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The key difference between a musical and an opera is that a musical contains spoken word. While a musical alternates singing with "regular" acting, an opera's story is completely conveyed through singing. Of course, an opera may have a few spoken lines here and there, and a musical may have a very high singing versus speaking ratio. You can already tell what ...


5

For practical purposes, the two words are mostly interchangeable. Style: sometimes people say "style" to refer more to the conventions of rhythm, harmony, melody, arrangement and production that might be associated with music of a particular type, from a particular area, or of a particular genre. Because of this you can hear people say things like, "I ...


5

These words are very dependent on the context, and in many cases, they can even be treated as synonyms. That's one reason why you see them being used interchangeably: in case there is no possible confusion, either word can be used. One way to look at it I am not completely sure if this is the correct way to look at it, but I've always seen it like this: ...


2

Andrew Lloyd Webber's musicals are significantly different from 'golden age' musicals of the 40's and 50's. You call such pieces is rock opera, but this is probably not the most accurate term as it more often refers to a musical album with connecting narrative through the songs (and no element of staging). Thus, I prefer (and will be using) the term ...



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