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20

The spacing is designed to offer useful milestones on the fretboard. Take the notes on the 6th string (in standard tuning), for example: Open (0th fret) is E. The F is only 1 fret away, why put a marker on the 1st fret? It's already marked by being the first fret The G is on fret 3, so put a marker there. The A is on fret 5, which is a perfect 4th from ...


19

Maple boards are typically placed on Swamp Ash or brighter wood bodies and it lends a snap to the tone of the guitar. Rosewood is known to be much mellower, and usually makes it's way on mahogany bodies and necks. They definitely feel different too. A maple neck is harder and feels very smooth under your fingers, while rosewood has some sponginess to it due ...


12

Multi-string guitars The idea of fanned frets is, in essence, to combine the baritone or bass guitar with the regular guitar in one instrument. Fanned frets enable strengthening the tone of the lower strings by giving them a longer speaking string length. They can also enable a high string that can be tuned higher than is possible on a conventional guitar ...


11

Welcome to the wonderful world of non-standard intonation. You will like it here. I have answered here on instruments where you have to dictate the intonation: slide and steel guitar and theremin. I haven't mentioned violin/fiddle, because by the time you're good enough for it to be worthwhile to ask questions in this sort of forum, you've already learned ...


10

When converting a fretted instrument to fret less you have a couple of options if you want to DIY: Modify the current fingerboard in some way. This includes purchasing a fret-puller like @ekaj suggests, pulling out all the fretwires, and filling in all the fret slots with wood putty. Unfortunately you will suffer from the issues that @Alex mentions in that ...


9

"lower" strings are lower in pitch, the thick ones... Upper is higher. Lower frets are towards the nut, upper to the bridge. However, (and apparently in contradiction) we normally use "up" for say, bends where the strings are pushed towards the upper edge of the fretboard, and down for the opposite direction.. But only rarely is there a directional ...


9

There's some good related information on this question, so give that a read. A re-fret isn't always the best answer to a little fret buzz--sometimes a simple setup will fix it. Anything from simple truss rod adjustments, to new nut/saddle pieces could fix you up proper. However, if the problem has gradually evolved from a perfectly fine playing guitar then ...


7

I'm pretty sure you have to tune your bass to standard tuning. EADG so in order to play the notes in tune you'd have to put your finger on your left hand at the fret bar. If you wanted to play the notes at the center of the fret you would have to tune your bass accordingly, not a good idea IMO. On a standard bass even though you put your finger in between ...


7

One thing not mentioned in the post you link to about de-fretting a bass guitar is that after the frets are removed, and the fret slots are filled, it is common to apply a thick hard finish to the rosewood fretboard with marine epoxy or super glue (cyanoacrylate). This usually involves multiple coats of the finish and drying and fine sanding inbetween ...


7

Think of the reason you're giving names to notes: communication. So, it depends who you're communicating with, their expectations of you, and your expectations of them. When I play soprano ukulele, I think in terms of the guitar fretboard - the intervals between strings are the same as the top four strings of a guitar. So in my head, I play a guitar "D" ...


7

If you have a string or strings that go out of tune more and more as you go up the fretboard, you don't have a string issue. You have an intonation issue. We have a wide range of questions here on intonation, but basically the length of the string from nut to bridge is the problem. The quick check you can do is to play this string while fretting the 12th ...


6

As luthier Chris Larkin explains for this 9 string bass monster - To get suitable tension on the huge variation of string sizes it required different scale lengths for each string and so needed fan frets.


5

You're not insane, but you do run the risk of becoming so frustrated that you end up giving up playing, which would be a shame. Obviously, people can and do learn how to play on fretless instruments---upright bass, cello, violin, etc.---and do just fine. But it takes a lot of discipline, time, and patience to get to the point where you can play well. This ...


5

With great care. I wouldn't attempt this myself; but this looks like a good walk though of a scalloping procedure Fretboard Scolloping Just in addition to this, if I were you, I would consider buying a spare neck or two to experiment on; so as to leave your original neck intact until you are certain you have the technique correct. Here an example of a ...


