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I can confirm the stretching aspect. The distance between tip of pinky and tip of thumb on my left hand is noticeably longer than on my right hand. This is due to 8-10 years of typical left hand positions of playing large intervals. Now I find myself attempting to play a major 10th that involves white and black keys (example: E major, 5 on E, 2 on B, 1 on ...


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There's a musician I know who through some congenital problem, illness or accident has fingers that barely extend to the first knuckle. Maybe he shouldn't aim to be a concert pianist. But in his chosen field of theatre music, his piano playing is amazingly adequate!


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Usually with a book of etudes, the thing to do is to work on one for about two weeks, give or take, allowing the tempo to increase by itself, guided by comfort, and then move on to the next etude. After a couple of months of this, you can start cycling back to the first, and continuing to review. This means that if you spend 8 minutes working on the etude ...


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The book doesn't specify what path to take for a good reason and that is the final goal is to master them a faster speed and exact path you take isn't as important as where you end up. A simple example is you may find that exercise 2 is easier for you then exercise 1 so you may be able to master exercise 2 at a bpm of 108 before you are able to master ...


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When doing any technical exercise, like Hanon, practice moving as quickly as you can with good technique. Think of scales - when you were learning them, you did them until you "learned" them, and then added more. As you progressed, you learn to get the tempo higher more quickly than on the previous one, and the ones you already learned continued to get ...


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I am not certain if I have perfect pitch. In fact, I probably do not as if one would ask me to sing, for example, c, or f# I cannot. I do have relative pitch, and have always been rather successful at this. Where I am confused in this topic, are instances where I will hear a note, and will be usually able to identify it correctly, after checking on an ...


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No. True perfect or absolute pitch is an inborn and automatic trait that cannot be trained or learned. People with true absolute pitch hear different musical tones as clearly and effortlessly as normally-sighted people see different colors. It tends to be approximately as rare as true tone deafness (that is, it's a lot less common than many people think), ...


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Try Auralia software and similar ones. And write your own music in various keys and you will develop it if do whish. All who have perfect pitch they had worked hard with sounds from infant age. No miracle exists. PP is not everything you need to be a top player. It is an ability to take a snapshot of sound in your impressive memory. When you are playing a ...



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