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4

Do you think B.B. King's guitar sound is anything like Stevie Ray Vaughan's? They're both labeled as "blues". Do you think Jimmy Page's guitar sound is anything like Brian May's? They're both labeled as "classic rock". Do you think Randy Rhoads's guitar sound is anything like Dimebag Darrell's? They're both labeled as "metal". Forget about comparing ...


1

Typically you already have mids prominent when you play through an amp as electric guitar amps respond more in the mid range than the low or high range. A lot of mids when you're using distortion will make the sound "muddy", which people like for some stuff. I use a BOSS GE-7 equalizer as a clean volume boost and also to shape my tone. I usually have it ...


2

The eq settings on the amp are usually close to the same on Rock and other styles. Metal can go to extremes by cutting mids. The mids usually are more in control of the overall tone. I usually have Bass - 7, Mid - 6, Treble -7 for Classic Rock and Blues. Play a chord and let it sustain while turning one knob up and down to hear the difference. If you were ...


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Quite frankly, I never understood equalizer presets. Your disks should have been mastered properly by a professional with the will of the artists or producer in mind. If they wanted you to hear more bass, they would have pumped the bass when mastering. Your equalizer, however, can be set according to your listening conditions: mainly the characteristics of ...


1

There is a multitude of effects that you can use to achieve this setting. The whammy really works and is very good for pitch shifting, and i know where you're coming from when you say it sounds muddy, It can sound muddy and even glitchy, which is actually a feature that a lot of people like. I dont know what is your style of play when using the whammy, but ...


0

I'm a Tele player, and I learned the trick from Danny Gatton's Hot Licks instructional tape, where he showed how to cut away some of the attack with volume swells, and also tone swells. He did this on a Tele with standard control plate setup. Simply, you wrap your pinky around the volume knob. (Jeff Beck uses a tone swell for the train horn lick at the ...


1

DI (Direct Injection) boxes Like an Amp Simulator these are not considered effects however they have significance to performing musicians (connecting to an in-house PA system or studio recording rig) so I'm giving them a mention. A DI box converts the guitar/effects output to a mic-lead connection. Besides the obvious difference in the shape of the ...


1

Ring Modulator Ring modulation takes two separate inputted signals and multiplies those signals. A ring modulator will typically take the input signal from an instrument and mix it with a second signal generated by an internal oscillator which you can vary the frequency of. Moderate frequencies generate eerie, bell-like tones that sound awesome beneath ...


0

Freeze pedal Sometimes also called a "granular synthesizer", this effect allows guitarists to infinitely sustain what they are currently playing on their guitars. Simple versions of this pedal are the Electro Harmonix "Freeze" pedal and the "Freeze" effect on the Boss ME-80 multi-effects pedal. A more sophisticated version is the Electro Harmonix ...


3

Another option would be to use an EBow (Electronic Bow). As it's names suggests, this device can be used to create bowing effects like a violin or cello.


3

Wah-wah (or just "wah") This is effectively a foot-operated parametric equialiser. A frequency is determined normally by the position of a foot pedal. The input signal is boosted at, and around, this frequency, above the rest of the signal. As you move the pedal, the frequency being amplified changes up or down. The frequency range is set so that it sits ...


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One technique that hasn't been mentioned is acoustic feedback. It's probably less tricky with double-coil pickups which are less prone to magnetic feedback bypassing the strings altogether.


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One way to get this effect is with an envelope filter. Then you will get it automatically, as the volume starts at 0 when the string is plucked, and then increases (with the correct settings).


10

Often called violining, either use the swell (volume) pedal or the volume pot on your guitar. Strat style guitars are pretty good for this, as Leo thought to put the volume control quite close to the strings/bridge, so a little finger can roll from palm to tip as you pluck the string. Then it gets rolled off again the opposite way, ready for the next note. ...


1

I use an MXR ten band EQ in the loop of my Mesa Rectifier, to boost the mids (which are quite scooped on this amp type). For me it is a necessary thing to be able to get a sound I like from that amp. So it can be very important. I think it is important to try to get the most out of your equipment you have now first, and then add effects as limits are ...


0

An EQ is more important than a lot of musicians realise, especially for guitar. Most musicians like to leave their overall sound in the mix to the soundman. However, if you really like a certain tone, having an EQ beside your rig will give you more flexibility to get that tone. As you do your sound check and play with the band you need to move out and ...


2

Any solution you choose is going to cost a significant amount of money, such as in buying a new instrument. There are many models and brands of pitch-shifter effects pedals and rack-mount multi-effects devices that can transpose everything you play down a half-step, whole-step or further, but they all sound artificial, especially if you are playing chords. ...


2

Have a look at this video: Apparently he installed 4 drop-tuners, I had never seen it before but it does provide a cool effect and a quick dropped tuning. It is not as versatile as a ...


2

There doesn't appear to be a bass version, but Hipshot make a "Trilogy" bridge that allows you to pick one of three tunings for each string individually. Alternatively, you could just use a capo - down-tune the guitar a whole step then use the capo to bring it back up.


4

Pitch shift pedals usually do not give a natural detuned sound. There are pedals dedicated for getting a natural detuned sound, like the Digitech Whammy DT or Morpheus DropTune. I haven't used one, so I can't back up their claims.


3

I hope this may sort of answer your question. Faced with the same sort of problem, on bass, a 5 string came to the rescue. It had a low B, thus could play a fourth lower than standard. It covered most of the lower notes that would be needed.A guy I work with sometimes uses an 8 string bass - this goes down to a low F# - nearly an octave lower than standard. ...


5

Tronical. You can buy one directly from the Tronical company to install on your existing guitar, or you can buy certain models of Epiphone and Gibson guitars with a Tronical tuner already installed. Gibson and Epiphone market them under the trade-name "Min-ETune".



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