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26

The spacing is designed to offer useful milestones on the fretboard. Take the notes on the 6th string (in standard tuning), for example: Open (0th fret) is E. The F is only 1 fret away, why put a marker on the 1st fret? It's already marked by being the first fret The G is on fret 3, so put a marker there. The A is on fret 5, which is a perfect 4th from ...


20

Maple boards are typically placed on Swamp Ash or brighter wood bodies and it lends a snap to the tone of the guitar. Rosewood is known to be much mellower, and usually makes it's way on mahogany bodies and necks. They definitely feel different too. A maple neck is harder and feels very smooth under your fingers, while rosewood has some sponginess to it due ...


13

When converting a fretted instrument to fret less you have a couple of options if you want to DIY: Modify the current fingerboard in some way. This includes purchasing a fret-puller like @ekaj suggests, pulling out all the fretwires, and filling in all the fret slots with wood putty. Unfortunately you will suffer from the issues that @Alex mentions in that ...


12

Maybe lost to history, the dots are references for the Fibonacci series, which when harmonics are considered, give a pure major chord with octave and perfect fifth redundancies. The dot at the 9th fret marks 2/5ths of the string length. The harmonic there is of the 5th partial (the major third) -- this is the one that throws you off. This is my ...


11

Welcome to the wonderful world of non-standard intonation. You will like it here. I have answered here on instruments where you have to dictate the intonation: slide and steel guitar and theremin. I haven't mentioned violin/fiddle, because by the time you're good enough for it to be worthwhile to ask questions in this sort of forum, you've already learned ...


10

There's some good related information on this question, so give that a read. A re-fret isn't always the best answer to a little fret buzz--sometimes a simple setup will fix it. Anything from simple truss rod adjustments, to new nut/saddle pieces could fix you up proper. However, if the problem has gradually evolved from a perfectly fine playing guitar then ...


10

"lower" strings are lower in pitch, the thick ones... Upper is higher. Lower frets are towards the nut, upper to the bridge. However, (and apparently in contradiction) we normally use "up" for say, bends where the strings are pushed towards the upper edge of the fretboard, and down for the opposite direction.. But only rarely is there a directional ...


9

If you have a string or strings that go out of tune more and more as you go up the fretboard, you don't have a string issue. You have an intonation issue. We have a wide range of questions here on intonation, but basically the length of the string from nut to bridge is the problem. The quick check you can do is to play this string while fretting the 12th ...


9

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


8

As luthier Chris Larkin explains for this 9 string bass monster - To get suitable tension on the huge variation of string sizes it required different scale lengths for each string and so needed fan frets.


7

I'm pretty sure you have to tune your bass to standard tuning. EADG so in order to play the notes in tune you'd have to put your finger on your left hand at the fret bar. If you wanted to play the notes at the center of the fret you would have to tune your bass accordingly, not a good idea IMO. On a standard bass even though you put your finger in between ...


7

Think of the reason you're giving names to notes: communication. So, it depends who you're communicating with, their expectations of you, and your expectations of them. When I play soprano ukulele, I think in terms of the guitar fretboard - the intervals between strings are the same as the top four strings of a guitar. So in my head, I play a guitar "D" ...


7

If it's an exceedingly low-quality product, it could just be that the fretboard is badly designed enough that the notes are just not in the right place, but realistically, all guitars exhibit tuning issues with fretted notes. Equal temperament is a compromise to begin with, and the guitar itself even more so. Assuming it's not actually a manufacturing ...


7

Looking online, opinion seems to be split about the merits of doing this, with some sources pointing out that you can simply buy a fretless neck for a reasonable price. But I certainly remember bass playing friends of mine removing the frets from basses, to convert to fretless, and I can understand why you would want to do this with a bass you don't ...


6

With great care. I wouldn't attempt this myself; but this looks like a good walk though of a scalloping procedure Fretboard Scolloping Just in addition to this, if I were you, I would consider buying a spare neck or two to experiment on; so as to leave your original neck intact until you are certain you have the technique correct. Here an example of a ...


6

The question of: "What are the benefits of guitars with fanned frets?" is a good question. The correct answer depends on what your intentions are. If all you ever want to do is strum chords to back up your singing voice or play along with others than you'll do just fine on your standard six string guitar. However ,,, if your ambitions run far beyond playing ...


6

WIth that fingering, have you tried plucking the 5th string on the nut side of your fretted point? You will find that the vibrating string between the nut and 7th fret gives the same note you are plucking on the 3rd string. Normally the nut side of each string will resonate a little if damped (which is why for tapping passages, many musicians use a nut ...


6

I don't have my guitar with me right now. but it's probably easier to fret the F# with either your thumb, or to use the 2nd finger on f#, either that or the following: -- -1- 1st -2- 4th -2- 3rd -- -2- 2nd Hope that helps :)


6

Not only would your fretted notes play flat, but as you go further up the fretboard, the flatter your notes will get!


6

Most players probably don't play full chords above 12th fret; however, you could try using fewer fingers, as in for an E shaped chord, using one finger on 5th and 4th strings, similarly on A shaped chords, play with 2 or 3 fingers - a barre over all 6, and a mini barre over 4,3 and 2. Just playing 3 or 4 notes out of particular chords works well, too, as ...


6

If you can learn to play without fret markers, you will have a tremendous advantage over those who have learned to rely on the fret markers. When I first began learning to play guitar I relied on the fret markers to help me find my place on the fretboard. But when I started playing for audiences on dark stages, I recognized the limitations of not being ...


6

I'd shy away from anything not prescribed. One can use olive or linen oil to great effect on untreated wooden tables or breakfast plates: it gets sucked up in unbelievable amounts and then partly cracks and thickens, preserving the wood and making it impervious to stains. However, olive oil is acidic which would be bad news for frets and strings. And most ...


5

The fret inlays (assuming they're vertical - those are the easiest to distinguish with) will tell you were the actual fret would be installed on the same neck. Since different types of guitars have different scale lengths, these are important to show you were the note sits on the fretboard. Technically it wouldn't matter what you tuned your bass to, as ...


5

Especially if everyone in your ensemble follows suit, you can think of this as playing with a different reference ptich frequency. Nowadays, most tuning uses a reference pitch of A'=440Hz. You can think of down-tuning your guitar as redefining this reference pitch to be a different, lower, frequency. For example, declaring A'=415Hz is the same as down ...


5

After 8 years you will not find any manufacturer guarantee, so getting a free repair for inlay damage is not going to happen. If you are not 100% confident, take it to a luthier, but this is actually a straightforward repair. Take off the strings. Carefully remove the inlay Remove the glue from underneath the inlay and from the slot it was in. You can ...



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