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30

Computer: You're using one right now. You don't need a fancy new computer to make music. DAW: There are many free DAWs. REAPer is free if you don't mind a nag screen, Audacity is free and open source. Keyboard/Synth: You can get an entry keyboard for $100 that will work fine. VSTs: There are many free VSTs available from plenty of websites. Samples: Free on ...


19

It doesn't need to be expensive. Computer: You don't need an expensive system, and chances are that the one you are using right now is more than enough. I have used a 2GB RAM, 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo system for production (including mixing). The more powerful your system is, the bigger your real-time toolbox is: more channels, more effects, more programs, ...


18

A good multi-tool, like one by Leatherman, is a nice addition to your case. They include slot and phillips head screwdrivers, pliers, diagonal cutters (good for emergency wire stripping), a file (useful for fingernails). In addition, I throw in a small set of real diagonal cutters for changing strings, because they work more easily than the one on the ...


10

Expensive compared to what? If you looked at learning sax, guitar, piano etc., and bought new, as you appear determined to do, you would shell out a load of money with those.Especially electric guitar, because you would feel you need a decent amp., then effects, et al. When you learned to ride a bike, you hopefully didn't go and buy a $3000 racing road ...


10

On top of everything else, it is always useful to have a kit of Allen keys, like these ones are very useful. The smaller ones are used for adjusting action and intonation on some types of guitar bridges, the larger ones, are for adjusting truss rods, if you do that sort of thing yourself.


7

To add to @the Tin Man's already awesome answer, you can try this little guy out for all the nuts/sockets on your guitar. I don't have personal experience with it, but the concept seems sound. I usually keep one of these in my guitar case. It's great for doing on the spot setups for other players, and double checking to make sure my own instrument is ...


7

When using an amp with microphone, it means that you play the guitar through a physical amp, and using a microphone to direct this sound into your recording system. An amp simulator is software that literally simulates an amp; you plug your guitar into your computer (through an interface for better quality), and this sound is modified by the software that ...


7

The answer is: It depends. A good amp connected to a good cab in a good room will sound good through a well placed good mic connected to a good preamp. I don't believe that any amp sim can beat that yet. But that's a lot of variables, many things can go wrong, it's not very hard but certainly not trivial. To me, a good amp simulator sounds way better than ...


6

Well, if you're into commercial production within the music industry, it's pretty expensive. A hobby artist does not need expensive equipment at all. Your focus should be on creating the music, not the bit rate of your sample packs, save that for a re-mix/re-master, let the quality evolve. There are plenty of free resources to play with: ...


6

Considering that it's the same mouthpiece you used in elementary school, mouthpieces models for beginning instrumentalists are sometimes selected on the smaller side (smaller mouth + smaller mouthpiece = better chance of success!) There are several reasons why you should invest in a larger mouthpiece, and below are a few: Horn mouthpieces are cheap - not ...


5

Remove the battery. I think it is set to some other base pitch for a transposing instrument, like an E-flat clarinet, so while it is probably calibrated correctly, it is not displaying the same note names as on the piano. I don't think A=440 or A=450 or some other tuning is the issue. You want to get it back into "guitar" mode. Usually the easiest way to ...


5

Here is what I have in my kit (although I am sure my kit is probably a little overkill) and to be honest I don't use all of these tools, they're just there in-case I need them. Battery powered string winder. (kind of looks like a cordless drill) handy for getting your guitar stringed up fast. ToneGear String Cleaner or GHS Fast Fret. Handy for cleaning ...


5

The answer may surprise you: colour Really, it gives you the option to avoid light coloured rosin dust on your instrument. Useful if you have a very dark instrument.


5

Tronical. You can buy one directly from the Tronical company to install on your existing guitar, or you can buy certain models of Epiphone and Gibson guitars with a Tronical tuner already installed. Gibson and Epiphone market them under the trade-name "Min-ETune".


