Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Memorizing your scales accomplishes at least these four things: Trains your fingers to play common patterns found in music. There are a lot of scales in music. They're just so satisfying, why not write them? They can be a controlled environment for practicing other techniques, such as playing fast, playing in octaves, and playing fast in octaves. It trains ...


17

If you would like to see a tour de force in the use of repeated notes, have a look at Martha Argerich's performance of Scarlatti's D Minor Sonata: You will notice that she uses 321321 ...


12

Your fallacy here is in thinking that "people with much less talent than myself are considered stronger musicians just because they know the "right" fingerings?" Listen more closely to what you have actually been told: "they say that the fingerings are an absolute must." Unless you've left something out, they never actually said you are a worse musician for ...


11

Using the 4-th alternatively with the 5-th on black keys is mainly done for the following reason: legato, especially on semitone steps of the scale. On the right hand, you have better control of the transition to and volume of the higher note of the octave which is the more important for the tone and the listener. You can do smoother scales that way. By ...


11

First question : there is no rule, no "max limit" between notes. Sometime you'll have to figure out yourself the way you spread the notes between your two hands (try the Bach chorales... you're a conductor with four voices, the relative heights of the notes are written relative to the singer's tessitura, not the keybord player's hands). You'll also face ...


11

There is indeed a reason! The notes you play on a trumpet with a particular fingering come from the harmonic series, which is a series of tones based on the root, or fundamental frequency. The idea is that the harmonics (also called overtones) are whole-number multiples of the fundamental frequency. If the fundamental frequency of, say, your trumpet, is ...


10

You should do whatever it takes to improve your practice and thus performance of the piece. In almost all cases, this means gratuitous writing and penciling of all accidentals and missed notes and fingerings. If it will ever help you, write it down. Your goal is not having something be easy to read or being clean: your goal is to play it perfectly. If that ...


9

Short answer: the fingering can be the problem, but there are other possibilities, one of which is finger placement. Congratulation for your study of the soprano recorder. Hope you are having fun. -> The fingering you show in your question is a typical fingering for a baroque soprano recorder. I presume you have a baroque/english-model recorder because ...


9

There's nothing wrong with starting on the third finger. I would think most people would be taught it that way, because then it's consistent with the fingering you would use as you go up an octave (i.e., if you start on A♭4 you should play A♭5 with the third finger). Some pianists might start with the second finger on the right hand, however. The ...


9

The important thing is consistency. If you are playing the same style and volume, you should hit the keys the same way. When you move a finger from one key to another, you have to lift it a little. So when you play the same key twice, you should lift it a similar amount. If you want to play loud, accented notes, it may help to lift your fingers a little ...


9

I think the key is muscle memory. The only way to improve this is by specific repetitive movements. In your question you state: "quick interchanging between my 2 and 3rd finger." Presumably there is a song you are working on that requires this, so the part you are having trouble with, do that move over and over again until you no longer have a problem doing ...


9

I am not an expert in human physiology, but I believe the constraint you describe is completely normal. I think it has something to do with a shared tendon? Needless to say, my hands behave the same way. You should be able to lift the fourth finger higher if you raise the pinky at the same time, yes? What I do know about human physiology is that each joint ...


9

Getting an even touch with alternating fingers might feel hard at first. However, try knocking the table with one finger and alternating two or more. You find you can tap a lot faster in the latter case. This speed reserve gives you more overhead and more control. On the other hand when you're playing two different notes you're mostly using different ...


8

Major 7th Voicings These are some GM7 chords; move them around as needed. Edit: Just in case it wasn't already clear, by "move them around as needed", I mean if you ever find yourself in a situation where you want to play a chord with a different root than G (I know, seems unlikely, but you never know), just move the chord shapes up and down the neck until ...


8

Altissimo is just a name for notes above what is (or used to be, at least) considered higher than the "normal" range of the instrument. Most saxophones can play up to written F or F-sharp above the treble staff normally just by using side keys that open tone holes farther up the saxophone to make the air column shorter along with the octave vent opening. ...


