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5

Some, if not all of the pedals, will be sucking power even when they're not turned on, but merely plugged in with the guitar. Your best bet is to sum up the milliamps (1/1000 of an amp) and get a psu that covers this figure. You may want to consider the future, when you have extra pedals, too. Going over with the current is not a problem - voltages and ...


1

You mentioned QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE, FOO FIGHTERS, VAN HALEN. Well all I can do is give you my perspective based upon your question. We all want to sound either 'like' our guitar heroes or at least reach the 'standard' and sound as 'good' as our idols. Nothing wrong with that at all it means you know where you intend to aim, good call. What I want to ...


1

The critical parts of the guitar for sustain and tone are all between the nut and the bridge, so if you add any shaped pieces on anywhere else they will not make audible differences. On the very high end guitars, the "horns" and other bits are designed to resonate at specific frequencies so they will have an effect on sound, but for most guitars any effect ...


1

That is most likely an Analog Tape Delay or tape delay simulator pedal. These were very popular. Pink Floyd used it a lot and Jimi Page liked to use it live during Dazed and Confused while playing with the bow. I think the Echoplex Ep3 was the one used circa 1970. Some had multiple tape loops to really go crazy. Jimi Page (@ 1around 11:00) ...


0

I'll leave the question unanswered for awhile to see if there are any other suggestions. I like the idea of a Transient Processor but I don't have one of those and they may be more expensive than a C9. In the meantime, I'll: split the guitar signal before the SuperEgo run one line into the SuperEgo run the other line into a Boss GE-3 amp pedal with the ...


1

There is a type of compressor called a "Transient processor" that can drop or accentuate any sudden changes in velocity, most commonly drum hits. If you can find a guitar pedal one then you can add this to your live guitar sound and adjust it to only let through the "transients" which will be a click. Then mix it in with your synthesized sound.


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It's not straightforward to process a guitar sound into a click with traditional effects - so the click sound would probably have to be triggered separately. One way to do this live would be to split your signal before you go into the superego and route one branch of your signal into a guitar-to-MIDI converter (something like a Sonuus G2M, which is ...


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You are using a synthesiser to generate your sound, so if the synthesiser doesn't have the feature you like then there isn't a lot you can do. The C9 you mention does provide it so your best bet is to get one of them. You may be able to get a part exchange on your current synth, or possibly sell it and make a profit.


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Nile Rodgers, of Chic fame, is largely responsible for the disco guitar style, that he adapted from the funk and ryhtm&blues styles that he learned playing with the Apollo theatre house band, Parliament Funkadelic, etc. This can be heard for example in Chic's eponymous first album from 1977: However the more typical ...


0

I am fairly uninformed on this stuff but will explain what I can. From my understanding, a phaser takes your guitars signal (I will call it a guitar track for simplicity's sake) and adds another which is identical or its "twin" and intertwines them so your going from mainly the delayed signal to equally the delayed and undeclared signal. For example (I'm ...


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Looking at the schematic (which can be found here or here) it appears your first assumption is correct. The OS-2 works by splitting the signal into two diffent paths, each with its own way of "clipping". These paths are then combined in a simple mixer and put through an active filter (tone control).


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By all accounts the OS-2 incorporates two different distortion circuits, and the 'color' knob allows you to adjust the mix between them. If you need more information on circuits, freestompboxes and diystompboxes are good places to look - e.g. http://www.diystompboxes.com/smfforum/index.php?topic=92158.0 talks about the blend in the OS-2.


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I have a hard time assigning any meaning to your question. A stompbox gets an electronic signal in, manipulates it using electronic circuits, and puts an electronic signal out. In that context, what does it even mean to "just emulate" an effect? My guess is that the control knob manipulates the behavior/parameters of a single signal path rather than have ...


1

All answers here forgot about one quite important thing. Power consumption. The analog effect takes from 10mA to 50mA on the other hand digital ones take from 50mA and highter (most TC Electronic requires above 100mA, Joyo Delay is 70mA). This kills battery quite fast (if you are John5) or requires stronger power supplies.


1

The answer will really depend on what you think a crappy guitar sound is. I've never used your particular effects unit but I have used plenty of others like it, so perhaps the following will help... Usually what I do in any given situation is to remove as much as possible from the signal chain to make sure that the clean and un-effected sound of any ...



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