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12

Back in the 60s, unless there was an instrument that couldn't easily be re-tuned, i.e. piano, organ, etc, featuring in the set, all guitars were tuned to each other, probably using the first one that was in tune. It wasn't that important, as long as everyone was at the same pitch. Occasionally a piano was used, and the band would have to tune to whatever ...


8

There are two components involved here. One is indeed ear training, and the other one is knowing your instrument well, i.e. being able to produce any melody as effortlessly as you do with your voice. And for this second part, you do not need to consciously know the intervals as long as you intuitively find the right notes on your instrument. But anyway, ...


7

It is unlikely to make a bit of difference. Note there some, notably Keith Richards, who consistently play with one string removed. (OK so it's not the same string.) Don't worry. The biggest worry would be if you have a movable bridge, with greatly reduced tension on most of the strings, the bridge of such a guitar could move. Secondly if you try to twist ...


6

Although it seems straight forward and simple, this is actually a tricky question. The tuning you describe is simply standard tuning - except one whole step flat. Everything Bob Broadley said in his answer is theoretically correct with one minor glitch (for G to F) created by the harmonica makers. In the example you used for your guitar tuning, if you ...


4

There are a number of ways to play a G chord in what I call first position (using some open strings). The easiest possible way to play it is to fret the high e (first) string on the third fret with a finger of your choice and play the four strings closest to the floor (the four skinniest strings 1-4). Here are the charts for 5 ways to play a G chord in ...


4

I understand where you are coming from. I used to have the same problem. To overcome this takes a concerted effort and dedicated practice. You must develop muscle memory so that you can put your brain and fretting hand on auto pilot. To internalize the movements needed to play a song, take one part at a time. Play it over and over while looking at the ...


4

Standard tuning on the guitar is E A D G B E, from the lowest/thickest string (6) to the highest/thinnest (1). Therefore, tuning the guitar strings down to D G C F A D, from lowest to highest, will make them each exactly a whole-tone lower (the same as two semitones, or two frets, if you like). Therefore, playing the music on your detuned guitar, in the ...


4

I would call what you want to do - playing melodies by ear. It's easier to do on piano because of the logical way the keyboard is laid out. Ascending one key is always a semitone higher, descending lower. Piano was the first instrument I learned to play and I quickly developed the ability to play any melody by ear on the piano. With guitar, it took ten ...


4

I certainly wouldn't throw this away; if I didn't want to keep it as a curiosity piece, I would try to sell it. It may not be a great musical instrument, but it's suitable for a museum or a collector of Soviet memorabilia. I would expect to find: It is playable, but doesn't sound or feel great. Nobody would buy it for musical reasons Someone would want to ...


3

Yes, in the old days all three strat pickups would have been the same, wound on a simple machine. As tastes progressed it became fairly common to buy an add on bridge pickup with more windings, for a higher level and "heavier" tone, or even a humbucker - but the neck and middle tend not to be different in construction. However there's one thing in your ...


3

It doesn't quite work like that. The guitar doesn't exactly have a single key that its "in". Instead it has chords that are easier and more difficult to play. Some relatively easy ones (sticking with just major chords) include C, G, D, A, and E, which allows you to play in quite a few different keys. If you were playing in the key of D, you'd likely see a ...


3

I've been using regular minor thirds ("diminished") tuning for 20 years. As best I can tell, this was also Django Rheinhardt's secret trick. Some early delta blues players used it as well. The tuning lacks a bit of range, and I make up for this by making the highest interval (2nd to 1st string) increase by a perfect fifth (7 frets) instead of minor 3rd. ...


3

You are missing the tuners. I can not speak to the value of the guitar but it is not playable until at least that is replaced. It is unclear from the picture whether the tuners were friction or gear. I am betting on friction. If they were friction some slight adaption may be desired to fit modern gear tuners on the instrument. At the same time, if the ...


2

Here's my guess, since there seems to be no answer anywhere online. Martin Guitars has been around since 1833. They sell various nut widths up to 1 7/8. I am a hat maker. Virtually everyone used to wear a hat. You could get the same hat in various oval shapes to match your head shape, round, round oval, medium oval, medium long oval, long oval, extra long ...


2

From my experience as a guitar teacher there are some people who (with some practice) are able to play that chord, and some simply aren't. You're dependent on the size of your hand and especially of the flexibility of your third finger. People who can flex their third finger in the "wrong" direction will find it easier to play that chord. Also your pinky ...


