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12

Birdseye maple is a cut of wood from one of several types of hard maple, most commonly Acer Saccharum. The only real difference between birdseye and regular hard maple is the figure, which doesn't really do anything to the tone of the wood. It's still as bright as any other type of maple. Scientists really have no clue as to why the figure occurs, but we ...


12

The main advantage of neck-through construction is better sustain, achieved through greater stiffness. It's all about maintaining the string's energy as long as possible. Why does a guitar string lose its sustain? Why doesn't it keep vibrating forever? When you pluck a string, you impart energy to the string, and that energy keeps it vibrating. But some ...


12

For styles of music that predominantly depend upon playing solos and melodies with a pick, guitarist prefer guitars with narrow necks. For styles of music that predominantly depend on strumming chords with a pick, and using lots of barré chords, guitarists prefer instruments with necks of intermediate width. For styles of music that involve intricate ...


12

There are several reasons why electric guitars have thinner necks than acoustic guitars. Part of it is just convention, primarily relating to the styles of music for which a guitar is designed. Classical guitar playing requires a wider string spacing to facilitate easy access to each string. Even within steel-string acoustic guitars, there is considerable ...


7

The simple answer is no. There is nothing that will be damaged if you take the neck off for a while. I have various guitars that live in this state between necks and the only thing that I need to do is sort the truss rod whenever I a set up a new neck, but that needs to be done with any new neck.


4

The answer to this is probably going to depend on the individual. I'm inclined to say it shouldn't be a problem except that you say it will be your main practice guitar. I'm not sure what other guitars you'll be playing and for what purpose, but in my experience, it's best to practice on the guitar you will be playing in other (non-practice) situations. ...


3

If it's a high-quality guitar, and it's the one you're going to be performing with, who cares about its size? If it feels right to you and makes you a better performer, perhaps the rest of us are all in the wrong! Don't however, think that people with small hands can't play big guitars. I have taught many young and adult students with tiny hands to play ...


3

I sought advice on this site last year, before buying a short-scale bass guitar: What are the disadvantages of buying a short-scale bass guitar I've found the short-scale bass a wonderful instrument to practice, learn and perform on. One of my concerns was that if I was handed a full-scale bass, my skills wouldn't transfer. I've found that it's fine. I ...


2

Many factors can affect how a neck feels, and personal preference can be a big decider here. What type of music are you looking to play? People who like playing fast tend to prefer thin necks (measuring from fretboard to the back of the neck), a flat profile on the fretboard, and possibly a wide neck (from one edge of the fretboard to another) to allow for ...


2

Many of us could list the characteristics of a good neck. However, it would remain possible for a vendor to list all those characteristics, without lying, and still supply a dud neck. Imagine, you buy a neck with the exact measurements you want, maple of exactly the density you wanted, and so on -- and when it comes the frets are uneven. You should go by ...


2

I built guitars and basses in the 80's and 90's and have been playing for well over 30 years. I've tended towards shorter scale guitars (Gibson) and actually think nothing is wrong with playing even 7/8 and possibly 3/4. If you enjoy the guitar, it is easier to play and it sounds good by all means go for it. Too often someone says, "Don't do that." Jeff ...


1

Actually in this day and age, electric guitar neck width is due to music genres and techniques that serve them, markets, personal preferences by star players and company design decisions based on all of that. Your list really accents playing style trends and I agree that was the changing point for differences in various neck designs. Case in point, some of ...


1

It is also worth noting that there is some variance in approaches to neck design among the different brands of electric guitars. For instance you Ibanez and ESP guitars will generally have the slimmest, fastest neck. For players who put a premium on playing fast these neck designs are great. If you want to play Brian Setzer type of folk music then a ...


1

Get a guitar that fits, has good action and intonation, then play it. Use it at recital and gig with it. Anyone who plays a regular guitar and a bass transitions scale lengths. Anyone who plays a Gibson and a Fender transitions scale lengths. Professionals play short scales frequently. Check out Sting's Christmas special on the net. That little guitar ...


1

The name "maple" for wood is very ambiguous (there are many subspecies and also other species sold under this name). If one stays with the "commercial" names, on an aesthetic level there is plain maple, flamed maple, quilted maple and birdseye maple. It can have really complex figures that reveal themselves fully after varnish. The effect and shapes are ...



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