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The second way is the only way I can play that shape, as my ring-finger does not bend backwards, and I'd have claimed that it's the way most guitarists play it. Plus, the second method allows you to move your ring-finger to the next fret to get a sus4 voicing, which adds color. When using the CAGED system, I like to keep all my fingers in play.


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I use and teach both ways. Tend to use the three fingers on the wider frets, and change to the one finger + barre version when the frets are too narrow - around 5/6. The ring finger HAS to bend backwards, so as to allow the top string to sound. There are a couple of other ways, though, using two fingers to cover the 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings. Looking at your ...


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While there is a "rule" that one shouldn't play black notes with the thumb, it isn't a hard-and-fast rule. The hard-and-fast rule is that you should use whatever fingering most easily plays the music you're trying to play. The reason that the scales (and all the arpeggios that don't have all black keys) never use the thumb on black keys is because there ...


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Since the next set of arpeggios is basically a mirror of the previous set, I would suggest moving your hand down, and using the same fingering if you are comfortable with it.As in: 5 2 1 2 1 2 shift 5 2 1 2 1 2


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As Kilian Foth states, the arpeggio is the same spacing as the Ab one earlier in the bar. If that fingering works, then the same fingering will work for the Eb arp. in the second half. Because they are arps, the sustain pedal will help the lower note, and also make the part sound better. However, I'd spread my hand to play 5-3-2-1-2-3.


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Your proposed 5 2 1 2 1 2 breaks the basic "rule" of scale and arpeggio fingering, which is your thumb always plays a white note - unless there are no white notes at all, of course. Note: of course that rule doesn't apply to the right hand - the Eb Ab C is not really an arpeggio, it's just a 3-note chord, and there is no problem fingering it 5-1-3, 4-1-2, ...


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Many musicians learn to overcome various handicaps (including missing fingers) and become very accomplished on their instrument of choice. People play with their head and their heart - their fingers are just a means to execute what they wish to express musically. Given enough desire and commitment, anyone can learn to play piano or guitar with fewer than ...


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I assume you are talking about the bars with LH notes .... F C A F | A Gb Eb A .... | Using 4 on the last F in the bar doesn't buy you anything, since it's a weak finger and most likely you still can't reach the bottom A from that hand position. Either use 5 and then "jump" down to another 5, or use 3 (or even 2) on the F, with your hand already moving ...


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Note: Internet advice on piano fingering is always suspect, since it comes from random people all over the world, who probably have completely different physiognomy, experience and attitudes than you do. That said, these left hand figures are clearly intended to be played with one position per group, even though they span more notes than the average hand. I ...


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We don't know the tempo, but since the 16-notes are marked as two triplets, not one sextuplet, it might be better to move your hand on the (half)-beat, i.e. something like 51-3-1 4-2-1 or 51-2-1 5-2-1. There's nothing obviously "wrong" with your 51-5-2 1-2-1 (or 51-5-3 1-3-1), if that works for you. A fingering like 51-1-5-3-2-1 might tend to put a false ...


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There is never a "correct" answer for fingering, but I suggest: (51)-5-3-2-1-2 (but the last finger depends rather on what comes next) At the beginning: it is usually better to avoid repeating a finger on a key, and the thinking behind the perhaps surprising initial jump is that your hand "knows" where the second F# is, because your thumb is sitting on it. ...



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