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12

Two months isn't a worry. You won't forget how to play the instrument, you won't lose the muscles, you won't lose the techniques. The only problem that may happen is that your fingers may begin to soften due to not playing. However, the only difference you'll notice is a little more feeling in the fingers when fingering notes and chords. They will harden ...


10

Some professions are very much about knowledge and the ability to exercise that knowledge, others are more about skill. Music is very much about skill, and the thing with skills is that they take a long time to develop. With the exception of people with a natural aptitude, it takes a lot of time and patience -- there is just no way around it. So what can ...


7

First of all, Gipsy Kings music isn't classical :) Gipsy Kings play Flamenco guitar, major of their works is Rumba type. Spanish guitar basically is two types: Spanish classic guitar. Famous players: Andres Segovia, John Williams, Julian Bream. Flamenco guitar. Famous players: Paco De Lucia, Vicente Amigo, Gerardo Nunez, Sabicas and of course many ...


7

You need to understand that flamenco rhythm is very different from classical or popular music (it has more in common with Indian Classical music and the concept of "Tala"). All flamencos talk about rhythm using the notion of "compas" - these are rhythmic "styles", that include a time structure, as well as a feel and a usual tempo. For example, Bulerias ...


6

I agree. "Flamenco" is a very specific style of guitar which incorporates many techniques that are specific to the nylon-string classical guitar. Or more specifically, the Flamenco guitar which is slightly different. Flamenco guitars traditionally have the clear-plastic "golpeador" or tap-plate on the front so you can do the percussive effects without ...


5

Here is what I read from my guitar book: Most authorities agree that the best approach to flamenco technique is through careful study of basic classic guitar technique. Because of the unusual and striking effects required to perform true flamenco music, the playing technique is necessarily somewhat different; however, the basic technique of playing the ...


5

Playing Flamenco style on a steel string guitar will be rather painful I am afraid. Also, you will be getting an overly bright sound, and it won't sound anything like traditional Flamenco playing, which is nearly always played on a nylon string guitar. With this style of playing, there are a lot of subtle things you have to know, much like classical ...


5

Based on a quick survey of my flamenco music books, here is a quick survey: Gypsy Kings: 18 songs in 2/4, 7 songs in 4/4. Django Rheinhart (gypsy, not flamenco): 13 songs, all 4/4. Paco de Lucia: 8 in 3/4, 1 in 4/4, 4 in 3/8, 1 in 6/8. Sample YouTubes by signature: 2/4. Bamboleo, by Gypsy Kings. 3/4. Bulerias by Paco de Lucia. 4/4. Garrotin. ...


5

You don't need to buy a new guitar - any acoustic, classical or flamenco guitar will be fine. If you are an experienced flamenco guitarist you will already have the ability to pick the strings and notes you want, so the difference is going to be mostly about the feel of the music. Both flamenco and blues are very emotional styles, but where flamenco can be ...


5

Fingerstyle blues is very satisfying; it's about 80% of what I do. I always recommend the same first step for the aspiring blues player...Listen to the blues. Go to the masters. Go to YouTube and listen to the old Delta and Chicago and Texas bluesmen that were responsible for inventing the style. Robert Johnson, Skip James, Mississippi John Hurt, Muddy ...


5

Another factor is that, compared to the classical guitar and the flamenco guitar, the typical steel-string acoustic guitar has a very narrow string spacing, at the nut, at the bridge, and everywhere inbetween. This narrow string spacing is not sufficient to play the left-hand fingerings required of classical or flamenco guitar, and is not sufficient to ...


4

Don't ever play Flamenco on metal string guitar, you will break your nails. Not to mention you aren't going to sound Flamenco any way. Rasgueados and Alzapua are all about hitting the strings with your nails. Flamenco playing is so demanding on the right hand and takes a lot of time and efforts to develop decent techniques, you have to pay special ...


4

I play Flamenco guitar. Flamenco guitar players tend to keep their nails a little bit longer but not that long. Because if you keep long nails, you will hear the friction of your nails with the strings. Not to mention that long nails will make it really difficult to play the guitar. Try to play tirando and apoyando with long nails and you will know. However ...


