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If you're comfortable with some light hardware and software hacking, I'd suggest a Sansa Clip MP3 player with RockBox firmware and a mod to the mic input. However, it's mono. For more information, see http://jimlaurwilliams.org/wordpress/?p=1748


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A simple cable "Y" splitter will allow two guitars to work on one amp, if one is using a "clean" sound [no deliberate distortion] and can live with the fact that each guitar's volume control will have some effect on the volume of both guitars (the volume control on each guitar works by both restricting the flow of sound to from the pickups to the cable, and ...


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It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


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A mobile phone with Android operating system can do. You need an adaptor to connect your source to the jack that is normally used for headphones but also supports headphones with microphone. Details are as described here, for instance. Does not look very complex to do. A phone is much easier to carry around than a laptop and some lower end models can be ...


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Minidiscs are still readily available.Last player/recorder I got from a car boot sale for £3. Very portable, 320 mins recording time, brilliant sound quality, editing facilities. Usually a port for line in and another for mic. What's not to like?


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Did you consider any of the IK Multimedia products - http://www.ikmultimedia.com/products/cat-view.php?C=mobile [no affiliation] Might be cheaper than a dictaphone... & you'll always have your phone with you.


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Monitor speakers are speakers that play the plain sound without distortion through the frequency range. They are designed to allow you to hear exactly the electronic sound. "Monitor" is a specialist type of loudspeaker. Most loudspeakers do not provide such a uniform frequency response. Most loudspeakers have all different kinds of frequency response, but ...


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As a volunteer sound guy, I feel like I have to weigh in here. I think Tetsujin and Dave have explained the technical side very well, but there's also a practical side: If you want good sound, you must keep the stage as quiet as possible! Even for rock concerts. Most performers will ask for more of something in their (foldback) monitors because they ...


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As mentioned in other answers there are different uses of the word "monitor". The most common usage in music production is the special speakers the sound engineer / producer uses to listen to the mix. In technical terms what separates these from normal speakers is a flat frequency response. What does that mean? If you look at the fourier transform ...


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There are (at least) two types of speakers referred to as monitors, and (at least) two types of speakers referred to as loudspeakers: studio monitors -- speakers that are specifically designed to have flat response, minimal distortion and so on. Their intended use is in the context of a recording studio to provide unadulterated playback of the recorded ...


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Good, clear answer by @Tetsujin. Just one thing to add: when musicians talk about monitors in a live setting, this can refer informally to foldback monitors, also known as stage monitors. These are rear facing loudspeakers (usually) which allow musicians to hear what they are playing, and a mix of the other musicians playing with them. This allows musicians ...


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It's really just a matter of degree. Monitors are loudspeakers, but you would expect them to be flat, clean & accurate, just the thing to use in your studio - & consequently expensive; whereas generic 'loudspeakers' could be the things in your boom box, or even your alarm clock, right up to your hi-fi. Often they don't look particularly ...



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