2

All full-featured notation programs available these days can "transcribe" from MIDI input (and even GarageBand has a notation mode). But these are always prone to errors, since your rhythmic inputs are non-mechanical timings, for which the program needs to guess what rhythm you meant. So really, this functionality is provided mostly as an input shortcut for ...


2

With the guitar being a positional instrument, meaning one can play the same tune in many different keys but retain the same fingering and strings, merely moving where on the neck the tune is played, then knowing note names as the tune unfolds is not necessary. The relationship between the tonic and other notes, as far as where they are relatively speaking, ...


2

One thing you can do that will help you assess the trouble, is to take a sharpie marker, and play each string one at a time. If the string buzzes in a particular fret on a spot, mark the top of the fret with the sharpie. So do this for each string at each fret position. Once you're done look at the marks and the placement of where they're at on the length of ...


2

If you are wondering on how to get a suitable/optimal fingering position, there are some existing research that develop such algorithms. For Guitar fingers position, take a look at the following paper: http://www.csc.kth.se/utbildning/kth/kurser/DD143X/dkand13/Group7Anders/final/Vladimir.Grozman.Christopher.Norman.report.pdf The algorithm is graph-based ...


2

The capo allows you to play a song in a particular key using chord shapes and formations from a different key. For example if you like to use the open (first position) chords in the key of G major such as G, C, D, Em and Am but want to sing a song in the key of A, you can put a capo on the second fret and play the chords as if you were playing in the key of ...


2

The short answer--leave it alone, restring it when you can, and if you happen to notice any issues then give the guitar a day or two before making adjustments so that the replaced string can reverse the effect. The reason that it's not a problem is that the tension which was held by the broken string has been transferred to the remaining strings. The ...


2

You are experiencing electrical interference from one or more external sources. Single-coil pickups are particularly sensitive to this. For instance, are you using the guitar in front of a computer with an old-style cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor? Are you playing in a room illuminated by flourescent tube lighting? You may need to play your guitar in a room ...


2

This sounds perfectly normal; humbuckers get their name because they "buck the hum", the hum being electrical interference which the coils are picking up like an antenna. A humbucker is effectively two single coils configured to cancel out the interference from each other. The exact noise you'll hear can vary quite a bit depending on the building's wiring ...


1

Lending an amp to someone is often a very bad idea, because you risk a lot. Guitar amps are quite sensitive, cranking them up can seriously damage them. You should bring your amp to a guitar shop to let someone check it out... However, before doing that, it might also be that your setting is messed up. Check if your gain is high enough and neutralize your ...


1

It seems we're having the same problem here, tapping into the well-fed musical inner ear we all have rather than being stuck in the over analytical and somewhat sterile frame of mind. My own toolbox for that : Ear training, especially on common melodies, or any melody that just won't leave, even if I have to wait a whole day before testing my solution on ...


1

Maybe get in the habit of singing along with your guitar. Or maybe I should say, play along with your voice. It seems that when you use your voice, your natural creativity comes out more directly. So if you allow your voice and your hands to track each other, maybe your inner creativity will have an easier time flowing through your guitar.


1

One test is to attach a small battery - 1.5v is fine - to each speaker. The cone should jump either in or out on contact. This is mainly for checking the polarity of each speaker, so that they can be connected in series or parallel properly. Connect each individually, not while in circuit. It will tell whether a speaker is still responding, although if ...


1

You don't have to learn Music Theory formally to know how it works just like you learn to speak somewhat fluently before ever going to school to learn English. Just because you learned how to speak basic English without any schooling doesn't mean that you aren't still using the alphabet. Its the same with Music Theory. Humans didn't invent scales, modes, and ...


1

I've owned over 300 guitars and have played for 27 years. I buy and sell. I also repair. I do set ups and finish repair. I will tell you that brand new strings can make a maple neck look old and give you "coal miner's fingers". I think that some graphite is put on the strings as they are being made. Perhaps so as to not rust in the package. Stain can come ...


1

I second the classical guitar position. Depending on which strings have to sound, I try these approaches in this order... (not all are possible depending on the size and shape of your hands and fingers - my index is not very flat so however much pressure is applied strings under the finger grooves won't sound) Fret the barre close to the fret - Apply ...



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