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0

Anything can be modded to almost anything. You can look at the most common mods at a number of different dealer's website (Analogman, Keeley etc.). The difference depends entirely on the mod being employed. Some change just a couple of values to alter the frequency response, some change a lot more components to make up a different stomp altogether.


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This is not all about gear. Your guitar sound also depends a lot on your playing style. You want to have an agressive, metal sound: start practicing and get a flawless agressive picking technique before spending hundreds of dollars in gear!


5

I have a somewhat unique approach to playing bass, much more aggressive lines and sometimes play what would be considered a lead line if a guitar was playing it (or other lead instrument). With that said, my current setup is as follows: Tuner pedal- Obviously used for tuning but can be very helpful to act as a mute. This is especially helpful if you need ...


5

Besides the looper, overdrive and wah-wah/envelope-filter pedals mentioned in other answers, I like: Bass chorus: Chorus smooths out the growl of wound strings. I like the growl generally but it's good to vary the sound. Phaser: Phasing the bass is very effective way of getting a great tone for certain rock, funk and jazz tunes. Here's an article that ...


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This is really up to what you want to do. I think I first started out with a fuzz pedal, but I don't use it so much. A lot of bassists use a wah wah pedal. I have one myself and it is pretty fun. If you like this kind of sound, you can also try out an envelope filter. It is pretty nice as well. I also use a octaver from time to time, but only on certain ...


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In general people use the effects loop to insert certain effects after the preamp stage but before the power amp stage in their amplifier. The preamp stage is where the EQ is applied and this stage colors the sound the most. The preamp is also where you get some of the overdrive when you turn up the gain. The power amp is usually more transparent and ...


7

a tuner First off, I'd put a tuner; but this isn't really an effects pedal and you can get the same functionality in non-pedal form. a compressor : A compressor is probably the most used effects for bassists, by suitably tuning the controls you can make the attack and release of the notes more sharp providing a stronger, some might say punchier, rhythmic ...


1

Hexaphonic MIDI pickups like the Roland GK-3 send a separate signal for each pickup to the 13-pin output jack and, although many processing units will only model a few signal paths (e.g. separating top three and bottom three is pretty common), there are ways to split out each string separately. For example, see separate-strings.co.uk, which is dedicated to ...


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I'd not bother. Bowing creates a special waveform that is quite different from that of a guitar, being more like a sawtooth (because it basically results from a stick and slide pattern on the bow hair: the violin is built to suck off and transmit much more sound energy than a guitar, so plucked notes don't have significant sustain). That's actually not ...


5

If you can play the parts on the unwound high E string, you can use a fiddle bow, as Jimmy Page did. Just remember to rosin the bow and use a cheap one as the guitar strings are hard on the horsehair. Another alternative is the Electro Harmonix SuperEgo which will allow you to adjust the attack (Gliss) as well as the sustain ("Speed"); Yet another ...


3

With e.g. a Roland GR-55 guitar synth and special pickup GK-3 you can get semi-convincing violin and cello sounds. Using midi you can connect to a e.g. a DAW and likely get vastly superior results through sound libraries. Not the cheapest solution, but probably closest to the real thing. Could be considered cheating though...


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very simple answer... E-Bow I've had one for 30 years, there's nothing quite like it, but it is a technique in & of itself. You can do the standard 'never-ending note' by simply holding it over a string & sliding/hammering up & down the fretboard, but with a little practise you can make it sound like violin/cello spiccato by banging the string ...


7

The important part of a violin sound is a gentle attack at the start of each note. Some players use a volume or swell pedal to achieve this: the note is played just as the pedal swells the volume in. Others use the volume pot on the guitar. Strats and Teles are quite easy to do this on, as the knob is close to where the string is picked. Again, the string is ...


3

To me it has mainly to do with the amount of gain. One other important factor is midrange. The sound of Satisfaction is comparably low in gain, and has some nice bite in the mids. If you compare to e.g. Santana, who could be considered to have a creamy solo sound, he has quite a lot of gain, and not so much midrange. Playing on the neck pickup will produce ...



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