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Okay, I now know how to do this, although it will take me some time to implement. This case is for having an acoustic drummer set the tempo on the RC 300. First, get an piezoelectric acoustic drum trigger and mount it on the snare rim. Second, hook the drum trigger up to a midi percussion module with a midi out that has configurable midi messages. Third, ...


2

In addition to the other answers regarding the creative implications of pitch-shifting drum sounds, you can also choose the pitch of a drum to stop phase issues in the track. For example, if you layer different kicks on top of each other, you may find that it loses its punch. Changing the pitch of one of the samples can get the kicks complementing each ...


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As other answers have said, drums used in a drum kit are essentially treated as unpitched. Certainly, they wouldn't usually be retuned for songs/pieces in different keys, as you would do with timpani (kettle drums), for instance. However, a drummer colleague of mine told me some time ago that he tunes his kit differently depending upon what style if music ...


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If you are making music as an artist, you may pitch the drums however you feel compliments the rest of the sound. Don't be afraid to pitch them down or up even a whole octave to get some weird effects... Here are a few tricks I use on drums to experiment with the pitch: Pitch layering - Often times I will clone a drum or even a whole kit, then pitch adjust ...


2

While the specific pitches of drums could certainly have a some impact on the music — small consonance changes with the other instruments, "feel" — tuning real drums is more about tension than pitch to my understanding. Since you're working digitally, you can adjust the pitch a bit without needing to over-loosen or over-tighten a real drum, ...


14

Drums have pitches, but by the time they are in the track, then unless it is for very specific purposes, to complement a melodic line etc, then those actual pitches should not be truly apparent to the end-listener. Let the listener just get the 'vibe' of what you intend. They shouldn't really be hearing a 'tune' from the drum pitches, only the apparent ...



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