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I'm a keyboard player not a guitarist, but the same issue of finger independence is relevant. I'm not sure your statement is an accurate description of cause, at least for a normal hand anatomy. AFAIK the limitation is the arrangement of the tendons in the hand, not the nerves. For what it's worth, if my hand is in a relaxed position with all the finger ...


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It may sound glib, but study the playing of guitarists such as Django Reinhart, who managed very well with a couple of fingers - the others were there, but in a similar manner to yours, worked together rather than independently.


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Look up some George Lynch exercises and just noodle around with them, getting them into your regular practice regimen. That guy is murder on the pinky. (http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7yIjX-Pq5Sc)


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There are little finger exercising gadgets you can buy. I've never used one, but I knew someone who found it helpful. It looks a bit like a set of trumpet valves, without the trumpet. Maybe a physical therapist could help too. I'm a cellist, not a guitarist, so I can't swear these ideas will carry over for you -- but I'd like to give it a try. First, I ...


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Doing P-I-M-A-E pickling exercises is a great idea for introducing the right hand pinky. Play scales with your right hand thumb plucking the Low E and A strings your Index plucking the D, middle gets G, Annular gets B and pinky gets high E. It is very counter intuitive at first but after a while you do get the hang of it. This will give a depth of ...


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I'm going to disagree with some of the advice in other answers. There is a very basic mistake which is easy for beginners to fall into without really thinking about it, and that is to assume that "you play the piano with your fingers". To get beyond simple playing technique, you have to realize that you really play with piano with your arms, and even with ...


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The key (as is almost always the case when you feel aches and pains from piano) is relaxation. Each of your fingers only needs to be "active" (i.e. not relaxed) at the instant it actually strike a key, because you can move from key to key and hold keys down while relaxing that finger. In fact, if you are not relaxed, you are inhibiting your movement ...


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Positioning The correct way to play octaves is to keep the wrist completely still and relaxed while your fingers do all the "leg work." Moving your wrist up and down will cause your fingers to have uneven lengths when reaching the keyboard. Keeping your wrist still and slightly below the keyboard will even out the length of your fingers so that they have ...


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If you're going up or down the piano playing octaves you'll need to move your arm, but you should minimize the movement as much as possible. A lot of times beginners will move their arm up much more than they need to in general when moving up or down the piano. Minimizing the movement minimizes the distance you need to move from one octave to another. As ...



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