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10

The glissando symbol, by default, means a white-key gliss, regardless of key signature. There is a common piano technique by which you play a gliss with one hand and then strike the final note with the other. This has the added benefit of the final note being accented, which will also allow it to sustain more. Without any other contextual information being ...


9

Am I supposed to glissando on the white keys through A and then hit and hold the B flat at the end? I'm not a piano theory expert, but I would say yes. Performing the glissando across the white keys gives you a major scale (more or less); this is the "sound" I typically associate with a glissando in music. If you move across just the black keys, ...


8

Although the two terms are often conflated, and although there are plenty of situations where the difference isn't noticeable, the intended difference is that portamento is a relatively quick pitch slide between all or most of the notes during a melody or melody section. The pitch slide tends to come only at the very end of the note, more or less during the ...


4

An edition hosted on IMSLP here indicates that you should use 4-2 for the ascending glissandi, and 3-1 for the descending ones. I'm personally not a fan of the 3-1 fingering, because it's harder to rotate the hand so your nails impact the next key (Doing that makes glissandi hurt MUCH LESS on pianos with a stiff action). On the other hand, it does ...


3

Personally I choose to use my thumb nail (going down at least, sometimes a finger nail going up depending on what's easiest, but always the nail.) This hurts to start with, but before long you'll get used to it. The "down then up" Glissando in Rhapsody in Blue for instance I find easier with the thumb going down, and a finger on the way up - when it's just ...


2

FL studio's piano roll would let you create a portamento by using a "slide" note. It's been years since I've used the program, but I can't imagine that feature being taken out.


2

Irrespective of singing, a glissando indicates that specific notes (whether specified or not) should be played or performed. For example, if there is a perfect-fifth leap with a port. indication, the performer should play/sing all of the chromatic notes in between unless otherwise indicated. A portamento indicates that no specific pitches are necessary ...


2

If you play a glissando remember to relax your hand. A glissando should not cause any great pain. Even if you were playing in a large concert hall, it should not be the case that you hold your fingers so stiff that you have to make the glissando so loud for the audience. Loosen up and practice a glissando with just one finger even by just using your index ...


1

Glissando is a discrete portamento whereas portamento is a continuous glissando.


1

When using "Czardas" as an example for portamento identity, it's important to note that the interpretive portion of the piece is heavily rubato, disregarding time/tempo and leaving much to expression. A clear definition of portamento (as I perform it, attacking a note and sliding to another with no discernable voicings in between,and almost immediately ...


1

Glissando is going through intermediate pitches musically. Portamento "carries" one pitch to another pitch: there is no interruption in tone and style and no "musical concept" of intermediate notes even though the execution might not be able to switch pitches instantly. It's pretty much the same as a slur over a larger interval. If you map this to a ...


1

Given the recording, it seems clear that the gliss markings are intended to convey "portamento with vibrato" -- this seems like a reasonable way to notate it, especially if there were footnotes or similar indicating that this is the effect. To me, the notation of "de-ba-ta" looks good; the "ba" syllable is a pick-up note leading into the ta syllable. ...


1

You may use the nail, but fingertips also work for a (downward) louder glissando.



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