Hot answers tagged

17

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


14

It is not necessary to double the root when converting guitar chords to piano chords but it could be done if fits better with the music. But there are important distinctions between the guitar and piano that come into play when considering how to notate chords on sheet music. These distinctions center around (and are affected by) the way chords are played ...


12

Basically, yes - callouses are your body's protection against damage (that it could incur from pressing hard on the strings, which cut into your flesh) As you become more proficient, you will learn how to press only as hard as is needed, and no more - this will help a lot, but you will still have harder pads on your fingertips. Nylon strung guitars ...


11

Ok, let's clear up some confusion. First: The guitar is a transposing instrument. It sounds one octave below written pitch. Second: The guitar is a "C instrument". What this means is that the guitarist reads "C", they play "C", and we all hear "C". Regardless of the tuning of the individual strings, this fact still applies. In music, with respect to ...


11

Just about every guitarist struggled at some point with barre F. I only ever had one student who simply played it perfectly from the beginning. Despite what some people say, callouses won't help, and squeezing the life out of the neck won't either.Sounds to me like the guitar action is in need of some fettling. If you can put the capo on about fret 4 and ...


9

If you have the drive and dedication to get over the initial awkward and difficult learning curve then I don't see why you can't play any instrument you want. When I first started guitar at the age of 15 I played for probably about 3 weeks or so and then "quit" because I was getting so frustrated and felt like I'd never be able to get it. After about 3 ...


7

There are actually as many "metal" tones as there are metal guitarists. Some of the best metal guitarists in the world use no effects, but simply crank up their Marshall. Others will run a fuzz into a metal distortion then a high gain pre-amp stage, and boosted into distortion within the power amp stage. Still others will run parallel signal paths through ...


7

Some people's calluses seem to be semi-permanent, but others will quickly lose them after a period without playing. There is some related discussion here. However, your concern about tone on the piano is unfounded. Piano keys are not so sensitive that the toughness of your skin is a factor; you have to depress them far more than your finger pads would ...


6

The gauge and material of the strings gives the same note a different timbre on different strings. If you are hearing different pitches, then it may be a product of an untrained ear. The longer you play for, the better your ear becomes and you will be able to better hear pitches and tonality.


6

Overdrive pedals like the tube screamer have a boost to the mid frequencies. When you turn up the output of the O/D pedal in the amp, the middle frequencies get more distorted, while the bass and highs are left more clean. This keeps the bass sound tight, which is essential for fast metal rhythms, and helps the guitars be heard over the low end of double ...


6

I'm hesitant to add an answer, but I don't have enough rep to just comment. In any event, no, that doesn't seem "normal". :) Couldn't tell from the video because your fret hand was out if the frame for most for the video - but are your hands coming off (completely) of the strings when you switch chords? If so I'm wondering if there's a grounding problem... ...


5

If you play CEGC, it won't be parallel eighths. It will simply have the octave doubled. In order to have parallel eighths, you have to have the voices move. If you take guitar chords and put them into sheet music for piano, should you double the root ? There isn't any definite answer here. You certainly have to option to easily double the root (C). So, ...


5

All of the below assumes whatever you do will involve daily practice (at least half an hour but an hour is better) and study (of resources on how to play). You don't need a teacher to learn harmonica but if guitar is your first instrument then a teacher is highly recommended, and for violin almost everyone needs a good teacher to succeed. A diatonic ...


5

Thicker picks (tend to) remain in contact with the string longer. The impulse provided to the string is of longer duration. A longer duration pulse imparts more lower frequency and less higher frequency content. Imagine the thick pick, at an angle, coming in to hit the string. It strikes the string, which starts to move along with the pick, but the pick ...


4

Headstock designs are usually trademarked, and it's the most popular place to put the brand and sometimes the model. Checking the headstock shape and doing web searches for anything written on the headstock is a good place to start. Some places to look for more information, on electric guitars (particularly with bolt-on necks): The back of the headstock ...


