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2

The fingering you're using looks fine to me, although coming down you may want to adjust the first figure and personally I would use (1,3,1) instead for the begining to keep it closer to the chromatic scale fingering. Coming down 1,2,1,2,3,5 may not work well. In my head it seems like it would be easier fingering it a different way and it's not unheard of ...


4

it seems that playing deeply between the black keys is the right thing to do, because it makes it easier to press the black key as needed. That is correct, for passages with a fair number of black keys in use. But your hand needs to be free to move in and out of the black-key zone. In all-white or almost-all-white-key passages, the default position is ...


3

Instead of learning the "best" or "correct" fingering for every different scale, I think it's better to learn some general principles, and then work out the details for yourself. The repeated pattern of fingers is 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 - but not necessarily starting on 1, because .... Don't use your thumb on the black keys. With the right hand, use your thumb on ...


2

If you compare the standard modern piano keyboard with other older keyboard instruments like the pipe organ or harpsichord, you will notice there is a much deeper region of white keys on the piano in front of the black, and also that the black keys are longer. The basic reason for that is the difference in playing technique caused by the greater force needed ...


8

Playing deeply between the black keys can be problematic. Suppose you want to play a C major scale; only white keys. Now you don't need to play any black keys, but you need to move your fingers over them. If you want to play this at larger speeds, this becomes a major obstacle. Another example is playing a large chord, say, B flat - E - G - C (C dominant ...


3

To a great extent it is going to depend on the physiology of ones hands and fingers. Some players tend to use very curved fingers, others fairly straight. You may have noticed this on videos. There can be no right or wrong with this, or maybe even any common ground. In 50-odd years of playing (some very odd...) it's a question I've never asked myself. ...


0

There's very little software that does anything like this, and nothing that provides an acceptable level of sophistication. As Josiah points out, the difference between playable and impossible can be incredibly subtle. What you need to do is work with experienced musicians, who can give you detailed feedback about things.


5

I'm not aware of anything that analyzes technical difficulty of a passage, but I know that the latest versions of Finale let you flag notes out of the range of various skill levels. Don't look for "possible/impossible", target the level you want and see if the music is feasible. Rather than saying "this is unplayable", you want to look at the way music is ...


3

Not really. You can always mess around and see if you find anything, but you're not going to find anything simpler than the main fingering. Pennywhistle involves a ton of half-holing, you'd better just get used to it.


0

This is an exquisitely beautiful piece; Satie probably wins the prize for millihelens per note. Anyway, I don't have a grand and can't practice the middle pedal, but it only sustains the single bass note, whereas if you hold down the right pedal through each bar, all of the harmonics of that bass note will sound sympathetically through the whole piano, ...


1

You just play all the notes at the right time and do what pianists call "legato pedalling". Ask one to show you. Much easier to demonstrate than describe. Any recording of Gymnopedie will show you what the result sounds like.



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