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8

They vary quite a lot. The basic ones - but still usually good - are just a sort of springy steel that clips onto the neck of the jack plug. In itself, that part can be bent so that the clip action is stronger, although if you go too far, the plug jams on that part of the mechanism. A problem I've found is that occasionally the neck on the plug is quite ...


5

Modulation is not an effect. Modulation is the process of varying one or more properties of something, in this case the sound of a guitar. Effects are achieved through modulation (variation, change) of some property of the sound (like the phase, harmonics, frequency, amplitude, etc), but modulation itself is not an effect. This is very important to note to ...


3

Short answer: Yes, but... The first guitar I bought was a Peavey Predator, a bottom-of-the-line, budget Strat clone. Several years later I came across a good deal on Fender Custom Shop Strat pickups, so I got them to put in the Predator. Yes, it did improve the sound a lot, but like your guitar the frets were very worn, the tuning machines were terrible, ...


2

Any compressor unit that has a sidechain input should work fine for this. Essentially, the kick drum mic is routed to the side chain input of the guitar's compressor. If you are using a mixer you should be able to do this while also routing your kick to the main PA speakers as well (either via an aux send or a direct line output). The kick drum would then ...


2

It is sometimes done with kick and bass guitar in rock mixes and it's called "ducking the bass". Basically you need a compressor with a side chain input and you set it so that the bass volume decreases when there is a kick hit. This Sound on Sound article has some information on the technique (under the "Ducking the Bass" heading).


2

Your mileage may vary, of course, but for what it's worth, here are my impressions: We have a couple of Yamaha silent pianos at our home (ordinary stringed pianos with a MIDI interface: one grand and one upright), as well as a digital keyboard with an ordinary piano action. It might be a little harder to play soft, but the difference is pretty small, as ...


2

The speaker wire that runs from your amp to the speaker is a two conductor wire meaning that it has a side for the positive and negative terminal on the Speaker. The objective is to supply the electrical current to the terminals. To do that you need a solid contact. The existing connectors have a female terminal that conveniently slides over the male ...


2

That circuit is horribly wrong: The connections to pins 4 and 5 of the MIDI connector are exchanged (and that connector is labelled wrong). RB must be 220 Ω. The CNY17 optocoupler is often too slow; use a H11L1, or better a 6N137. RD is too large unless you're using a really fast optocoupler. But when you're using a correct circuit (see, for example, ...


2

You can probably find documentation on the web detailing the electronics layout of your guitar. You should do this and find out the impedance of your current pots. Alternatively, look in the control cavity if it is a solid body. Your new pickups should work fine with lower-valued pots. Switching to higher valued pots won't necessarily give you much in the ...


1

Have you seen this link, by the way? (Doesn't answer your question directly but may be interesting. It also mentions pickup hum...) http://www.sustain-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/What-Are-Low-Impedance-Pickups-by-Helmuth-Lemme-SUSTAIN-Magazine-2.pdf If your Ibanez curreently has really low value Tone & Vol pots, you might need to change ...


1

You will know. It will start to sound truly terrible, or even go silent. When it does you need to isolate which one it is, which can be tricky unless you have two channels, in which case the one that moves the problem from one channel to the other when you swap it between channels is the one. This rarely happens unless there has been physical damage, or a ...


1

There are different sizes of spade connectors, so one solution would be to change the connector on the amp wire. However, to do this it could be crimped, or soldered properly. If it's soldering, then you might as well cut the offending connector off and solder the wire direct to the speaker. It's a better job, done properly, as the speaker may well not get ...


1

I can get huge amounts of sustain using just a Keeley Compressor and what is basically an 808 Tube Screamer by another name (it's a Maxon with the same chip). It definitely doesn't sound or feel like a cranked Plexi. As the other answer points out, nothing will re-create that. But you can get a different long-lasting violin-like sustain tone, even at lower ...


1

In all honesty, you won't get a tone all too similar at a reasonable to what you get from your Plexi at maxed volumed. A lot of that sustain and compression/sag comes from the power amp tubes being pushed hard, the speakers moving a lot (as well as having been broken in) and also having a tube in the rectifier position. You can get a reasonable tone using a ...



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