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3

Fret buzz is not only not necessarily bad, but actually a part of the guitar tone. The guitar is partially a percussive instrument, and one percussive aspect of that (in addition to knocking or tapping on the body of an acoustic guitar or hollow-body electric) is the snap produced by string-on-fret action. Slap guitar technique in particular exploits this ...


4

Fret buzz isn't necessarily a sign of a poor setup, because some players want low action and can accept some fret buzz. A guitar tech should discuss this with a player before doing a setup. Having strings fret out when bending is more serious and I would expect a tech to make sure this isn't happening, unless a player said they don't do string bending and ...


10

The lower the fret action, the more buzz you will get. Your ideal height will be based on what you need. Unamplified, many of the really fast guitarists have fret buzz all over the neck. Personally, I use a reasonably high action on most of my guitars (about 3mm at 12th fret) because I dislike buzz and have quite a hard picking action. I do have two guitars ...


2

The strings buzz quite consistently but not enough to be heard through an amp Strings buzzing not only puts you off playing but it will prevent the string from resonating for as long and lower your tone quality. In my opinion nobody should create fret buzz when you ask them to lower your action. One thing you could try is a higher gauge string, but that ...


1

Herokiller This can be caused by a couple of things. First off, you may just need to replace your strings. Probably a good idea to start fresh if you have to make any adjustments, and old strings are less reliably in tune. Next, have you properly set your guitar's intonation? Just google it: other people have explained it better than I would. Then, the ...


3

The reason is it's impossible for the intonation on a fretted instrument to be accurate across all strings and frets. Some notes will be off. Right next to the nut is actually a very challenging place for intonation because it's near the end of the strings where the real world behavior is farther from the calculated behavior, and adjusting intonation has the ...


1

Two things: one, this is nothing new. The orpharion- a kind of lute with metal strings in the Renaissance- had fanned frets. http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger2/1788/785959171655748/1600/barley_orpharion_lighter_800.jpg The other thing: yes, the idea is to get longer bass strings (or shorter treble strings). But if you look at the difference in length ...


0

You can try getting flat wound strings, which are much smoother than round wound strings. You should also try different gauges of string to see if you find one easier to play than another. Light gauge strings can be easier on your fingers since you don't have to press as hard.



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