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10

You should certainly not feel confined to conventional musical forms. All the forms described in the Wikipedia article you link to were invented by somebody; you are free to invent your own. The list in the Wikipedia article is bound to be incomplete. However, be aware that people enjoy the familiarity of certain forms. To use the poetry analogy from the ...


9

This is going to start off sounding off-topic, but I promise it's not. My mom was (before she retired) a high-school English teacher, and when she taught poetry, she used the following analogy: Imagine a game of tennis between top pros, how exciting and energetic it can be. Now imagine that same game, but remove the white lines on the court. Now remove ...


7

There are three different things here: the sonata(-allegro) form, the (multi-movement) sonata form, and the title sonata. The sonata(-allegro) form is a form of one movement. It's usually fast (hence the allegro) and the big structure is ABA, where the first A is called exposition, B is development, and the second A is recapitulation. Sometimes there's a ...


6

In pop/rock music, the commonest terms are: Intro - a part that leads into the main part of the song Verse - you know what a verse is Chorus - you know what a chorus is Bridge - sometimes called a Middle Eight, especially if it's eight bars long - a part that leads from verse to chorus, or vice versa, usually used just once in a song to add variety. ...


6

Lots of people, particularly in the rock and roll idiom, would call this the riff. It's an easily recognizable component that defines the song. Lots of rock songs are similarly defined by, and built around, a particular riff, so it makes sense that one would refer to that section of the song as such.


6

I have often used graph paper to create a left-to-right timeline where each cube of the graph paper represents a unit of time (say 5 seconds, or 15 seconds). I then "draw" the form, sometimes getting carried away with colored pencils and such. I then try to compose the music in-line with the formal diagram. This doesn't always work and sometimes leads to ...


6

Slim's answer is very good; there are pros and cons to both approaches. However, I wanted to add that following a particular form can be challenging and interesting, and can in fact add to the beauty and other aspects of a song beyond what one could do by ignoring them. For example, someone who is a natural at writing 4-piece rock songs might never dream ...


4

If you're not following any existing form, it becomes encumbant on you to construct the form anew. Without form, you'll have real difficulty making the song listenable beyond a certain length. It's the same with programming. Beyond a few thousand lines, the lack of structure makes the entire enterprise unweildy. So it is very useful to learn how to follow ...


4

I think the Semester IV of this online course could be relevant : http://academic.udayton.edu/PhillipMagnuson/soundpatterns/ You could ask yourself if the Cubism maintains/modifies/completely changes the different aspects of music : Tonality Vocabulary Texture Sonority Time Edit: As a complement, you can also read about the friendship between Georges ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm just a hobby composer and I'm not very original either, so anything I say can be called BS. However, your question resonates with me and I do have some answers. I'd say form is definitely important to me. My writing usually revolves around a melodic theme and its development. Classical forms like sonata, fugue and invention are pretty good ...


3

I like several of the answers here and I'll add my two cents. A musical form is a constraint that you chose to adopt when you're composing. This can seen as bad, but it may free your mind to explore some other ideas that just would not occur to you if you were following what "sounds good" to you. I believe that musical forms can suppress creativity, but so ...


2

This is a nice set of answers, thanks for posting the question. Here is my contribution. First, form is everywhere in music and communication in general -- form is information. This starts what instruments you chose and how you chose to play them -- diatonic vs. microtonal scales, tuning, pitches, etc. Musical forms provide you temporal and/or harmonic ...


2

Disclaimer: not an expert in composition, and definitely no more than a semester college instruction in composition in classical music. At the end of the day, what is best to do is what works best for you. Unless you're doing improv, nobody's listening to your process, they're listening to your finished piece. Results are what matter. That said, some ...


1

I suggest you to follow a similar dynamic to what Gary Burton suggests in his Inroduction to Jazz Improvisation course: https://www.coursera.org/course/improvisation It's not for complete beginners, but you can follow a similar methodology from the very start. Get familiar with scales and chords. Start simple. Add new chords and scales as you progress. ...


1

I assume you seek an empirical answer, but here is a philosophical one. I am giving such an answer because I deem giving the kind of answer which I assume you seek as impossible. Below is my argument for why it is impossible. How can I tell an SUV apart from a van? What are some of the things that make a truck different from a lorry? Before you evaluate ...



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