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1

The effects loop on a guitar amplifier is between the preamp (where the gain and EQ controls sit to modify the tone) and the power amplifier (which pretty much just makes everything louder). Your specific amplifier has a multi-channel tube preamp with a solid state power amp. As your amplifier has an effects loop, you can feed a non-guitar input in through ...


2

Why not do both? Use a DI unit such as a Radial JDV or similar and run one output into your amp which is mic'd and the other into your audio interface and record the direct dry signal at the same time, then simply add an amp sim plugin and choose a tone to complement your amp tone.


7

The answer is: It depends. A good amp connected to a good cab in a good room will sound good through a well placed good mic connected to a good preamp. I don't believe that any amp sim can beat that yet. But that's a lot of variables, many things can go wrong, it's not very hard but certainly not trivial. To me, a good amp simulator sounds way better than ...


7

When using an amp with microphone, it means that you play the guitar through a physical amp, and using a microphone to direct this sound into your recording system. An amp simulator is software that literally simulates an amp; you plug your guitar into your computer (through an interface for better quality), and this sound is modified by the software that ...


2

Any basic turntable should be perfectly fine to get started. The RPM can be set between 45 and 33.3 on quite basic models. If you have need for 78 RPM, you might need to search for that, but that would only apply to you if you already had some 78s lying around that you wanted to listen to. You won't come across those in everyday listening and purchasing. The ...


2

Any solution you choose is going to cost a significant amount of money, such as in buying a new instrument. There are many models and brands of pitch-shifter effects pedals and rack-mount multi-effects devices that can transpose everything you play down a half-step, whole-step or further, but they all sound artificial, especially if you are playing chords. ...


2

Have a look at this video: Apparently he installed 4 drop-tuners, I had never seen it before but it does provide a cool effect and a quick dropped tuning. It is not as versatile as a ...


2

There doesn't appear to be a bass version, but Hipshot make a "Trilogy" bridge that allows you to pick one of three tunings for each string individually. Alternatively, you could just use a capo - down-tune the guitar a whole step then use the capo to bring it back up.


4

Pitch shift pedals usually do not give a natural detuned sound. There are pedals dedicated for getting a natural detuned sound, like the Digitech Whammy DT or Morpheus DropTune. I haven't used one, so I can't back up their claims.


3

I hope this may sort of answer your question. Faced with the same sort of problem, on bass, a 5 string came to the rescue. It had a low B, thus could play a fourth lower than standard. It covered most of the lower notes that would be needed.A guy I work with sometimes uses an 8 string bass - this goes down to a low F# - nearly an octave lower than standard. ...


5

Tronical. You can buy one directly from the Tronical company to install on your existing guitar, or you can buy certain models of Epiphone and Gibson guitars with a Tronical tuner already installed. Gibson and Epiphone market them under the trade-name "Min-ETune".


1

In this price range, guitars are pretty much the same in term of woods, of course there is two major categories : Startocasters like (S type) ans Gibson type (G type) S types comes with single coils and woods that sound clean G types are equiped with humbuckers and are offently made of mahogany, wich have a better sustain. S types guitars would be squier, ...



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