Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

If you wait to truly master something before moving on, it will take literally forever to make much progress. Once you've learned something fairly well, it's good to take the next step. It's also good to come back to things again and again. I've found that with most learning, it's a process of 2 steps forward one step back. This let's you keep learning ...


7

The first thing you want to work is the independence between your thumb and fingers. There is a video of Tommy Emmanuel on Youtube explaining how to do this, and it's actually what got me started. Back ago, I wrote some sort of thumbpicking tutorial, in Portuguese (with examples in a SoundCloud set), which tells you to do more or less the same things that ...


7

Steel strings are under higher tension than nylon, so, whether they are round-wound, flat-wound or taped, they will still require greater pressure to fret and pick. You can go to a lighter gauge, which will reduce the pressure needed, but your sound will become brighter, and the bass response of the guitar will be reduced; you're moving less metal, which ...


7

In order to sweep-pick, you need to have both an up- and a down-stroke. Fingerstyle bass really only has upstrokes (with the fingers). I think the closest you could get to actual sweep picking on bass would be to imitate Victor Wooten's double-thumb slap technique. In this technique, he uses his thumb sort of like a pick. He slaps the string in a ...


7

I don't know of anything that will target Sungha Jung's style specifically, but I don't see that as a problem. There are a few skills you need (in my opinion) to become a good fingerstyle guitarist, and if you master them you'll be able to mimic Sungha Jung or develop your own style: Play bass and melody independently Change quickly between chords Learn ...


5

Different styles fit different people, so correct or optimal has many answers. I would have used: 2* 4 4 3 3 2 1 * or 1 if strings are inadvertently muted (I'm assuming we're talking left hand fingers here, fingerstyle guitar usually means the that the right hand fingers are used to strum.)


4

The basic idea of a sweep picking is that you don't go past your next note. It's more like slow strumming. This allows you to pick much faster than with alternate picking, but it only is applicable if each picked note is on the next string (either up or down). Note that you can play multiple notes per string with hammer ons and pull offs. To experiment ...


4

I try to sort of press enough to "hook" into a portion of my callus, and then I can pull at a more upward angle, maybe 50ยบ or so. If done too hard, the string'll buzz against the fret for the first few vibrations, but that's the only negative I've found. However guitar's a secondary instrument for me, so I don't play as much as I wish; you may have much ...


4

Just use your middle finger. Some situations require you to use the thumb, but I don't think this is the case. If the position and dynamic doesn't strictly requires you to use your thumb, don't use it. Also, be aware that the use of the thumb in that hand is discouraged in some styles, and not even possible in some scenarios. I suggest you to check ...


3

There are a variety of techniques you can learn, and they are useful for different purposes. When choosing which one to use, let your ear guide you. This is not a comprehensive list of techniques, but it covers the basics: You can pluck repeatedly upwards with the same finger. This is the easiest technique to learn. It leaves your other fingers free to ...


3

There are two well-established methods for fingerpicking. In classical guitar technique, one uses four fingers: the fingertips and fingernails of the thumb and the index, middle and ring fingers. In guitar fingering diagrams, they are designated "p" (thumb), "i" (index), "m" (middle), and "a" (ring), from the names of the fingers in Spanish: pulgar, indice, ...


3

Start by imitating people whose style you like. Then you can use what you learn when you're making your own music. I listened to the video you posted and here is what I hear: Basic 2-beat pattern for 7 measures (if in 2/4) Simple fill (one note at a time, 3 or 4 notes in a row) for 1 measure Repeat with a different basic pattern I heard the following ...


3

Rasgueado works for a lot of metal. I do a fair bit on some of our songs where we kill the distortion but want to keep some power in the rhythm. It sounds much fatter, while keeping sharp attack, as all five nails can hit the strings in very quick succession. It also can give really fast strums, which may be difficult using other techniques.


3

When I play this, or other parts like it..going from finger picking to a strum, I just put my thumb and first finger together, LIKE I'm holding a pick and just use my fingertips. I have short nails too, but there's enough to get a good sounding strum. Or I kind of drag all my fingertips, nails touching the strings.


