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8

"All music is folk music. I ain't never heard a horse sing a song." -- Louis Armstrong First off, let's narrow things down a bit here. It sounds like you're talking about American folk music rather than folk music as a whole. Other folk musics would take a book to explain. American folk music has the following characteristics: Acoustic instruments ...


7

A short answer: Scarborough Fair is not in the minor, but is modal: Dorian (that's where the major IV chord comes from) and Aeolian (the minor iv). The modal character is underscored by the progression VII-i, which is normal for Dorian and Aeolian, and the fact that there is no major V chord. And no, this doesn't come from Bach- its roots are probably ...


7

There are some things that will make you lose less: a big revelation for me was when I realized I was using way more bow and force than necessary. A combination of weight (literal weight, let gravity do more of the work than muscle) and a slow stroke using minimal bow length helped a lot. Also, the examples here are amplified; if possible, practice the ...


4

A great deal of it is improvised, much in the same sense that Indian Raga is improvised. That is to say, a lot of melodic framework and development is predetermined, but there is a lot of room to work around the predefined bits. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_maqam explains this well.


4

Well, for one, there are many more cultures in Russia than just Russians. If it's Siberian you're looking for, then search for that. And other regions nearby. There's also some musical overlap between Siberian, Mongolian, and Tuvan folk styles. "Peoples of Russia" is a good search term for general ethnographic information. There have been several books with ...


4

The drum kit does not feature much in Traditional Irish music. Why not sit down at your kit with headphones and play along with some of the pogues numbers or whatever songs you'd like to be able to play? There are apps and software to slow the tune down so you can figure out what the drummer is doing. But as you say, the style is mostly based on rock and ...


3

You will not find a scale that contains all those chords. But you don't have to. There is a term "chromatic". It describes notes and chords that don't use the notes of the "scale of the key". You don't need to "borrow" chords from anywhere, it's perfectly alright to be firmly in C major but use a Fm chord. Think the end of that very simple tune "When ...


3

Apart from the common use of the major and minor chords that occur in songs - I,IV,V,ii,iii,vi - another set of chords is sometimes used, from the PARALLEL key. Thus, say in C, the chord pool is C,Dm,Em,F,G,Am, but also Cm,Eb,Fm,Gm,Ab,Bb. I've left out the more rarely used dims.


3

The song Tu, manu seserėlė was taken from Anton Juszkiewicz’s Melodje ludowe litewskie, (number 157 in the collection. You can see a copy of the tune. In abc format: X:157 T:Tu, manu seserėlė C:Trad. M:3/4 K:B L:1/4 edB|G2d|1c2d:|2c2c|:edc|f2e|d2c|edB|G2d|c2c:|


3

Many of the old traditional folk songs originated before the advent of recorded music. Typically folk songs were composed for the enjoyment of friends and family and neighbors with no thought of profiting commercially, thus there was no desire or need to copyright the songs or even write them down. Many folk songs became popular and were transmitted ...


3

"All music is folk music. I ain't never heard a horse sing a song." -- Louis Armstrong American folk music has the following characteristics: Acoustic instruments Simple chord progressions such as C-F-G or Am-G Simple time signatures such as 3/4 or 4/4 "Sharp" or natural keys such as C, D, E, G or A Simple scales such as pentatonic minor (blues), ...


3

Bela Bartok was an Ethnomusicologist too.. he was known to have collected some gypsy songs, for example: -> If you are searching for a book on this subject, Bela Bartok's Studies in Ethnomusicology seems to be interesting: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=LKQuRowyjPcC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Bela+Bartok+Studies+...


2

Done properly, you don’t need to lose hairs. You end up losing hairs when you have too much sideways or twisting movement. It’s the type of movement that makes you break them, not the aggressiveness. I don’t do it enough to be comfortable explaining, especially in words rather than in person with instrument in hand, so I’ll refer you to the world’s experts. ...


2

When rock guitarists sacrifice their guitars in what appears to be a moment of pure emotion it is often pre-planned and they have already swapped to a cheaper guitar than their main instrument(s). Perhaps you could keep some cheaper bows purely for this technique? Another idea, though from a different context, would be to try a viola bow. I know that Steve ...


2

While you could say the piece is in A minor, it doesn't really use the tonal ideas brought from the common practice period. If it did, you would see E or E7 much more instead of Em. The piece builds more off the naturally constructed chords of the A minor scale which means it uses much more modal ideas and I wouldn't expect certain tonal ideas, like the ...


1

Just to add the given answers. The reason why you would think this is Aeolian and not just plain minor has all to do with that minor dominant chord. In minor keys you have a raised Leading Tone. This has the effect of bringing the third of a chord built on the fifth note of the scale up a semitone. This also gives you a Major chord. In the Aeolian mode you ...


1

You need to back up a bit, to see the wood and not the trees, you can't break it down like that, you can't do one without the other nor t'other without the one, so because it's not logical to talk of it distinctly, there's no term for it. It all comes from beat, where interference patterns make new tones in the harmonics. Xenakis is talking about one of the ...


1

Folk Music in my opinion is a style based on lyrics too. It is communication to the listener that is straight forward on subject matter they can relate to specifically. A political position in a song to inform the listener and persuade them to agree with the writer is a type of folk song. A song that is handed down through generations describing life ...


1

I don't know about that peice in particular, but yes, there is a type of music where, as you said: a soloist sings slowly without much of a repeated melody. In Arabic, it's called a "mawwal" (Arabic: موال). I know in Turkish it's "uzun hava" (according to what a Turkish friend told me). I'm sure it has different names in Krudish and Persian as well. It's ...



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