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5

This gets easier as one's hands grow larger. One way to work on correct, relaxed finger position is to play scales while keeping the fingers curled and relaxed. She should play any kind of exercise she is already playing, or just scales if she has no exercises, while observing the following: The wrists should be above the level of the keyboard, but not so ...


5

If you're hitting wrong notes after resting, you are probably hitting wrong notes when you are practicing tired as well, while being less aware of them. If your fingers get sore and tired after two hours of practice every day for several days, then you are likely trying to force a technical goal to happen with extra effort, rather than becoming aware of the ...


4

I have seen videos by some amazing and well established drum tutors which state that when practicing a move, make sure your hands are as strong as each other, and you don't play all dexterity in your lead hand. Ghost notes are a good example - said videos recommend you can do it both ways around. Another example was a sticking of RRLRRLRRLRRL on hi-hat ...


3

"Can someone tell me how many Hanon excersises I should be doing, and for roughly how long I should be doing the exercises before starting my pieces?" One possible answer to this question is: NONE! It is perfectly possible to make great progress with piano without spending any time at all on Hanon. They are very un-musical, and you might make better ...


3

Some points I want to hit right up front here (and then I'll get very wordy w/ the actual exercises). As you can tell, this is a subject near & dear to my heart. Good blend between voice parts is actually (mostly) about good blend between individuals. Once a person has decided that they'll pay attention to good blend, then they tend to bring that ...


3

Before I talk about cool-down exercises-- I'd be wary in your situation as you describe your feelings as "sore" and "uncomfortable". After a good practice session, you may feel a general sense of tiredness, but you should NEVER have pain or even soreness. Robert Schumann invented a device to "stretch" his fingers and ended up with an irreversible hand injury ...


2

The disconnect between chest and head voice that you experience is completely normal. It is called the passaggio. To minimize the difference in sound between the two vocal registers, you must gradually make them meet in the middle. Chest For your chest voice, try and raise your overall range in half-step increments. Use any of the standard effective ...


2

It may sound glib, but study the playing of guitarists such as Django Reinhart, who managed very well with a couple of fingers - the others were there, but in a similar manner to yours, worked together rather than independently.


2

Tim H's comment is a good place to start, since doing two different things with two hands at the same time is pretty much the same process on every instrument. Some general advice for any instrument: There are no shortcuts. Patient, consistent practice is always the most important part of learning any skill, and certainly musical instruments. The more ...


2

If you're serious about your musical career, it is imperative that you get together with a physical therapist who is WELL VERSED in the issues that musicians (particularly pianists and violinists) face. It is a specialized problem that needs specialized approaches. It's much like the sports-medicine folks... What is likely happening is that you are ...


2

I would like to cite an answer to another question about the Hanon exercises: "Usually with a book of etudes, the thing to do is to work on one for about two weeks, give or take, allowing the tempo to increase by itself, guided by comfort, and then move on to the next etude. After a couple of months of this, you can start cycling back to the first, and ...


2

"I find that doing this takes so, so, so much time and I can barely get onto my pieces during my morning practice." You have the answer there. Exercises should only take up a small part of your practice. In music practice you should be working on Warm up Technique Old material New material Theory etc etc


2

It's impossible to diagnose exactly what she is doing over the internet, but so long as the unused fingers are in a relaxed natural-looking position, there is probably nothing to worry about. Developing independent finger-movement takes time. As she progresses to playing music with more chords than single notes, the other fingers will naturally have to "stay ...


1

One technique of piano playing, designed to facilitate brilliant passage playing, is to lift ALL fingers except the ones currently striking down on a note. An associated exercise is press down (silently) five keys with all five fingers then play repeated notes with each finger in turn. You soon find out if you have real independent control of the fingers! ...


1

I was a rock guitarist playing gigs in the early 70's and I note that I did much of my scale and riff practice on a wide neck nylon string classic guitar. When I picked up my Les Paul on stage I was pretty fast on the light gauge metal after dealing with the nylon strings (the Les Paul has a relatively wide neck more similar to classical guitars than, say, a ...


1

Well, first of all, no this should not be happening. I would ask a few questions: what keyboard are you practicing on? What type of music are you playing? What types of exercises are you doing? And what is your overall experience level? With answers to those questions, we could likely drive toward a better answer. Overall, playing a keyboard does not ...


1

For range, you can do finger stretches away from your guitar. Things like spreading your fingers fingers apart (two at a time) using your other hand to push them apart, pulling individual fingers backwards, and also pulling all fingers backward together (kind of a palm stretch). You can do this frequently at any time without having your guitar present. And ...


1

There are little finger exercising gadgets you can buy. I've never used one, but I knew someone who found it helpful. It looks a bit like a set of trumpet valves, without the trumpet. Maybe a physical therapist could help too. I'm a cellist, not a guitarist, so I can't swear these ideas will carry over for you -- but I'd like to give it a try. First, I ...


1

Doing P-I-M-A-E pickling exercises is a great idea for introducing the right hand pinky. Play scales with your right hand thumb plucking the Low E and A strings your Index plucking the D, middle gets G, Annular gets B and pinky gets high E. It is very counter intuitive at first but after a while you do get the hang of it. This will give a depth of ...


1

If you're going up or down the piano playing octaves you'll need to move your arm, but you should minimize the movement as much as possible. A lot of times beginners will move their arm up much more than they need to in general when moving up or down the piano. Minimizing the movement minimizes the distance you need to move from one octave to another. As ...


1

You need to practice slowly and with concentration. It is not about training your muscles it is about training your brain. You are learning how to move your hand in ways that you've (probably) never done before. You need to go through the motions carefuly and slowly, consciously monitoring how you are moving your fingers, scanning for tension or strain in ...


1

Practice longtones with crescendos and decrescendos, practice all your scales, and practice scales with different tongueing patterns like tongue slur, tongue two slur two, etc.


1

I have thought about this too, from the point of view of an old guitarist who is currently trying to master the piano. My main conclusion is that I am really not convinced that "finger strength" is the crucial thing; what you really need for almost any musical instrument is flexibility and finger independence. For instance, when you say " My ring finger ...


1

I've had luck with the Grip Master (and other derivatives) series of hand exercisers. I can easily and quietly use it at my desk at work while mindlessly working on something else. There's a PDF that Prohands (the originators of these products) that has many exercises available for musicians with demonstrations; but I've found, specifically with guitar the ...



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