8

Naturally, someone with small fingers won't be able to make the larger reaches in some pieces. Some stretches aren't reachable even by people with average size hands. Not every piece is for everyone. In particular there are some Bach, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff pieces requiring stretches of an octave or more (though I couldn't tell you which ones ...


8

They are assuming you are using finger 4 on the top D#. The reason to switch from 2-1 is that if you ended up with 3rd finger on the G# and 4th finger on D# above, it is too far of a stretch. If you are playing the high D# with 5th finger it won't feel so uncomfortable, but then you can't connect the melody notes with finger legato. The finger switch ...


8

Piano fingerings are all about context. The notes which come before and after dictate the best fingering now. in the case that you're playing the 1st 4 notes of C major it depends what the 5th note is. if the note is the root C again, then the thumb is probably the worst finger you can use for playing F, if on the other hand you're continuing up the ...


7

The barre chords are a hurdle for the beginner, and only become easier with practice. The strat should not be an issue; I play barre chords on an acoustic strung with .013 - .056 and fairly high action - much more resistance than you're likely to have. (I've also been doing it for 40 years...as I say, practice). Some people wrap their thumb around the neck ...


7

Wherever possible you should be trying to use a finger per fret, in the case of the B chord in your picture your fingering is wrong. Your index finger should be barring from the A string on the second fret (B note), with your ring finger covering the D,G,B strings on the 4th fret. The you should strum the chord from the A string, if you are having trouble ...


7

There are six canonical two-octave major scale fingerings for guitar, three with the root on the E-string and three with the root on the A-string, and they come in pairs---meaning, each root-on-E-string scale is paired with an root-on-A-string scale. You'll see what I mean in a moment. Here are the root-on-E-string scales, in the key of A: Pattern 1 ...


7

EXCELLENT question! The answer actually rather like "Why does stopped french horn sound up a half step when closing the bell lowers my tuning?" Horn players routinely adjust their hand position to close or open the bell of the instrument, thereby changing the tuning. When they need to adjust themselves down, they close the bell, and when they need to ...


6

It sounds to me like you're playing the white keys too far in. If you back up a little, your third finger will be reaching forward ahead of your index finger and there should be no rubbing. Since the black keys are raised, this should actually help you play more smoothly as well. If you play in too far, the distance your fingers have to reach for the ...


6

These arpeggios are very irregular, which does not help your case. If you're not convinced that your ideas for fingering are the best for you, I'd suggest getting a few different editions of the music and seeing what the editors suggest. IMSLP has 2 editions freely available online here; the score submitted by Feldmahler has suggested fingerings. These ...


6

With experience and practice, you won't think about the order in which you place fingers for a chord like this. You'd place all your fingers at the same time. In the meantime, I would tend towards 1-2-3-4 -- your stronger first two fingers can anchor the hand before you place the other two.


6

Thumb on C, second finger on Db, fifth finger on C. You need a wide hand for that, and the ability to stretch almost an octave from the 2nd to 5th finger. Playing both notes with the thumb seems awkward because of the way the thumb has to bend for it. If you can't reach all 3 notes, try it leaving out one of the notes and see which two notes sound best. ...


6

It is certainly acceptable to play notes in various ways - whether or not the conductor wants you to do that is up to him, but you should certainly be able to get higher volume by using two strings. Not sure what you mean by 'sacrifice assurance' - if you are worried about your position, you should just look at where you are moving to after this not. If it ...


6

There's no such thing as finger independence(read finger equality most of the time). All our fingers are different, and they're all connected too! For instance, would you ever expect any of your fingers to match your thumb in strength? Or take your index finger and press it to your palm. Your other fingers will move as well. The key to evenness and ...


6

There are no hard and fast rules for this. See, everybody's got different sized fingers. There are plenty of ways to play the same thing. All you've got are just some general rules. For the "piano lesson" book songs and SOME sheet music, there are little numbers next to the notes from 1 to 5. They tell you which fingers to use on the note. thumb index ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible