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12

While I've read several different sources recommending not removing all the strings at once, I've never read a good reason why not, and I've always restrung by removing all the strings first. The main reason is exactly as you say: to be able to clean and condition everything under the strings. I clean the fretboard and body area, oil the fretboard, and even ...


10

I think the main reason why people dissuade from taking off all strings is historical: on violin-family instruments as well as many archtop guitars, the bridge is not fixed on the instrument at all. It just stands freely on the top surface – normally held in place by the strings. But if you take the strings off, the bridge will fall, and you need to be ...


6

One sticker on the guitar body will by any reasonable metric make diddly squat difference to the sound being made. There's just no way such an imperceptible change in mass will affect the resonance, and it's not like a sticker is going to restrict vibration of the surface either. I mean hell, most acoustic guitars have big plastic pickguards on them, and ...


6

The difference is that the nylon strings on the classical are all close to the same diameter, whereas on the steel string the diameter of the smallest string might be about 20% of the size of the diameter of the largest. This matters because the physics you have learned is simplified. Only string that have no thickness and no stiffness exactly fit the ...


6

The sensitivity of your playing is both more precise than whatever measuring tool you might be using and it's also the most important measurement of the usefulness of the pick. Who cares what some ruler says? If the pick is not pleasing you, toss it to most attractive person in the crowd and grab the next one! I sometimes ditch picks that haven't lost any ...


5

First of all I want to say congratulations on your decision to learn guitar. As I am sure you have already discovered, it is not an easy instrument to master - but once things begin to come together and you start learning to change from chord to chord and play songs, it is very rewarding. And since there is always room for improvement no matter how good you ...


5

The main reasons have already been mentioned, but to elaborate with a few practical tips: Truss rod tension The tension of the strings is counterbalancing tension of the truss rod, and when string tension is removed the truss rod is "free" to bend the neck. While it's extremely unlikely that a guitar that was correctly set up would break from removal of ...


5

There are oodles of tab-reading tutorials out there so I'll keep this basic (just google-search "how to read guitar tabs"). The "lowest" string on the paper is your "lowest" string pitchwise (your low-E) but the "highest" string physically (closest to you). Each number represents the fret number to hold down and play. We move from left to right and play ...


5

No, there is no other term that I know of. The term "crossover" seems to be the term everybody uses, but sometimes they add "nylon-string" to make sure that people know they are not talking about guitars with steel strings. I have written extensively about crossover guitars on my blog, circa 2009. My first blog entry is here: ...


4

You are incorrect in your assertion that there is a physical law being broken here. A guitar has six strings of different diameters, different materials (some strings are a plain length of steel wire, whereas others have other wires wrapped around the steel wire core) and tensile strengths, tuned to different pitches. As a result, there must be a compromise ...


4

There are a lot of different ways you can look at naming chord in general. I see two very likely candidates for the name, but first let's clean up some note naming so it's a little easier to see. Let's not call the Db a Db, but it's enharmonic equivalent C# as it will make the naming much simpler. We could look at it as some kind of B chord. In this case we ...


4

It helps if you just listen to the metronome, tapping along with your foot and saying some four-syllable word on each beat (e.g. "caterpillar"). Each syllable then represents one 16th note, so you get a feeling for how 16th notes sound at the given tempo. As soon as you can hear the 16th notes in your head, you should also be able to play them. I would ...


3

That is relatively rate for a Les Paul, as most have fixed bridges, but that is a Floyd Rose Licensed Tremolo. Edit (actually, on closer inspection, it is not a Floyd Rose but some other type) - a device to allow you to change the tension, and hence pitch, of all six strings at once. It is a logical development of the old Fender trem, and it can cope with a ...


3

At the beginning stages of your journey towards learning to play guitar, your best approach would be to memorize the basic chord shapes (formations) of the chords you want to play. So you know that an A major chord requires you to fret the D G and B strings on the second fret. For now that is all you need to know to play an A chord. You can build quite ...


3

The simple test to see if the electrics in your guitar work is to plug it into a guitar amp. Take it around to a friend's or even to a guitar shop - they should happily let you test it. If it works through an amp, then the guitar is fine - then you need to look at why it may not work with Rocksmith. From what I know of the cabling, I'd suspect the no cable ...