3

Looks like a kind of Rasgueado to me.


3

I suspect the elusive part of "good backing tracks" is going to be the "good" part. The kind of stuff you're likely to find for sale is likely to be rather "soulless". It'll sync nicely with a metronome, but you may end up sounding like you have a metronome permanently mounted in your ear. I think it may be more useful to focus on find "good pieces" that ...


3

There are no so many similarities between blues and flamenco. You should start on standart blues scheme (it is available even on Wiki - it's quite easy to learn - and after that just learn some songs of various groups, until you can't improvise youself.


2

So... Do you want a long-winded rant??? Actually, this question is difficult to answer because the range of "Spanish Music" is vast, even for the guitar. There's Spanish Baroque guitar music, which uses a 5-course guitar, all but the highest course double-strung. There's a strong movement of people playing this music on period instruments (I have one ...


2

While Chiron is correct, there is a fair amount of crossover betwen the two styles. If you play Spanish Classical pieces by Albeniz and Tarrega and even Sor, you will find rasgueados, trills, tremolos, pinched harmonics, and other flamenco effects. It's clear that those guys were playing flamenco on the weekend. So know the difference, but study both. ...


2

The general rule is "one finger per fret". When playing single-note passages you should be looking for positions that do not require a lot of hand movement. If you find yourself changing positions several times during the course of a single passage, chances are that you aren't using the most efficient fingering. When playing chord forms, fingering is likely ...


2

Additional to Kyle Brand's ideas, which are clear and to the point, I always keep in my head the statements from Steve Vai on 'How to be Successful': I always find it inspiring and ...


2

it certainly is. you want to keep them a bit longer than the flesh of the finger. the thumb is much longer. you can experiment with that and see what works for you. the quality of the sound produced is significantly better. you will notice the difference for sure. it also influences the quality and ease of playing the guitar, at least from my personal ...


2

(Let's start by assuming that you are using the common flamenco approach of starting the cycle of 12 beats on "12". This is highly confusing to most trained musicians, but it makes sense if you think of beginning the count on a clock face, which of course starts at the top, on 12). Keep in mind that there are number of distinct regional styles of Soleares, ...


2

Most common appears to be 3, 6, 8, 10 and 12, however I have heard a few that miss out the 12 and it is still recognisably Soleares. I can't find any definitive documentation one way or the other, although Wikipedia includes the 12th beat. I actually quite like using both forms within the same piece, for different sections.


2

If a guitarist has a mix of several playing styles, I am afraid that you will not be able to learn this as if it were one composite style. Rather, it would be good practice to learn all these styles, and then try to understand how he combines them, so that you can mimic this. This sounds like an extreme lot of work, but your understanding of these styles ...


2

I think, as far as I can find, that as you say it is a bit of an overstatement for what it is. I think it is very similar to a typical flamenco style, with the only reference being to a guy quoted as "Amin Toufani". The only guy of a similar name who is a flamenco guitarist, is a guy called Amin Toofani, who is known for his youtube viral video ...


2

It is rasguedo, with a touch of tremolo where he plays the same note several times in succession. The rasguedo is strumming the strings with several fingers, one after the other in a sort of flicking motion.


1

That's not a problem. I used to go for 6 months (intense work and stuff). You get a bit technique loss (a tiny bit, and only if you were playing very delicate stuff before), but that can easily be recovered. I actually noticed an increase and refreshment in creativity. If you keep listening to music at all times, you're still developing yourself as a ...


1

worldmusictracks.com. You can ask for tracks without guitars.


1

I realize that when I replied earlier I didn't really answer the last part of your question, which is whether it makes a difference to have long nails on the strumming hand - I simply assumed they are required! At one point in classical guitar technique there was a controversy over playing with nails or without, with the nail-less camp feeling the sound was ...


1

I recommend the book and DVD Pumping Nylon by Scott Tennant, which has a very good section on nail shaping and how to play with your nails.



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