4

See Matt's comment above. There are free DAWs and there are also DAWs that don't cost $750. If you're on a Mac, Logic Pro X is excellent and only costs $200. If you're on a windows, Fruity Loops is $99 for the starter edition which is fully featured, and should be more than sufficient for electronic music. Some of the higher models of Fruity loops also have ...


4

If you have access to a looper pedal, such as the Boss RC series, they have a line in. Connect the pedal to the looper, and then your MP3 player to the line in of the loop pedal.


4

If you start out with trackers, there are free options. Renoise is commercial, but is used by e.g. Venetian Snares. That shows it can produce quite good results... There is a trial version of Renoise, but there are also other free trackers, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracker_%28music_software%29. I would say electronic music is easier to work yourself ...


4

Firstly - you need to recognize that actually - you're pretty privileged to live in this day and age of electronic music. Creating electronic music is far cheaper and more accessible than it ever used to be! ie. You can create electronic music with the computer you already own, I recommend a pair of decent speakers (more below), and a DAW. This is far ...


4

Pitch shift pedals usually do not give a natural detuned sound. There are pedals dedicated for getting a natural detuned sound, like the Digitech Whammy DT or Morpheus DropTune. I haven't used one, so I can't back up their claims.


3

Disclaimer up front: I work for the company that makes these devices, but also use the software they run myself regularly. Have a look at the MusicOne or MusicOne CV. You do lose a degree of portability over a tablet in going for a larger screen size. The problem of rendering speed is overcome by importing the PDF files or scanning the originals into a ...


3

In addition to the Roadie Rench, I have a microfiber cloth (for wiping off the guitar), a CLEAN cotton diaper (for wiping my face and hands), a bar towel (for spills etc.), a spare guitar cable, a spare speaker cable, a spare set of new strings (and the last set pulled off), a dull sharpie pen (for my friends use), a sharp sharpie pen (for me!), a cheap back ...


3

Your cabinet is designed to accept the very quiet signal from a guitar pickup. Instead you are sending it the line-level signal from your pedal. Your cabinet is designed to add colour to a clean signal. Instead you are sending it a signal that already has all the colour and tone you want. Assuming you definitely want to use your pedal, the ideal would be ...


3

If you're up for using Linux, check out Ardour. It is an open source DAW, and costs 1$ or more (whatever you want to pay), so I guess it technically doesn't fall into the "those garbage free programs" category. ;-) It has been used by professional musicians and wannabes like me for years, and I'm very happy with the results. Just go check it out...


3

I'd have thought that merely plugging the player into the input would do the job. The volume can be attenuated via the gain pot on the amp., and also by the volume control on the player. Turn it down initially, as there will be a propensity for lots of sound. The speaker extension output - it may already be switched, and cuts out the internal speakers of the ...


3

I hope this may sort of answer your question. Faced with the same sort of problem, on bass, a 5 string came to the rescue. It had a low B, thus could play a fourth lower than standard. It covered most of the lower notes that would be needed.A guy I work with sometimes uses an 8 string bass - this goes down to a low F# - nearly an octave lower than standard. ...


2

Computer: If the computer you asked this question on belongs to you, is less than about 2 years old and is not an i3, Pentium or Celeron, it should be fine. Older Athlon X2 or Intel Core 2 Duo/Quad machines are passable, but edging toward obsolete for modern DAWs, especially when you'll be using a lot of VST plugins as with EDM. A Celeron, Pentium or other ...


2

I have to say that I agree with others in that you can get started for very little money. As others have said, REAPER is good (though not free, it is fully functioning and unrestricted for your trial use, then only $60 for a personal use license if you decide to buy). I have also found that there are several good forums for virtual software instruments that ...


2

Yes this is due to low quality stands and often the weight of the keyboard but also the resonance effect. When you hit the keys at the left or right end in a certain rhythm you increase the wobbling. What you can do is attach the mount to a wall with some cheap brackets or just build your own frame from wood which is based on triangles. You won't have any ...



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