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Generally, the best fingering to use for pentatonic scales are groupings of twos and threes. A grouping of two would involve the thumb and either the index or even middle finger. A grouping of three would involved the thumb, index and middle OR thumb, middle and ring finger. Speaking generally again, a good rule of thumb (pun intended) is to experiment ...


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You could get Barbara Barber's Scales for Advanced Violinists. That's pretty cheap, and has scale and arpeggio patterns for all 12 keys in 3 octaves. I would learn the G, A and Bb scales in one octave, starting with the open G string, the high 1 finger on the G string, which is A, and the low two finger on the G string, which is Bb. In G and A, listen for ...


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@Drona - well done ! There's not a lot wrong here. Your posture is going to make the playing easier if you sit up more, and make the body of your guitar more vertical. Now, it's angled and makes your left hand need to curl round too much, making your fingers press on the fingerboard too straight. Pull the bottom of the guitar in, and your hand will fit ...


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Look here http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/1999/oct/21/on-playing-the-piano/ for an article by Charles Rosen on this subject. Unfortunately you can only read the first three paragraphs for free, but you find out a lot in those three paragraphs. You learn for instance that Dinu Lipatti once remarked, "You know, it has been at least ten years since I ...


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For major arpeggios (typically rooted on the 6th or 5th string), begin with either middle (2) or your little (4) finger. So, beginning with the major triad, you either have a comfortable 2-1-4 fingering on two adjacent bass strings or a 4-3-1 fingering on three adjacent bass strings. The upper voices are an exercise for you, but those starting positions ...


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You might want to try Mauro Giuliani 120 right hand studies. http://www.stormthecastle.com/classical_guitar/Collection/120studies-for-right-hand.pdf


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Finger Style I would suggest you practice right-hand patterns. Your note that the exercises you found are "useless" suggests to me that the area you truly want to improve is your right-hand finger picking technique. There are 3 fundamental patterns you should master with the right hand to begin with: 1) Ascending arpeggio: Thumb, Index, Middle, Ring. ...


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I think that eventually most players will adopt their own version, with some of each. Right hand moving from left to right will need the thumb to traverse the keys in some way, obviously. Thinking about it, the hand will move to the right also,to be ready positioned for the subsequent notes further to the right. Therefore there will inevitably be some ...


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From the pictures, it looks like your hand is going too deep. You'll get the most leverage if you strike near the end of the keys. As for using the thumb on black keys, you're right that 1 and 5, being shorter fingers, are less suited for black keys, but sometimes the fingering pattern is such that you should use them on black keys anyway. I'd probably use ...



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