Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

I'm not sure this is an answer, so much as a list of things to consider… Simple rule - more gain, more buzz. Guitar pickups are, by their very nature, susceptible to all kinds of interference - hum from fluorescent tubes, old-style CRT TVs etc & to a lesser degree, even assuming everything is properly earthed, the mains circuit itself. Any fluctuation ...


3

There are hinges that are 'open'. They act like hinges until at 90 degrees, then split. Or - use a small version of the hasp and staple used on gates. They are available for small cupboards, and once open, the lid can slide sideways and come off the pins.Rather like 'rising butt' hinges found on some doors. A really cheap and cheerful solution is to use a ...


2

Set it up so that the lid can be used as a base for the pedal board while you're playing. You'll need to ensure a couple of things: that the lid is strong enough to handle "missteps"; and that the lid doesn't slip in either position (i.e., the lid holds its place against the frame of the pedal board through some sort of joint - maybe a lip). If you do ...


4

The standard way to do this is without hinges anyway. Build it using the catches you usually see on flight cases. I'll post up a couple of pictures later to show you what I mean.


3

Conventional wisdom is to put timing effects like delay and reverb absolutely last in your effects chain. If you use an effects loop, they would usually go in the loop after the pre-amp stage and all other effects, so it makes sense to put your delay pedal after the modeler. Most guitarists do it that way to avoid exactly the kind of muddiness you are ...


1

If one imagined the signal of an electric guitar as representing mechanical motion, there would be two ways to characterize its output: How far it moves (analogous to voltage) How much force it pushes with (analogous to current) Typically, the output of an electric guitar is analogous to a mechanical signaling device which applies a very small amount of ...


7

There's a good article on this in ScreamInFX. To summarise the key points: Simply put, a buffer is a circuit that will exactly replicate what is connected to the input to the output and more importantly, be able to apply that output with no changes (be transparent) to the next guitar pedal in the line. ... So why would you want that, sounds ...



Top 50 recent answers are included