformer bricks, and also breakout boxes that will provide you directly with a number of DC terminals. Wireless mic battery packs should be replaced for each performance. Unless you're only performing for a small group of people and the space ...


6

The pre-amp valves do exactly that; they pre-amplify the signal from you guitar to a level high enough to be consumed by the power valves; tone adjustable's such as EQ, pre-amp gain and presence are all part of the pre-amp section, this is all done with analogue circuitry and the pre-amp valves amplify and apply gain to the result of you dialling your tone ...


6

Biasing an amplifier basically means adjusting the current that flows through the tubes to match the tubes' operating parameters and the particular sound you want to get out of the amp. You can do it yourself, but from what I'm reading, you need to have a decent understanding of electronics. Replacing tubes in your amp will likely mean you will need to ...


6

It's possible the pickup selector switch has a dirty contact for the front-pickup when in the middle position. I have an old Ibanez that does the same thing sometimes when I switch to the neck pickup. I haven't seen what type of switch Epiphone guitars use, but my Les Pauls had an open-back switch, so it was possible to take off the switch cover and ...


6

My job involves helping my boss film academic talks and presentations. This involves ensuring that our cameras and wireless mics and whatnot do not die. Our rationale is that the potential cost of having batteries of an unknown age run out during a recording is greater than the cost of just replacing them every time we shoot. I personally tend to use the ...


6

I have read much about the Telecaster, but I still don't know what Leo Fender was thinking. I know that Seth Lover was thinking the same thing, as PAF humbuckers had covers too. It was only into the 70s when you started seeing pickups with their covers removed. Even Strat pickups are covered, albeit with plastic. In part, the nickel cover was to make the ...


6

I have replaced a few of these, and all I use is a pair of long nose pliers with a piece of cloth over the jaws. It is very easy to avoid scuffing the tightening ring or the surface of the scratch plate. The tool itself is just not worth the money- it only does one thing, whereas a pair of pliers and a cloth can live in your guitar case as part of your ...


5

Advantages to the user of PTP: you can maintain it much more easily. You can simply see the signal path and often component spacing is less fiddle. Potential advantages in PCB design is often easier to make robust circuits. Broad generalisation, but a well made circuit board can be very resistant to drop damage, whereas a larger layout PTP may suffer from ...


5

A fuzz pedal, when silicon v. germanium is brought up, almost always refers to a "Fuzz Face" circuit. This is an extremely simple circuit, with no input buffer, two transistors, a few capacitors and, I think, 5 resistors. There's also to potentiometers. Silicon v. germanium in this refers to the type of transistors used. Germanium transistors pre-date ...


5

DRL's answer is a good summary of pre-amp/power-amp/rectifier tubes. Here are some specific examples of tubes used and how they affect tone. For the pre-amp, far and away the most popular tubes used are 12AX7's, although sometimes you see 12AT7's used to drive the reverb or effects loop (if the amp has these features). For the power amp section, the tubes ...


5

Two additional problems I've seen with some people's tube amps, related to tubes going bad, is their sloppy manner of treating the tubes. Some people don't hesitate to use their fingers to pull a tube to inspect it, using their fingers. Finger oil, or fried-chicken grease, or dirt or whatever was on their fingers, will transfer to the glass of the tube, ...


5

I can see why, in an esoteric, strictly technical, way it would help, because having the tubes pushing/pulling equally should create better sound. The question I have is, how far out of balance can the tubes be before the sound suffers? When I started playing, way back when, we'd replace tubes by grabbing some from the electronics store shelf and stick them ...


4

The hum you are hearing is probably the alternating current from the mains adapter. The reason there is no hum with the battery is because batteries are direct current, and have no oscillations in the current. My suggestion would be to move the pedals away from the mains plug, or anything large and metal (laptops, televisions, radiators). Or you could try ...



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