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15

I use this kind of "A-shape" barre chord all the time, although I must admit I rarely teach it to students. I actually find it easier than using fingers 2, 3 and 4 to play the three fret 3 notes. All you have to do is bend your third L.H. finger backwards, so that the joint nearest the knuckle moves forwards and away from string 1. Here's a picture of me ...


13

Not everybody can do this but the trick is your finger forms a 2nd, partial barre at the 3rd fret, but bends so it raises above the highest string. Some people play A like this as standard however I believe it partly comes down to luck how long your fingers are, how practical this technique will be. Check out this awful drawing:


9

One effect that is relevant for the wear on metal cored strings is work-hardening -- the repeated bending of the string through use causes microscopic changes in the crystalline structure of the strand of steel, affecting its stiffness and ultimately leading to breakage. Similar to bending a paper clip back and forth until it breaks. This affects the tone ...


8

The numbers tell you which left hand finger to use (index being 1, pinky being 4 - thumb not included on guitar of course). The Roman numerals tell you which position to play in. This is similar to which fret, as you suggest, but indicates the fret position of the left hand, not the actual note. This is done by putting a Roman numeral for the fret which ...


8

Strap locks are generally designed for electric guitars, because electrics are more often heavy, and it's heavy instruments that tend to shake their straps loose. Hence, locking buttons are usually attached with a long wood screw, buried into the solid wood. Acoustics tend not to have those deep solid wooden areas. If you like to have your strap attached ...


7

I believe the effects are: The oil & muck from your fingers getting into the string :"A third effect is the build up of fatty/gummy gunk (oils from your skin mixed with dust from the air), either on the surface of the string or in the grooves of the wound strings. This has the effect of adding additional internal friction to the string (sort of like ...


6

Changing the tuning on a Stratocaster is always a slow and painful process, unless you block the tremolo system. Small changes, like normal day-to-day tuning, simply return the bridge to balance and do not cause problems. However, changing to D tuning significantly changes string tension, which affects the balance of the bridge. Changing even one string down ...


6

An interval is just the distance between two notes. The name perfect 5th comes from the idea of a scale. For example the C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The 5th note of the scale is G hence the 5th of the C major scale is G. The interval is perfect because if we flip the interval we would get a 4th which exist in the G major ...


6

I don't see any reason why you can't experiment with different tunings for the pairs of strings on a 12-string guitar. But it is worth bearing in mind a few things: you will need to choose the appropriate gauge of strings; a standard set of 12-string guitar strings are designed for the regular tuning. you will have to learn a completely new set of chord ...


5

Okay, after quite a bit of thought I think I have worked this out. However, before answering, two things: firstly, I have to say, I haven't seen this notation before and it doesn't seem very helpful; secondly, the other answer and comments helped me work this out. Also, it is worth pointing out for other readers, that this passage of music has the ...


5

Tuning up will increase the tension on the neck which can affect (i.e., increase) the action. This is, however, no big deal because it can be corrected by adjusting the truss rod. This also means that basing your decision on the action of the guitar is not such a good idea because the action can be adjusted rather easily on any decent guitar. You could ...


5

1. Stop Playing 2. Go to the Doctor Seriously, your health is more important than your studies and your playing. Why potentially damage a half century of playing guitar and your career to save a few hours? What you describe doesn't sound trivial to me and could be indicative of something more serious that could affect all areas of your life, not just your ...


5

Lots of very good guitarists do it, and lots don't. It really comes down to personal taste or rather, try both and see which works better for you. The argument for it is obviously in the name - it anchors your hand better meaning greater stability and precision. If you don't need to anchor to be rock-steady, don't - I guess if you have perfect anchoring ...


5

I'm not sure this is an answer, so much as a list of things to consider… Simple rule - more gain, more buzz. Guitar pickups are, by their very nature, susceptible to all kinds of interference - hum from fluorescent tubes, old-style CRT TVs etc & to a lesser degree, even assuming everything is properly earthed, the mains circuit itself. Any fluctuation ...


5

Dom's answer is of course correct, but I think there's a misunderstanding as to what is meant by 'pattern'. In Dom's answer, he refers to the interval structure of a scale as 'pattern'. In this sense he is of course right that the patterns of major and minor pentatonic scales are different. However, I believe that Chris refers to patterns on the neck of the ...


