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Not quite sure exactly what you are asking (recording, live sound?) but as a guitar player who also is responsible for the PA for my band, and as a songwriter with an in- home recording studio - I have studied on this and experimented over the years. Here are some thoughts to consider. Different speakers are designed differently to do different things. ...


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If we first simplify things to consider that the speakers are in an infinite space with no walls, floors or reflective surfaces, many of the things you mention have to do with, as you say, the amount of time the sound takes to get to the ear from each driver. Let's also pretend for a moment that people have just one ear! If you were to place two speakers ...


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I see in the comments that you are already familiar with the polar patterns. For the readers that don't know them, here they are: Polar pattern: A microphone's directionality or polar pattern indicates how sensitive it is to sounds arriving at different angles about its central axis. Simply put, from which directions the microphone is capturing sound. ...


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The 57/58 is a standard stage mic with good reason - durable, dependable, relatively inexpensive, and cardioid enough for the average volume singer. My primary reason for going with tighter patterns is if the singer sings softly and is fronting a band. Typically what happens with the standard cardioid in this case is that the singer can't hear herself and ...


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It's all explained very clearly here: Heil sound website A hypercardioid is more directional, so although it may allow you to have your monitors a bit MORE too loud :-) you need better mic technique. And the rear lobe means a floor wedge monitor shouldn't be placed directly behind the mic, but over a bit.



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