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3

Assuming you're playing this with a pick, you have some options. Bar both notes with the index finger: |------------ |------------ |------------ |-------5-7-- |-5-8-5------ |------------ v ^ v v ^ --- \ same direction ("sweep/economy pick") If you're playing this on an electric guitar with distortion, you have to roll the fingertip, ...


3

You should roll your first finger, i.e. first you press down the A string on the 5th fret with the tip of your index finger, and when you need to play the 5th fret of the d string, you make your first finger flat, but instead of barring both strings you roll your first finger in such a way that you press down the d string with the softer part of your first ...


0

I've learned from the beginner tutorials that the first 4 frets are allocated to point, middle, ring and little fingers respectively. Then you've been watching/reading some extremely sucky beginner tutorials. This isn't even the standard way of playing scales, according to the guitar grade syllabuses (syllabi?) for UK examination boards. It's quite ...


3

In general, a 'sense of the future' is useful. Fingering for each note be done so that the fingers (resources) are available so that our ability to play future notes with ease is at the best. How I would think of it: if one had to play just three notes (finger names within parentheses): 2nd string 1st fret (index), 2nd fret (middle) and the 4th fret ...


12

You should use whatever is more effective, comfortable, economical, etc. Some traditional methods of guitar will insist on using certain fingers for certain strings or related ideas like hitting repeated notes on one string by rotating through index-middle-ring, etc. There is often a good reason for this, but none of these work in all situations — ...


0

It also may depend on how fast or slow the notes are as was mentioned. Is there a pedal involved? I would try to keep my hand as close to perpendicular to the keyboard as possible. I tend to think that your first choice is the closest except for the 2nd to the last B where I would use my 2nd finger. Thats for the first example. In the 2nd I would use what ...


1

A lot of it depends on tempo, as well as the size of your hand. In general, it's better to avoid passing the thumb under or finger over in widely-spaced figures such as this one, unless the tempo is very slow and you want a very legato sound and can't get it any other way because your hand is too small. Also, thumb on black keys is much less of a ...


0

Playing D with the correct fingering should be easy enough. If you think this is awkward or slow you should try the clarinet, or for some real fun, the bassoon. :) Trying to get it some other way is going to not be worth the effort and not sound right and probably be out of tune. Using the alternate fingering for E (with the jump key) should be used ...


0

It depends on what else is going on. If nothing, then I use 1,3,4. But sometimes you're playing variations so you'll bar and use your free fingers to find the variations. In short, if you're accurate with the pick and mute the strings not being played, then it doesn't matter... heck, some guys bar just because it leaves the middle finger free and they ...


3

For rock blues and metal styles (thumb up top) the only time you should barre is with power chords with the root on the G string (144). All other 3 note power chords are 134 with the exception of the sixth string root which may be T34.or 134. Which is a matter of preference. The important part is muting the unplayed strings. The index finger must mute any ...


4

While either are correct, there are subtle differences for each fingering that can be taken advantage of especially when going from power chord to barre chord. You can and should take advantage of the different types of fingerings. The 1,3,4 fingering for power chords let's you take advantage of the E major, E minor, A minor, D major, and D minor shaped ...


3

The main point of alternating fingers in octave passages is not to enable legato playing. It won't produce a good legato anyway, since the thumb always has to jump/slide (although for psycho-acoustic reaons, half a legato can produce a nice illusion of the real thing). The real reason has to do with finger and hand positions. Judicious choice of the finger ...


4

If you can play this study beautifully, using your own fingering, any fingering, that should be good enough. But where it fits the hand, why not use 4? I'm looking at the Cortot edition (highly recommended; his fingering in particular is generally very very good), and in the very first bar the first pair of octaves is marked 5-5, the second 5-4. All of these ...



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