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9

These are jazz articulations, and as a french horn player you'll really just have to do your best imitation of what a trumpet player would do. You might want to ask a trumpet player in your ensemble for some advice and demonstration. What I'd suggest for the shake is a VERY rapid lip slur from the written note to about a fifth above. It's written forte, and ...


7

2/4 is isomorphic to cut time, and as the article excerpt states, they idiomatic french horn rhythm would occur on both of the upbeats in the measure. In other words, the second and fourth eighth notes of a 2/4 bar.


6

Bob has a lot of good information in his answer. I'll just add abit more here. As I'm sure you know (but I'll repeat for the sake of others, and for clarity), horn players tend to specialize in either higher parts or lower parts. They are typically notated with one "high" horn and one "low" horn per staff. So you usually have: Staff One: Horn I (high) ...


6

Okay, I just pulled out a few scores from my bookcase (looked at some Berlioz, Bartok, Stravinsky and Brahms so far…). In the scores at least, nearly all of the horns are written on two treble (G) clef staves. The scores are all transposing, so I can't see any reason why this wouldn't also be the case for the parts. I do know that horn parts are commonly ...


5

It's very different! The mouthpiece is smaller than a trumpet's, yet the instrument's range covers that of a trombone. And, while you can get away with playing flugelhorn like a trumpet, if you play the horn like a trumpet not many people are going to want to listen to you. My advice would be to essentially relearn the horn fingerings from scratch instead ...


5

Db Piccolo Db Piccolo's first came about when bands began to be dominated by early brass instruments, and repertoires were adjusted to suitable keys for brass instruments - which created awkward fingerings for the old, simple system, C piccolos. (The simple system limited the keys the instrument could easily play in.) By creating the Db piccolo, piccolo ...


4

A harmonic minor sounds "Egyptian" or "Arabic" depending on how you use it. Use of the scale is deeply woven into the European classical music tradition. Occurrences of the scale in, for instance, Baroque music are not strikingly "Arabic" in mood. Here is an exmaple. The "Allemande" from J. S. Bach's E minor suite for guitar (BWV 996) has a quick, ...


3

Cadenzas often have a slightly different musical style than the works they are based on -- for example, Joachim's standard cadenzas for the Mozart violin concerti -- but are not usually way off. For example, I wouldn't expect a cadenza in a Mozart horn concerto to include a bunch of pedal notes or lip glissandi or other techniques that were not commonly ...


3

"In band music, the Db piccolo, rather than the larger orchestral C piccolo, was the mainstay until the early 20th Century, when the Db parts were gradually transposed for the C piccolo because of its stronger tone." Source: http://kjt.glis.net/tealflutestudio/PiccoloEbTenor.html Wikipedia might help a little on the Eb horn, but I don't have ...


3

This question is a little difficult to address for a couple reasons: 1.) A harmonic minor scale is a Western-European approximation of eastern tonal characteristics - much in the same way a pentatonic scale stereo types Eastern-Asian culture. 2.) "Traditional" Egyptian tonal materials do not fit into Western notation, so if you were honestly going to write ...


2

Horns have a very extensive range (From F#2 to C6) so it will depend more on the part itself. If the part is written in the higher range of the horn then a treble clef will be used. If the part is written in the lower range of the horn then a bass clef is used. Typically horns 2 and 4 will play the lower part and if it fits better in bass clef then it should ...


2

There's no evidence that cutting the bell makes any perceivable difference in the tone quality. If it did, professionals would go for one piece bells despite the (slight) inconvenience of a more awkwardly shaped instrument case. I'm not aware of any scientific studies, but many people claim a noticeable difference between a lacquered horn and an ...


1

I'll add to the already good answers here that there are some examples of horn parts in the score being re-arranged to (sometimes) facilitate clef changes. Looking at the score for Mahler's Fifth Symphony, the first movement calls for 6 horns, and the parts are arranged differently in the score on a per-system basis. It begins with the parts grouped on two ...



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