3

I recently took up playing again after a gap of many years. My fingers remembered what to do but the pain was pretty excruciating. I just ignored it and eventually it went away. Little and often is the best way. Keep your guitar near you when watching TV and just pick it up during the adverts and play a few chords then put it down again. This gives your ...


3

Well that's not exactly the way to practice scales because that's not how our memory works. A memory is stronger if it is related to more memories. And remember that you are exercising your brain, not your fingers. If the exercise doesn't make you think then it's not a good exercise. Now, the most basic way to practice a scale while making you think is ...


3

Yes, the concepts are simple. Each mode keeps the tonality of the diatonic parent scale but starts / ends on different notes. For example: Parent Scale / Ionian - C D E F G A B C Dorian - D E F G A B C D Phrygian - E F G A B C D E etc through all of the other scale degrees. When people discuss "playing in the right mode", they are talking about using ...


3

We all experience considerable frustration when learning a musical instrument. Two years is, in general, simply not enough time to be expressing emotions effectively in ones playing. Depending on your age, this may just be a natural state of affairs. Males in the mid-teens to early-twenties are often overwhelmed by other issues and may subconsciously ...


3

Dynamics include everything that changes the sound -- such as speed, volume, tone, and more. Speed varies from fast to slow, while rests often provide dramatic effect. Volume varies from loud to soft, and the decay of volume varies from sustained (compressor) to pizzicato (such as palm-muted). Tone varies from the mechanical changes such as picking style ...


3

At the end of the day they are all the same scales just the application to learn them is different. Every system has it's own uses and reasons. The CAGED system gets you to focus on how the different barre chords you play and the pentatonic scales they are related to line up. The sweeping patterns is thinking of the scales in terms of the sweeping lead ...


2

I fully agree with Todd Wilcox, but I'll try to open the subject a bit more. The main argument why different sources tell you not to remove all strings at once is because the neck is adjusted to be straight by matching the tension between your strings and the truss rod. If you remove all strings at once your neck adjustment is off because you just removed ...


2

Google has been my friend to at least establish that I'm not the only one with this problem :) It isn't so much making the chord, but doing so without compromising either the high E or the Bb. Even professionals tend to either duck the high E in order to get a nice full C7 (including John Williams, yes check it out!), or stretch to the high E and partially ...


2

A form of F♯m11. As there's F♯, C♯, A, the triad of F♯m, with a ♭7 (E) and a 4 (B). 11ths sometimes have the 9th missing, as in this case, but must have a 7th of some sort. Can't be called a sus 4, as the 3 is still there. Often guitar needs to omit something, as it's not easily available to finger/fret. The ...


2

You are right in the way modes can be explained. Using Ionian as a basis - the full major as we know it now, sounds 'right' when we start and finish on the root note/chord. When we use the same set of notes, but use the 6th note/chord as 'home', we think of being in a minor key. This actually often has a sharpened leading note, which makes the change back to ...


2

Callouses should only take a couple weeks to a month but will take longer to get to their full thickness. Strength will be something you build and maintain as long as you play. You'll also learn precise finger placement that will let you fret well with less strength. It may take a few years before strength is not a concern for you at all. Addendum: If you ...


2

I think it's better you try to understand and study the basic theories and the fret board first. Next, try to learn to play the major scale chords. It'll take some time since your finger tips are smooth, but don't give up. What most of the people do is simply giving up when they start hurting their finger tips. Nothing is easy. You need the dedication to ...


2

Yes. But it depends on what is your guitar, what's the wood, where you place it, how thick is the sticker. I'm assuming your Yamaha F335 is made of a plywood, then if you place your sticker on the back of your guitar, it'll be fine I guess. But if you place it on your fingerboard, it will affect the sound so much. But I know you'll place it somewhere on ...


2

You may know the basic theory behind scales, chords, and keys and how to apply them to the piano, but you still need to learn how to apply them to the guitar. You understand the basic concepts and that's great, but you still shouldn't skip around in any lesson because you'll need to know how it ties into your instrument. For example, you know how to build ...


2

I think it's rather inept & cruel of your teacher to tell you your playing is void of emotion. That's subjective, and is intangible so very hard to know how to fix, or know when you've fixed it. Even if you did, you'd only have been satisfying your teacher. I'm really sorry to hear it made you quit. Example: I find Bon Jovi utterly devoid of emotion or ...



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