5

The first thing to note is that to specify a key, you need both a root note and a formula. A root note on its own is not sufficient. A minor and C major contain the same notes, so we can say they are different modes of the same scale. Another way of saying this is that A minor is the relative minor of C major, and C major is the relative major of A minor. ...


5

You actually need a "Preamp" with a line-out port and any mic preamp will do the job. A guitar pickup is a passive device that is to weak to create a line level signal, so it needs to be amplified to the line level for your speaker. Most probably your speakers have only a "Line-in" port. Line level is ok, but with preamps you may reach higher levels ...


5

Both answers are great, but do you know there are other ways to play this chord here. The index barre can be over all 6 strings, which can all be strummed. It just gives an inversion of Bb. 3 fingers can be used, on 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings. Otherwise, two fingers can be used, with two strings held down by one finger, and the other with another finger. As ...


4

I don't know the answer but I feel for you - but seriously: See a doctor!! This is your health you're talking about, and although it might not seem so at the moment, that's much more important than your exams. I know you can get pain in all sorts of weird places when your nerves are messed up, and back pain may be a factor in that, but I'm no doc. It may be ...


4

You mentioned that you used to tune it from the high E (1st) string to the low E. Since you have a tremolo system, anytime that you change the tension on a string (by tuning it), the tremolo will move, as Bradd pointed out above (even if it moves just a tiny bit). When you arrive at the 6th string to tune it, that string will have the most effect on the ...


4

Blindfolding might be taking it a bit too far, but I guess it can't hurt. I personally like to play in the dark. :) I find it helps in several respects: Obviously, it's going to help you learn to play automatically, without any crutches, and reinforce your muscle memory. I've also found that it helps you focus your attention on your sound and execution: ...


4

The standard way to do this is without hinges anyway. Build it using the catches you usually see on flight cases. I'll post up a couple of pictures later to show you what I mean.


4

The problem with the definitions you dug up is that they refer to different things. The usual meaning of "perfect fifth" is in contrast to a "tempered fifth". In relation to a guitar, a perfect fifth is the interval you get between the first harmonic (over fret 12) and the second harmonic (over fret 7). When tuning, the most pleasing interval between most ...


4

There's two things going on that you need to understand. The pattern for the major and minor scales are different. If you were to play a C major pentatonic scale you would play the notes C, D, E, G, A. If you were playing the C minor pentatonic you would play the notes C, Eb, F, G, Bb. Both are shown below: There are major and minor pentatonic ...


3

While teachers and self-study are excellent ways to learn anything, when it comes to learning the blues, I believe you can profit greatly by finding someone who is just a little bit better than you, and just sit down and play together. While the form has evolved over time to embrace real sophistication, it started as a type of folk music. Playing three ...


3

There are hinges that are 'open'. They act like hinges until at 90 degrees, then split. Or - use a small version of the hasp and staple used on gates. They are available for small cupboards, and once open, the lid can slide sideways and come off the pins.Rather like 'rising butt' hinges found on some doors. A really cheap and cheerful solution is to use a ...


3

The reasoning behind the chord voicing you found in the book is that it is a pure four-part voicing of a dominant seventh-chord, without repetition of notes. So you don't need any other strings to play that chord. Of course, the chord shape you suggest is well known and it sound good in most contexts, but it is redundant in the sense that it doubles the ...


3

A Semitone is the next physical adjacent note on a piano after a given pitch. Semitones are also often called "half-steps". If you pick a note on the piano, and count seven half-steps higher or lower, it will result in a perfect-fifth. For Example: A given fundamental note is "C". "C" to "C#" is one semitone. C->C#, C#->D, D->D#, D#->E, E->F, F->F#, ...


3

The term "Perfect Fifth" is used to define an interval between two notes in a diatonic scale in Western Music. It's confusing because "fifth" sounds like a fraction (as in one fifth of 100 = 20). But while there is a ratio involved (the frequency ratio of the sound waves between the bass and high note) the term fifth as used in "Perfect Fifth" does not ...


2

Tabs are usually done in parallel with "real" scores containing the detailed timing information. Where a tab is supposed to be self-sufficient, it has to contain quite more information than a "standard" tab. Take a look at the LilyPond documentation for \tabFullNotation: the text a bit above shows how things look with a standard score/tab combination ...



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