5

Especially if everyone in your ensemble follows suit, you can think of this as playing with a different reference ptich frequency. Nowadays, most tuning uses a reference pitch of A'=440Hz. You can think of down-tuning your guitar as redefining this reference pitch to be a different, lower, frequency. For example, declaring A'=415Hz is the same as down ...


5

Only the finest and most expensive ebony is perfectly black. Most examples of ebony have pronounced brown stripes. So in almost all cases, guitar manufacturers put dye on their ebony fretboards to hide the imperfections. The dye they use is the same type used for leather. Here is an example from the Stewart MacDonald company. It appears that you bought a ...


5

WIth that fingering, have you tried plucking the 5th string on the nut side of your fretted point? You will find that the vibrating string between the nut and 7th fret gives the same note you are plucking on the 3rd string. Normally the nut side of each string will resonate a little if damped (which is why for tapping passages, many musicians use a nut ...


5

If it's an exceedingly low-quality product, it could just be that the fretboard is badly designed enough that the notes are just not in the right place, but realistically, all guitars exhibit tuning issues with fretted notes. Equal temperament is a compromise to begin with, and the guitar itself even more so. Assuming it's not actually a manufacturing ...


5

After 8 years you will not find any manufacturer guarantee, so getting a free repair for inlay damage is not going to happen. If you are not 100% confident, take it to a luthier, but this is actually a straightforward repair. Take off the strings. Carefully remove the inlay Remove the glue from underneath the inlay and from the slot it was in. You can ...


4

Maybe lost to history, the dots are references for the Fibonacci series, which when harmonics are considered, give a pure major chord with octave and perfect fifth redundancies. The dot at the 9th fret marks 2/5ths the string length. The harmonic there is of the 5th partial (the major third) -- this is the one that throws you off. This is my observation, ...


4

I have a Jackson soloist guitar, it has a compound radius fingerboard (12 to 16) string height is adjusted in exactly the same way as a straight neck. Since the highest curve is at the nut and the fingerboard 'flattens' out slowly as it gets closer to the bridge, and string height has to account for the highest point of the fret board; there isn't ...


4

The fret inlays (assuming they're vertical - those are the easiest to distinguish with) will tell you were the actual fret would be installed on the same neck. Since different types of guitars have different scale lengths, these are important to show you were the note sits on the fretboard. Technically it wouldn't matter what you tuned your bass to, as ...


3

If you have both kinds already, you should use them both! Some techniques are almost impossible on fretless, so it might be a bad idea to use it exclusively. But most ordinary stuff works quite well, so if you'd like to be able to play fretless at all I'd recommend practising as much on it as possible: like you said, it will improve your intonation skills, ...


3

This distance is known as the "action". Three things affect the action. The height of the nut - adjustable by shaving, shimming, replacing The height of the bridge - method of adjusting depends on the guitar type The curvature of the neck - on steel strung guitars, adjusted using the truss rod All of these can be adjusted, but it's really a job for a ...


3

All bass guitars should be tuned so that the open strings center on defined tones (usually [B]EADG[C], but drop-D and other tunings are common). This is true regardless of whether the instrument is fretted or fretless. Then, making sure you're in tune on a fretless instrument (whether that's a fretless bass guitar or a double bass) is about hearing the note ...


3

One difference is how you treat and care for one or the other as a guitar owner. Maple fretboards are usually varnished with the same finish (nitrocellulose, polyethylene, or other finishes) used on the rest of the neck. Thus they are sealed. Rosewood fretboards have no finish on them, and should be treated periodically with a wood conditioning oil. Also, ...


3

If what you're trying to do is memorize the note names, then it's best to stick with one tuning, and learn the notes in that tuning before moving on to others. Standard tuning is a good choice since it is the "standard". Learning the note names in this tuning will facilitate many other types of learning and communication with others within the guitar ...


3

Your guitar has an intonation problem. Intonation occurs due to the difference between the spacing of the frets, which are based on an ideal geometric calculation, and the fact that the string slightly stretches when it is fretted, because you are in fact executing a small bend. The intonation issue affect some strings more than others: those which more ...



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