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1

This is my set-up when I go live with my post rock band. Since I don't have the money to get the all exclusive strymon pedals, I try creating sounds similar to hammock or Caspian with the pedals I have and it has been helping so far. The chain in which my pedals are, are as follows, TC Electronic Polytune 2 ( tuner ) Xotic Effects SP Compressor ISP ...


1

You don't need both the NS-2 and the Decimator, pick one. I like the NS-2 for high gain stuff. The ISP Decimator is not really a true gate so I might just ditch it. Your chain should be something like: NS-2 > compressor > chorus/phaser > delay. This is into the front of the amp. Loops are too finicky for my tastes, but you could go NS-2 to amp input, then ...


2

Different amplifier or pedal input stages may have different characteristics. The sound of a guitar will be affected in some measure by the characteristics of the device to which it is connected. To use a mechanical analogy, consider the relationship between the strings and the sounding board on an acoustic guitar. The strings try to move the sounding ...


0

One approach to achieving a guitar-plus-bass effect would be to use two strings of the guitar for bass notes, and the other four for "guitar" notes. One may then adjust the balance of how each pickup detects each string by adding pieces of steel. This can be especially effective with a humbucker pickup: placing a piece of steel between the two humbucker ...


1

One use for the bypass is when recording. The pedal then acts as a split box, the output is sent to e.g. an amp, while the bypassed signal could be sent to e.g. a re-amp box, which allows recording of the "clean" signal. This allows the track to be recorded again, with a different amp, the same amp on a different setting, sent to modelling software, ...


5

This has become a particularly heated area of debate recently on the internet, but personally I think a lot of it is blown way out of proportion. Basically, a lot of older effects pedals (and most current Boss ones) were always "buffered" or non-true bypass. What this means is that even when the effect pedal is off, your guitar's signal is still going ...


8

TL;DR Which is better? That's up to your ears. Both bypasses have trade-offs: True Bypass is the most pure and high-fidelity, but it exposes your signal to long-cable degradation (plus it's more expensive). Pedals with buffered bypass will color your tone (especially if you have many of them), but you can run long cables without worry. More explanation ...


5

The bypass jack bypasses the switch on the pedal so you when you engage the tuner you don't cut the signal. In a live situation you are usually going to want to be silent when you tune, so you should use the regular output to your amp/effects. Only use bypass if you want the signal to be heard even when you are tuning. This might be useful at home so you can ...



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