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This is a seriously overengineered solution. Like several others stated, you should really invest in actual musician earplugs which are designed for attenuating with a constant frequency response rather than focusing on the most "disturbing" frequencies which also happen to be the most important ones for, well, not being annoying to the audience. Yes, they ...


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This might not be good enough in terms of sound quality but my thought was you could use a smartphone/tablet, Some phones like the high end Lumias have very good microphones (maybe modern iPhones too) and you can buy a separate microphone for your iPhone for sure - and of course then you can plug headphones in as normal. It could be a much cheaper way to ...


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I've been learning flute for 11 months, and I have only very partial control over the 2nd octave. If you are comfortable in the first two octaves after just 6 months, I'd say you're doing better than me. To your question, I also have times when nothing is working right, and I can't tell whether it's the flute or me that has gone haywire. Personally, I tend ...


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Look at what singers say about breath support -- same thing for flute. You need to balance tension in the muscles in your abdomen used for expiration with that in those used for inspiration, to get more control of just how fast the air is moving up through your mouth (since that has to change going from one note to another and going from soft to loud). ...


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If the flute tends to roll inward, toward you, when you have most fingers raised, that is probably due to the heavy key mechanism on top of the flute being tilted too much toward you. Roll the flute out so as to balance the heavy part more toward the top of the flute as you hold it. Since you'll have to adapt other aspects of your embouchure to compensate ...


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Turning the flute in is your way of angling the air stream from your lips downward more steeply into the embouchure hole. But try instead using your lips to do that. Let the upper lip loosen up so it goes out further from your teeth, and/or pull your lower lip inwards, possibly moving the flute downward a little on your chin.


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Look at what David Klee says about the embouchure for low notes in this instructional video: You draw back the corners of your mouth and stiffen your upper lip. (that link is, using ...


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Trevor Wye, in Practice Books for the Flute, Tone, p. 5, explains why long tone practice is good: "... provided he [the student] can hear the undesirable aspects of his tone, his self-correcting mechanism will ensure that it improves." I take it, that mechanism is biofeedback. However, I think I've identified an aspect of embouchure that this doesn't work ...


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It's one of the joys of being human! We can't always switch on and be whatever we want. Mental and physical states have a lot to do with it. Some of my pupils play fantastically at some lessons, but if they come, say, after playing a football match or a couple of hours maths coaching, they might at well go straight home! Try to be able to play at any time ...


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Aside from double/triple tonguing there is really no different technique. However, what you noticed is a discrepancy on how one should tongue. A vast of majority of teachers in the elementary and or high school level will teach their students to either tongue either right behind their teeth (what you were probably taught) which is the "tut" deal or right in ...


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Internet video lessons are an amazing resource - whether free or paid - and good ones will show you great technique plus you can watch over and over rather than get confused and have to wait until your next lesson to check with the tutor. The main thing you miss is someone watching you and noticing the things you are doing wrong. But "online" doesn't have ...



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