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1

It MAY be not your fault. The action on your guitar may be way too high. That's the height of the strings above the fingerboard.It could also be the strings are quite thick (heavy) and hard to press down.As a beginner, you may not know about these problems and their solutions.I suggest you try on other guitars, and also let an experienced player try your ...


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Firstly, keep practicing. Secondly it's about the way you grasp the neck. I've taught guitar for a while and to be honest I've noticed if the grip on the neck isn't right the chord won't come out at all and you'll get many dead notes. Make sure your wrist is relaxed. Make sure your thumb is behind the back of your hand like a bridge (but don't press too ...


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It also teaches the muscles. Muscle memory is an integral part of learning to play an instrument. The novel thing about your muscles is that you can teach them and they can learn but they have no intelligence and will learn bad things if taught badly. You have to approach teaching them like you would teaching a child that is both deaf and blind. So the ...


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Forget the first note for a moment. The D,F,Ab and Bb fall nicely under thumb, index, middle and ring fingers.You then have to move the right hand along, left to right, parallel to the way the music sheet is on the piano.At the same time, the thumb will be moving under the hand, in order to play the next D, and so on.Now, the first Bb. It really doesn't ...


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This is one of the more difficult arpeggios for most people, because of getting the thumb under the fourth finger for a major third. Try playing F and D together with 2-1. Note your hand position. Now, while holding down D with the thumb, play Bb with 4. You should notice that your wrist has to move pretty far laterally. Now, see how far you can ...


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Technically, there is no 'correct' fingering for any arpeggio - there is fingering which is generally accepted as the easiest or most comfortable way to play an arpeggio. However, I would advise against starting on 4, and would suggest starting on 2 as you would in, say, an Eb major scale. Then, I recommend going to 1, which would allow you to: B♭ - D - F ...


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I think the main advantage comes that when you have fingerings cold for whole scales, you are quite less likely to "paint yourself into a corner" with the fingerings when sightreading. For example, if you play an upward scale part with the right hand and utilize the pinky, then you tend to have a problem if the melody goes on. Practising scales will train ...


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To answer your question: evenly. :) That's why we use the fingerings that we do, because they are generally considered "best practice" to get the scales even. Now, I always start the Ab scales with the second finger in the right hand. There's no technical reason to pass the thumb under the fourth finger instead of the third, and for me passing under ...



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