3

It all depends how you many notes you want to ring on, and for how long. Using the approach you describe (with a middle-finger barre) you can keep all the notes (except the C on string 2) ringing until you get to the last note, where you will have to lift the middle-finger barre to get to the F#. And yes, this is a little tricky, and would just need ...


3

It varies on which level you are currently. Basically there are two parts in playing finger-picking guitar. Left hand techniques and right hand techniques. I will try to explain them in brief. Also there are many types of playing styles in fingerpicking. Like classical, blues fingerpicking and hybrid picking where you use a flatpick as well as fingers. You ...


3

As long as you feel comfortable with your pinky in the E string it's ok. As for advantages, you might find it easier to play arpeggios of 5 and 6 strings (since you have almost all strings covered), or as well play different melodies along the strings at the same time. It is not anything you couldn't do with the common finger position on the strings, but ...


3

I'm also using my pinky a lot when finger picking. In this way there's not so much difference switching between pure finger picking and hybrid picking. So that's another benefit of this approach. With hybrid picking your index finger is not available, so there it's natural to use the pinky more. Plucking two adjacent strings feels more natural with the ...


3

I don't see any way to finger that chord other than using the index for the bass note, and I don't see any way to play the arpeggio other than using the index finger on G string fret 7, so I don't see how you could keep the bass note ringing. If you MUSt keep the bass note and don't mind changing the octave of one of the other notes, then you could play the ...


2

Even with very short fingernails, there'll still be a difference between your upstroke and your downstroke. The sides of your fingernails striking the strings will make your downstroke more percussive than your upstroke, which will produce a tone that's a little softer than the upstroke. Neither will produce as crisp a sound as a pick. With no pick, I ...


2

Don't break apart the different rhythms and practice them individually. At this stage, it's more effective if you don't think of yourself playing two separate parts simultaneously. Instead, think of playing one part that happens to have two or more notes at a time and start slowly. For example, here's a typical Travis-picking bass-and-lead bit on a C ...


2

You're correct about the ornament in green: the 5th fret note (an E) just before the 7th fret note (an F#) is called a grace note, and it is to meant to be a very short note played in anticipation of the main note (the F#). How short is "very short"? That's up to you. As for the indication in red: the 'g.' indicates a glissando, meaning a slide from the ...


2

As noted in the music, this looks like Bm7 played at the 7th fret, and then a slide and lift movement to G in the "open position." While this makes sense for the 2nd ornament, this makes the first ornament appear more difficult, but the fifth fret on the B string is the "same note" as the open E string. This means that instead of a hammer on from 5 to 7 on ...


2

Presumably you're doing this practice in order to learn the skills involved in the exercise. If you move on and lose the skill, the whole endeavour was pointless. Even an 80% reproduction rate is pretty low so I don't think you are getting good enough at the exercise before moving on. Of course this depends on how absolute your definition of "perfect" is. ...


2

It depends on a piece. What if a classical piece has a passage of fast 16th notes which land on the bass strings? If you adhere to the rule that only the thumb plays those strings, it means having to play that passage with the thumb, rather than by alternately picking with the index and middle finger. Or what if a bass line rises high, and is most easily ...


2

Hard and fast rules will only guide you to what people have found worked for them. There is nothing wrong with changing to suit yourself. The thumb sounds good on the lowest two strings, as that's where the bass line often runs, so a fleshy sound is appropriate.A pattern I sometimes use involves only the top four strings, so I use thumb on 4 and 3, with top ...


2

If you feel comfortable playing with your little finger, congratulations. You have the advantage. There's absolutely nothing wrong with it. After all, you use your (probably even weaker) left hand pinkie too. And pianists use their every finger. Most classical guitarists play only with their four or even three first fingers because they find using their ...


2

To a great extent, what the Garageband fingerpicking simulations are what's known as "rolls". To perform a roll, you hold down a chord shape, and pick the strings in a particular order. For example, hold down an open G chord, and pick: G on the low E string for a crotchet G on the high E string for a crotchet B on the A string for a quaver B on the B ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible