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2

As a cellist, I think it is safe for me to say that this is acceptable. I've played pieces in which this is actually necessary. Whether or not your conductor wants you to do that is another issue, but I'd recommend either asking him (if you are the principle cellists) or asking the principle cellist. That would be the type of decision they would make. But ...


9

I do see why you prefer the imiimi fingering, you are following a pattern where your fingers are used to three notes on each string, and that feels good. There are some rare but serious classical guitarists that use a three finger technique (imaima) that get a similar feeling without the problems that I discuss below and @Matt also stated. It can be an even ...


4

In this case I see no reason to deviate from alternating between m and i. Your way of playing this phrase limits fluency and speed. Imagine playing the same phrase much faster. Will you still be able to pluck two consecutive notes with your index finger? There are indeed cases where it is easier or more natural (for most players) to use i or m for two ...


2

Your fingering is not necessarily more or less "correct", but you will get a slightly different sound. The suggested fingering will have a more even delineation of the notes, while your fingering will add a little variation in the shaping of the phrase. So,it's a matter of musical interpretation. If you are changing the fingering because you prefer the ...


1

With less than an octave span, you are going to have problems for quite a bit of literature. There are a few keyboard types friendlier to smaller hand spans, but you won't find most of them, with the exception of Jankó keyboards, on a piano or grand piano. But that's not really an option when you don't play in a "bring your own piano" setting. Note that ...


4

Each player's physiology is different - length of fingers/thumb, flexibility, etc. There may, or may not, be a 'standard' way to position, but basically, it's going to be down to individuality, and each player will find his own best method, which will change as the chord shapes change, or when playing only one or two strings. Or when seated or standing.Or ...


1

Here is the answer I got from Peter Forrest: People tend to play often with the thumb protruding when playing open chords like F, C, G when playing near the nut. I do it myself. It all depends on the next chord that you will be playing and will moving that thumb make more effort for one's changes. When playing up the fretboard, the thumb ...


2

My grandfather was a pianist with extremely large hands (I don't know what he could reach), but he always said the pianist with small hands were lucky. He felt his large hands were a disadvantage and he had to work a lot harder to get them to do what was needed. Reaching chords is just one small aspect of what is needed to play well.


4

In most case, when choosing which string to use for each note one choice will be easier than the others. So, when first learning a piece I'll usually play that one. It has to do with how the chord-tones map to chord-shapes. After more familiarity with the piece, the difference in ease between the possibilities may lessen (because you've still been ...


2

Sight reading scores for instruments with controls that are not diatonically organized like the score is, is cumbersome. That is one reason that certain wind instruments are "transposing", writting in a different pitch than played. The problem is exacerbated for polyphonic instruments. That is the reason that there are instrument specific notations like ...


1

Sight reading on guitar is harder than on other instruments, due to this. There is sheet music where the fingering is printed. One approach would be to find some and try to learn from that. There is a lot of tablature out there, it should exist for classical pieces too. Then you will have the fingering explicitly available. Otherwise, the position is ...


6

To some degree it is up to you as an artist to make those choices, but often there is a recommended fingering for difficult sections that the publisher includes in the notation of published classical guitar music. The numbers 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 tell you which finger you should use for a note that they are near to (usually before, sometimes below or above). ...


0

Some things to watch out for that may help to prevent this is to use proper fingering numbers that are comfortable to play the piece. Also, watch out for tempo. When you're a beginner you might want to play a little faster like more experienced players but just keep it simple. And it might also help to practice some technique exercises to gain more ...



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