New answers tagged

1

You can definitely use these for live shows. I have seen people use them very successfully at small gigs and festival shows. Yes, you aren't going to manage a quick patch change mid song, so if you need to do something like that you may need to add another pedal, but for many songs that isn't an issue (and you can use the guitar's volume control for boost ...


1

I'm pretty sure there's a belt clip available for it so that you can attach it to your strap. You might want to reinforce how it's attached with some duct tape (if it feels at all like it could fall off) or even just just tape it without the clip. Another option may be to attach it to a mic stand either with proper fixtures or my fave duct again. Do try this ...


0

The closest I've come to the Rooster clean tone is with using a CE-1 Anolog Chorus from my POD HD500, a EHX Deluxe Electric Mistress Flanger, and a dual amp setup with one of the amps being a Yamaha RA-200 rotating speaker. The chorus and flanger are blended on two paths of my signal (lets call them 'A' & 'B') Then those two signals run through a VOX ...


2

There must be something wrong with the pedal. The indication 'true bypass' means that when the pedal is connected with the guitar and amp and is turned off, the signal will pass directly to the amp. With a true bypass pedal, when the pedal is in bypass mode (off), the guitar signal is routed directly to the guitar amplifier without any of the ...


0

Turn the amp really loud. Even though solid state amps should not be aware of loudness this one required running at least 75% of power to play. Some people call it breathing level of an amp. Even though I did not get best distortion in the world it was distortion not terrible buzz. I still prefer topo morto's solution but this is important to test fully ...


5

The most common way guitarist chain their effects together is in series. This means that the original output source (the guitar) is plugged in to the input of the first effects pedal and the output from that pedal is plugged into the input of the next one and so on. The last pedal's output is plugged in to your amplifier. This is often called an effects "...


2

Yes, it's a common problem - you want to get your distortion from your amp, but you want to apply delay and reverb (or looping) to that distorted sound, rather than having reverb and delay that is itself distorted. One solution is to get an amp with an effects loop of course, but even then people often find that some pedals don't work well in loops that can ...


3

If it sounds good, it is good. If the effect is well made, there will be analog filters prior to the input A/D converters. These analog filters will suppress frequencies everything above about 15.5kHz (1/2 the sampling rate) before the signal gets digitized. This will have the effect of cutting off the highs in the processed signal, but shouldn't be a ...


5

All other things being equal, higher sampling rates are generally seen as better as they allow higher frequencies to be reconstructed when the signal is converted back to analogue. Simplistically speaking, the highest frequency that can be reconstructed is half the sampling rate. This is why 44.1 KHz is a frequently-used sampling rate - it allows ...


0

To answer this question, you (and we) need to know: What kinds of sounds are you trying to achieve? How you're trying to achieve them - do you want to get your basic sound from your amp? Or do you want to get your basic sound from your pedals, with your amp set clean? Do you even need an amp at all? What problem with your current gear prevents you from ...


1

It would appear that you've answered your own question! If your amp sucks, as you say, then it needs upgrading. Then listen to your pedals through the newer, better quality amp., and think whether you need to upgrade those too.


0

Analog Keyboard Simulator Distinct from MIDI synthesizers, these pedals combine a number of effects in one box to simulate keyboards such as organs, melotrons and electric pianos. ElectroHarmonix has pioneered this type of pedal with models such as the B9 Hammond Organ simulator.


0

MIDI Guitar Synthesizer These are synthesizers that combine with special guitar pickups to allow the guitarist to trigger a huge variety of synthesized sounds, basically any musical sound you can sample and synthesize. Examples of this include the Roland Guitar Synthesizer.


3

My opinion? I don't think the difference in sound he noticed has much to do with magnetic interactions between the pickup and the metal pick. He used a metal pick instead of a plastic one, simple as that. (Try using different picks on an acoustic guitar, or an electric with only piezo pickups, if you don't believe me.) Changing your pick or just your ...


1

Isn't this what an E-bow does? Get one of those and go wild with it...


6

A Boss PSA-style PSU should work fine. https://www.jhspedals.com/faqs/ says: All of our pedals use a standard 9v DC adapter with a negative ground Well, 9v DC, centre negative is the Boss-style PSU spec, the only one that in the pedal world that can be called 'standard'... but what about that 'with a negative ground' bit? I stand to be corrected, but ...


2

Boss power supplies are 9vdc, but the polarity is centre pin negative. There's a 50:50 chance. Doing a bit of homework reveals that JHS pedals use 9vdc negative ground. So, no, it's the wrong 50%. Unless you rewire the adaptor, or make a male/female dc lead that's wired back to front.Best buy the appropriate psu. The other factor of course is the power ...



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