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You can play an acoustic guitar exactly the same way. It can be more difficult since there is generally less space between the strings, but is still doable especially if you keep your nails in good shape (which may be difficult since steel or copper strings will put more wear on them than nylon does). There are many different ways to play that are all ...


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Fingerstyle is...different. I took up guitar very late in life and for my own pleasure, and so only learned fingerstyle. I can't strum worth a damn, so for me fingerstyle is easier. The key, I think, is learning how to keep the rhythm of an alternating bass in the thumb. I would start by trying to learn so-called Travis picking, where you play a fixed ...


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The best resource I have found to develop the right hand finger picking technique is the 120 Arpeggio study from Giuliani. Here is a link. This is a collection of arpeggio's that are an excellent way to develop your picking technique. With that I would also do scales. For finger picking there is six basic ways to practice your scales. Off course you will ...


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Adding to Rockin's usual helpful answer, lighter strings, while being easier to press down, will also be more prone to rattle. So you'll have to be just as firm, but for a slightly different reason, although the outcome is the same. Also, in setting up, having substantially different strings will often necessitate changing the intonation - the open length of ...


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The buzzing might because the strings are tuned too low or the guitar is not properly set up (refer to Rockin Cowboy's answer). But it might also be because your fingers don't yet have enough strength to push the string hard enough into the fret. Light strings can help with that, since they have lower tension. However, as a beginner I was quite averse to ...


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The short answer is that lighter gauge strings will be easier to play and easier to get clear tone when you fret the notes. Most beginners and even many seasoned guitarist prefer lighter gauge strings. But going from medium gauge to extra light gauge will probably create the need for a new set up. So let's talk a little about "set up" for acoustic ...


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If you mean the pinkie on your fretting hand, this should not be a problem when playing chords as long as you can easily transition to and from chords that involve the pinkie in fretting. I just played through a number of chord progressions on my guitar and noticed that when moving to chords that involved the use of the pinkie as a fretting finger, having ...


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Most often this happens simply because your pinky is controlled by some of the same musculature as your other fingers. Every instrumentalist knows all too well that the ring and middle fingers are almost impossible to move independently (until you learn how to compensate). It's not so bad with the pinky, but the same principle applies. If you curl the other ...


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So to sum up, why should I play different notes in that way, and how would I know to play in that way, or is there no way of telling. That's an excellent question with more than one answer. The guitar is different from say a piano in that there are usually several different strings where you can play the exact same note at the exact same pitch. ...


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Kirk and Tim's answers are good. I'd like to add that your guitar's tone will sound different when you play the same pitch on different strings. One way of playing notes can sound totally different on different strings and positions (in regard to tone, and feel). The tab that you show allows for the open B string to ring, while also playing the same B ...


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It's not directly apparent from the dots that some of the B notes need to be played on open B, while others are played on the D string. It's rather like the tune stays on the D string, with an accompaniment of open Bs in between each of the notes. Listen carefully and you'll hear a difference in tone between the first few B notes. You will also be able to ...


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Yes, use the seventh position (VII), which may be inferred from the TAB shown. The difference between the open E and the E as indicated is that they are an octave apart. You want to be in this position because of the bass B which shows up in the ninth measure. Eventually (in measure 17) you will double these E notes for a fuller bass. You will discover that ...



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