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8

There are a couple of differences between a metronome and a drum machine. A metronome just keeps a regular beat. Some electronic metronomes give a slightly different click to indicate the start of a bar, but that's all. Drum patterns have lots more elements that help keep you in time -- for a typical rock pattern, emphasis on the first beat, snares on the ...


7

One "offline" (without guitar) exercise I got from my teacher is like this: Put your hand on the table. Lift fingers two or three at a time; if you are like me, combinations 1+3, 2+4, 1+2+4 and 1+3+4 will feel weird; you should try to make them comfortable. This is for both hands (you only need your left hand improved, but it cannot hurt if you train ...


5

As with any dexterity exercise, slow it down! Your hands are likely hurting because you're trying to push them too hard to either: stretch while playing (you should always be doing this before playing) keep up with the exercise speed emulate the sound exactly (for a beginner, this is exceeding difficult) or fret too heavily as with the answer above me, ...


5

Golden rule: When you hurt, stop! You don't want to damage your hand. It might make you stop playing music for ever! The spider as you said is for building dexterity. Hence, at first it will hurt if you are a beginner. But think of it as this: When you start running to build dexterity (and you are out of shape), you won't be able to run for a long time at ...


5

A drum machine, like a real drummer, will often play 8 or sometimes 16 in a bar. Metronomes will be set to play each beat. This sub-division into smaller bits always helps you to keep better time. With a metronome, set it, if possible, to twice the tempo, or even four times. Each time I listen to music in the car, I tap in time to a song, and when I go ...


4

There is some certain uncertainty that makes it difficult to answer this question. The easiest solution would be to record yourself while speeding on a practice pad. I had a similar problem when I was a beginner and the problem was that I tend to make a rotation and some forward translation while I was hitting the drums. The net effect of course is that ...


4

As someone that was in an almost identical position a couple years ago, I'll tell you what worked for me. 1. Self-learning or Teacher? Teacher. In my case, I had plenty of experience with other instruments before I decided to pick up drums. Even so, they were all melodic, music-reading type experiences. Drumming is obviously very rhythm-based. My teacher, ...


4

This kind of coordination seems impossible at first but then one day it seems like it happens magically. Here are some methods that I have seen help countless students. Please note: my answer draws more on guitar and piano experience than percussion experience. I hope percussionists can propose an edit or provide an answer of their own if they have more to ...


3

The "cool air" vs. "warm air" question is a valid one, but doesn't have anything to do with your diaphragm. Diaphragmatic breathing is all about supporting your breath and airstream properly. The issue here is that when your lungs expand, they need room to do so, and expanding down into negative space created by your diaphragm will allow the diaphragm to do ...


3

My answer is coming from a pianist, not a guitarist. Take my advice with a grain of salt, as our needs regarding our hand strength and flexibility are vastly different. My recollection of hand physiology is kind of hazy, but there are tendons linking your fingers together; this is why it's necessary to practice independent finger motion. For piano, a number ...


3

I agree with jjmusicnotes. He has very good points to offer. If you are willing to spend some money on practicing your craft I recommend Brett Manning's Singing Success click here for the website. His work is truly amazing and he has help me increase my range by a full octave. It has also helped my style tremendously. If you can not afford his program ...


3

The best advice I can think to offer is for you to find a vocal instructor in your area and begin studying with them. Based off the information in your question, it seems as though you are trying to sing material inappropriate for your voice type. Working with a trained vocalist will not only give you the pedagogical tools you need to develop and refine ...


2

Just to clear up on the confusion wrought by the other answers, for the future readers of this question: exercises for finger independence DO exist, and some experienced guitarists actually can move their ring finger much more freely than we mortals. In fact, I came upon this question while googling for 'ring finger exercises'. I'm sure that the original ...


2

It sounds like my fingers are a similar length to yours. I found that the important part of reaching the octaves confidently was flexibility rather than length. Your thumb and pinky finger (or even your ring finger) can bend back further than you might think. Never force it though. As with most aspects of playing, I'm afraid it just takes time and practice ...


2

I also have this problem. I am more or less a bass, and my range cuts off in chest voice at around a G or G#, but when I try to sing in that same range with falsetto, the tone is very weak and sometimes I drop notes or crack them when I make the switch between voices. The answer to this problem is very simple: Practice. To achieve the fluent motion between ...


2

Shaking your hand out is good for when it gets tired. Maybe a stress ball or, if you can handle it, a pair of these:


2

Hammering-on incorporates quickly stabbing a finger onto the fretboard. Hold it down once a note sounds.Do it not too gently - it is called hammer.When you're happy making one note with this technique, try two and three fingers, in the shape of the chord you're weak on. It will help all the fingers for that chord arrive on the fretboard together, which is ...


2

It depends on the time you practice and the time you need for the songs you play. Hard to say without knowing you. General rule of thumb: if you don't see progress in the songs you play or don't remember well enough what you practiced the day before, you need to spend more time for the songs you play, so probably you need to preactice less songs. if you ...


1

Some songs are very easy to learn and remember, other songs take longer. I usually learn a song's intro for example, just the intro, until I have the intro in fluent memory. If the intro is simple, that doesn't take long, it can be memorised in minutes, but if it's not, it can sometimes take days to master. Then I go back to adding the next phase of the ...


1

From another answer at this SE I got notion of the book The Musicians Way by Gerald Klickstein. While its main audience are university level musicians, there's a lot of stuff that is useful for those of us not playing for a living. He talks about how to practice, methods for remembering songs, how to approach new material etc. I think there will always be a ...


1

You can't control you're diaphragm; it moves involuntarily. Your teacher has given you incorrect information, which I will outline and correct below. Also, air cannot "come from the diaphragm". That is physiologically impossible. Your air comes from your lungs; nowhere else. Your diaphragm is a muscular membrane that sits below your lungs and above your ...


1

Just maintain a proper technique while you're learning, even through the frustrating stuff. Maybe you've seen your favorite drummer go ham and at times you just wanna bust out and do that *. Take your time with the form being taught to you and then, sooner than later, you'll be busting out sick fills in no time.


1

I had a similar problem and I tried to solve it by just playing some basic chord progressions and paying attention to switching between chords. It helped for particular chord progressions, but it didn't improve my finger coordination in general. By doing that I simply developed muscle memory for particular movements that didn't work for new chords and new ...


1

I'm not really a fan of "lifting" fingers independently. Its not really a natural motion nor is it really useful when playing guitar. You're better off doing chromatic 4 note per string scales on the guitar, playing in position and moving vertically up/down strings. Doing this slowly and accurately to a metronome, and slowly increasing in tempo. Steve Vai ...


1

Starting with the low E string play first fret first finger, then second fret second finger, third fret third finger, fourth fret fourth finger then proceed to the next string. You will be ascending in notes. Then try descending starting with the pinky. You may try combinations like first, third, second, fourth finger in that order on the string. Steve Vai ...


1

Drum sticks are basically 'sticks'!!!! Instructing new students in the Art of Stick Fighting, I find that new students most often act as though a 'stick' is a 'club' - They hang on to it like there is no tomorrow and bang it against your stick as hard as they can. After you explain to them that your stick is there to help them, and that there really is no ...


1

A John petrucci training exercise I used a while back helps a lot with finger dexterity You start off with a basic chord of : 1 2 3 4 X X Then move your index up a fret and switch positions with the middle finger like so: 2 1 3 4 X X Then you move up the whole 4 strings you are fretting with the index When you're done you should have: 4 1 2 3 X X Then you ...


1

If you play E minor pentatonic as 9/4, 12/4, 10/5, 12/5, 10/6, 12/6 (first number is the fret. Second number is the string.), everything on the 12th fret is done with the pinky, and that's half of the scale, so that would help with training your pinky.


1

although @luser covered pretty nice most of the techniques you could use to train your pinky, but i found that this wasn't enough. sometimes after you stretch and reach out for a far fret using your pinky, what's happening is that you are stretching the muscles and tendons of your pinky so the moment you want to use it again in a semi-relaxed position you'll ...


1

I've tested many different things in years, from online flashcards to books to some sort of software and so one. By far one of the best options is Notable by The Noteable Software Company. It analyses your reaction time and gives you the charts and statistics of your real ability of recognizing the notes, as well as a road map to the progress. It has some ...



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