4

Yes, this is--sort of--how it works. I've never seen an actual classical score which calls for a detuned guitar, but if you look at transcriptions of rock and blues, they'll write the music "in C" (i.e., as if the guitar were tuned to the most common pitch level of the tuning it's in) and then tell the player that the music will sound some interval lower or ...


4

If your next note is on a lower (i.e., thicker) string (what you call "the string above"), then you could use the same finger that you use for bending. This is done by letting the lower string slip under your finger while you bend, which will allow you to fret that new string by just rolling your finger a little bit. This is done a lot in blues playing, but ...


4

It looks like the missing piece in your case is an audio interface. That's a device that has audio inputs and outputs and also some kind of computer connection, like a USB, Firewire, or Thunderbolt interface. You should look at interfaces that have at least two analog inputs and two analog outputs. There are a couple ways you could set this up, depending on ...


4

Todd beat me to it, and I'd endorse all he suggests. However, it did you well for 6 mths, and Pacificas are well made (why not, it's Yamaha?) beginner guitars, even the entry level ones. Worth selling on to another beginner rather than trying to improve it, and throwing money away, as it'll never be a Strat. Someone else will learn with it, just as you did. ...


4

Distortion and overdrive is done by clipping the signal. So there really isn't a way to recreate this exact sound without some kind of electronic device altering the sound. This article shows some simple wave forms and what distortion looks like. http://www.howtogeek.com/64096/htg-explains-how-do-guitar-distortion-and-overdrive-work/ Resonator guitars ...


4

You can make these a number of ways: simplest: buy from any one of the hundreds of shops online that sell them (even though Allparts sells them by the 100, that's still around $10) speak to a local luthier and ask if you can buy some from them cut them from any flat white plastic (or any colour) - a hole punch of the right diameter is useful here paint ...


4

I can totally understand your question. I experienced the same thing when first learning to play guitar to accompany my singing. I have met some folks who play the guitar very well but cannot combine singing and guitar playing and do both at the same time. Even professional musicians and famous performers often choose to leave the playing up to their ...


4

You'll get the F chord with the bar chords, it just takes time. When I first started learning, I started off with open chords (non-bar), gradually introduced the F chord and then went on to bar chords.. Anyway, it's more of a leverage thing, rather than a "guitar problem" imo. What you do with your thumb/finger placement and wrist angle has a lot to do with ...


3

When I was in a similar situation, I kept the old one around to practice setups on, take to the beach (salt air bad for pickups), and generally for situations where I don't want a nice, expensive instrument. Some time later, I came across an e-Bay sale for some nice pickups that was surprisingly cheap that would fit my old, terrible guitar, so I pulled the ...


3

A pianist is very unlikely to want a literal transcription of what a guitarist does. Anyway, guitarists don't spend all their time strumming 6-string chords! The only answer to this is - it depends. The pianist may be playing one, two...up to six notes in the right hand, a bass line in the left. Or he may be playing a melody in the right hand, chords in ...


3

I found this on the SourceForge forums. Click on the guitar icon on the toolbar and choose "Show Instruments":


3

I've just gone through a number of baroque books and looked at buying the Neumann book mentioned above (Not going to happen at that price though). I finally found the answer though at http://baroqueguitar.homestead.com/The_Baroque_Guitar.htm which states that the bracket means a mordent. I hope this is helpful to anyone else who has been puzzled by this.


3

There is no single correct way to do tremolo-picking. If you analyze how the greats do it you'll realize that everybody has their own technique. I'd suggest to watch videos of relevant players, and analyze their picking hand technique. From my personal experience as a teacher I know that lifting your palm but anchoring with one or two fingers (around where ...


3

Normally all of the following are earthed (soldered to the casing of the volume pot) The outer ring of the jack socket (that's your main earth to the amplifier) The strings (via a wire to the tailpiece or bridge) - this usually reduces interference picked up by the strings The anti-clockwise tab of the volume pot (this little wire is essential for the ...


3

You should really base your choice of what to learn based on which one you most like rather than which one is easiest. In truth, no instrument is easier than any other when played at the highest level of musicianship, just some instruments are easier to get started on than others. Violin and guitar are fully chromatic instruments meaning that every note is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible