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23

I'm going to post the dissenting answer here in that I feel like you don't want to look for a different kind of guitar or a perfect strap height. Most of my time in bands has been with at least one female guitarist or guitarist/bassist in the band, and in one band that I was in for a few years I was the only man. I also am a big fan of several bands feature ...


14

There are several reasons why electric guitars have thinner necks than acoustic guitars. Part of it is just convention, primarily relating to the styles of music for which a guitar is designed. Classical guitar playing requires a wider string spacing to facilitate easy access to each string. Even within steel-string acoustic guitars, there is considerable ...


12

Birdseye maple is a cut of wood from one of several types of hard maple, most commonly Acer Saccharum. The only real difference between birdseye and regular hard maple is the figure, which doesn't really do anything to the tone of the wood. It's still as bright as any other type of maple. Scientists really have no clue as to why the figure occurs, but we ...


12

The main advantage of neck-through construction is better sustain, achieved through greater stiffness. It's all about maintaining the string's energy as long as possible. Why does a guitar string lose its sustain? Why doesn't it keep vibrating forever? When you pluck a string, you impart energy to the string, and that energy keeps it vibrating. But some ...


7

The simple answer is no. There is nothing that will be damaged if you take the neck off for a while. I have various guitars that live in this state between necks and the only thing that I need to do is sort the truss rod whenever I a set up a new neck, but that needs to be done with any new neck.


7

A number of years back, I found a solution which helped me position my guitar exactly where I wanted when I was standing up. The answer is a string running from the strap button, across the top of the lower bout of the guitar, to the strap at the other side near your shoulder. This lets you angle the guitar neck however you want, adjust the guitar balance ...


6

Not only would your fretted notes play flat, but as you go further up the fretboard, the flatter your notes will get!


5

I sought advice on this site last year, before buying a short-scale bass guitar: What are the disadvantages of buying a short-scale bass guitar I've found the short-scale bass a wonderful instrument to practice, learn and perform on. One of my concerns was that if I was handed a full-scale bass, my skills wouldn't transfer. I've found that it's fine. I ...


5

The answer to this is probably going to depend on the individual. I'm inclined to say it shouldn't be a problem except that you say it will be your main practice guitar. I'm not sure what other guitars you'll be playing and for what purpose, but in my experience, it's best to practice on the guitar you will be playing in other (non-practice) situations. ...


4

All the notes would play flat (lower in pitch). The 12th fret (for example) should normally be halfway along the string, so that it sounds an octave higher than the open string. If the bridge saddle is further from the 12th fret than the nut is, the 12th fret would play a pitch lower than the octave above the open string.


3

Most fret buzzing is a result of the vibrating string contacting another fret as it vibrates in an oscillating arc. There are several things that commonly cause this to happen. Neck does not have enough relief or has a back bow. The vibrating/oscillating string must clear all the frets between where it is fretted and the bridge. If the neck is ...


3

For a reference, you could look up for guitar players who may have a similar body type as yours, and try to figure out how they are getting comfortable at what they are doing. Playing while standing up will always feel different than sitting down, so with time most players figure it out automatically. Just make sure your strap feels comfortable to you. A ...


3

If it's a high-quality guitar, and it's the one you're going to be performing with, who cares about its size? If it feels right to you and makes you a better performer, perhaps the rest of us are all in the wrong! Don't however, think that people with small hands can't play big guitars. I have taught many young and adult students with tiny hands to play ...


3

Truss rod adjustments do not usually affect the neck with an immediate change. Depending on the base wood, it could take 30 minutes to an hour before the truss rod has had it's full effect on the neck. My recommendation would be to wait 30 minutes to an hour and check again. If you feel you have made the proper adjustments, but your guitar neck is skill ...


3

Many factors can affect how a neck feels, and personal preference can be a big decider here. What type of music are you looking to play? People who like playing fast tend to prefer thin necks (measuring from fretboard to the back of the neck), a flat profile on the fretboard, and possibly a wide neck (from one edge of the fretboard to another) to allow for ...


3

Short answer: Yes, but... The first guitar I bought was a Peavey Predator, a bottom-of-the-line, budget Strat clone. Several years later I came across a good deal on Fender Custom Shop Strat pickups, so I got them to put in the Predator. Yes, it did improve the sound a lot, but like your guitar the frets were very worn, the tuning machines were terrible, ...


2

Many of us could list the characteristics of a good neck. However, it would remain possible for a vendor to list all those characteristics, without lying, and still supply a dud neck. Imagine, you buy a neck with the exact measurements you want, maple of exactly the density you wanted, and so on -- and when it comes the frets are uneven. You should go by ...


2

Get a guitar that fits, has good action and intonation, then play it. Use it at recital and gig with it. Anyone who plays a regular guitar and a bass transitions scale lengths. Anyone who plays a Gibson and a Fender transitions scale lengths. Professionals play short scales frequently. Check out Sting's Christmas special on the net. That little guitar ...


2

I built guitars and basses in the 80's and 90's and have been playing for well over 30 years. I've tended towards shorter scale guitars (Gibson) and actually think nothing is wrong with playing even 7/8 and possibly 3/4. If you enjoy the guitar, it is easier to play and it sounds good by all means go for it. Too often someone says, "Don't do that." Jeff ...


2

First of all, I think you're making a mistake in your question. You probably meant you have a rosewood FINGERBOARD on maple neck and now you want a maple neck with also maple fingerboard. I would say, if you want to replace it because of tone, forget it. Instead, change the material of the nut, type of strings, pickups, bridge sustain block (where the ...


2

Since you stretch your strings and would prefer not to have your guitar worked on at a shop, a quick fix would be a lubricant. Before the Floyd Rose tremolo system existed, lots of players would apply lubricants to the nuts of their guitars as needed. This allows the strings to slide through the nut when bent or when used heavily by a whammy bar. Van Halen ...


2

Here's my guess, since there seems to be no answer anywhere online. Martin Guitars has been around since 1833. They sell various nut widths up to 1 7/8. I am a hat maker. Virtually everyone used to wear a hat. You could get the same hat in various oval shapes to match your head shape, round, round oval, medium oval, medium long oval, long oval, extra long ...


2

I think that probably you just have a too big guitar. Some steel strings come with absolutely huge bodies that are in many ways very unpractical. Something like a Taylor GS Mini or even a Baby Taylor could work better for you. I would especially not advice you to play a dreadnought body as they are very thick at the neck. A shape that has most of the girth ...


2

The fret spacing (distance of each fret from the saddle) is very precise for any given scale length. Many guitar manufacturers stick with common scale lengths so they don't have to constantly re-calculate the fret spacing. But the scale length varies between guitar builders and some even offer options for different scale lengths. Moving the bridge even ...


2

First port of call - Paul Reed Smith. He may well have seen the problem before. It makes life easier to slacken the strings before tightening the truss rod.While they're loose, try to turn another turn, you'll feel if it's binding or the thread has gone, more easily.


2

If you're getting buzz only at certain frets and on certain strings then the problem is probably that your frets aren't level. This can happen because of fret wear, because the frets weren't properly leveled when the guitar was made, or because the neck has changed shape slightly over time. You can diagnose the problem by using a short straightedge that ...


2

I have no gender-specific advice, but this is what I do to get a guitar into a good position while standing: While in a good sitting position, I adjust my strap until I can stand without the guitar moving significantly. You may need to experiment with different kinds of straps. Tied to the headstock or using a second strap button will be different. Maybe a ...



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