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5

Breath control, breath control, breath control! I recall one of the top University Marching Band directors talking to us (Midwestern Music & Art Camp circa 1970 :-) ) about his "aha" moment. He was a trumpeter & got a summer job (high school or college age for him) with a circus orchestra. First couple performances, his embouchure collapsed ...


4

Absolutely. JB Arban once said that people have the wrong idea about embouchure - that it's a fixed thing like a statue. He said that embouchure is fluid - you need to do what's right and what sounds good. I am not surprised that you have difficulties with flute after trombone; remember how each instrument works: The flute is like a fickle bottle - you ...


2

1. Hearing If you know how the part is supposed to sound (either because you've heard it before, or because you can read music sufficiently well to hear the melody in your head), then you can obviously notice when the sound you play does not match. It can be a problem if you are playing in a very loud ensemble and can't really hear yourself (think 3rd ...


1

Definitely. There are lots of people who play all of the woodwinds (maybe not bassoon) very well; modern musicals almost exclusively call for this kind of doubling. In fact, it's kind of unusual to find professional saxophonists or clarinetists that aren't at least competent at the other, though admittedly those instruments are remarkably similar. And ...


1

An exercise I've been given by my trumpet teacher that is specifically for strengthening lip muscles is to put a pencil in your mouth and attempt to hold it horizontally using only your lips. It is quite difficult at first but makes no noise, requires little equipment and can be done while doing something else.


1

I play (with varying degrees of success) basically all of the winds. It may take some time to get used to switching between the two, but ultimately this shouldn't be a problem. The one thing that will change is that as you get better at trumpet, your embouchure will get stronger, so you'll have to relax more for single reeds. However, this will be a very ...


1

When I first started playing, I had much of the same problem as you. In fact, for the first month, I played every last partial wrong and I sounded terrible. However, I started going to the lowest partial I could hit (low C). I counted up from there. I had to do this before every piece for a while to "find my place". After that, I knew by listening whether I ...


1

Being a brass player myself, I found the best way to develop my pedal tones was just to relax and get air flowing through the instrument.


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Do Nothing!! Claude Gordon (is quoted in the article below) states that you should not be focusing on lipping any of the notes, ever, when playing pedal tones, and that you should simply focus on loose lips and steady air flow. The article in which these techniques can be elaborated on is ...



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