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Some of the tricks used in country music where the guitar was for show more than anything else, the would wrap their thumb around the three base strings and the index fingers around the 123 in same fret to form a chord. Then moving it up and down the neck the singer could play along with the band. Some of those country singers playing was worse than their ...


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Who has the power to decide? Any technique that works for an individual cannot be a bad one. Yes, purists may disagree, but it's not them playing, it's you! As stated already, an extra digit is always an asset, particularly on extended guitar chords. I'm only jealous, having small hands...


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Not at all, it's a great technique! There are chords that you can only play by using your thumb, e.g. the following voicing of A13(b9) (from low E to high e): 5 X 5 6 7 6 where you play the E string with your thumb. If you used your first finger to play a barre chord it would be very difficult to mute the A string.


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I wouldn't say this is a bad technique. There are many guitarists that use this one, for the very same reason you mentioned. You have one extra finger, thus you can play one more note. Also, when I play a chord like this, it is more relaxing for my hand.


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I am a full-time music instructor. I have taught piano for over ten years. This type of situation is very common, and there are 4 camps to be in: TL;DR; Do what feels best to you, for your physical comfort and/or personal musicality. If you can, play literally what is on the page, and ignore the discomfort. Your hand will get stronger over time, as long ...


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I'll comment a bit further on the purpose for holding the note down. It's more common to see it in the bass (it's called a "pedal point") because holding certain bass strings open while playing higher notes creates a richness of tone. Debussy liked to do it often. Have a look at "Isle Joyeuse", between 3:00 and 4:20, where he uses it extensively: ...


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The G is a resonant note, starts with an accent, and the rhythm might end up faster in the end than you start practising it, so holding that note might indeed make acoustic sense as well as musical. The right hand range is merely an octave and the intended fingering is clearly intended to put the whole treble staff material into the right hand, and not ...


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The tempo is fast enough that the note shouldn't fully decay within the four bars, so yes, you should continue to hold it. These notes are not very far apart, and it shouldn't be uncomfortable to play this passage as written. Let your fingers go up the keys as far as needed--the thumb is going to have to reach a bit but unless you have very small hands ...



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