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24

Partly due to the thicker string gauge, but also because you will be plucking the string closer to its middle point (if your pick or R.H. finger/thumb plucks in the same place.) This excites fewer of the upper harmonics of the string, giving a mellower sound. In classical guitar music you are often asked to play closer to the middle of the string to produce ...


23

When you lower the pitch by releasing tension, there might be slack in the gears in the tuning machines, which might make the string go below the intended pitch. By going further down and approaching the target note from below, there will be force applied to the gears and when you've reached the correct pitch the gears have less potential to move. So your ...


12

I think you should always check with an open E chord AND an open C chord. This is because you have to find a compromise between the two. If the E is perfect then the C will be (slightly) wrong (the open G string will be flat); otherwise, if the C sounds good, then the third of E (g#) will sound sharp (even sharper than it should ...). If you have good ears, ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


11

There are left handed guitar players who just turn a right stringed guitar over and play that way, so it is possible. With very good results even, see e.g. Albert King: So it is not unheard of to play that way. Like others have indicated, you need more power for the lower strings, which is suited for the thumb. Plucking chords becomes more difficult with ...


7

You could play any number of different C6 chords: some using barres, some higher up the neck, chords with or without C in the bass and even chords that double an open string note. But practically, it makes sense to play the C6 shape that is closest to the common open C shape, as this is probably what you are most familiar with, and as it will be close to ...


6

Try playing something complex on the top (thin) string. Now try the same on the fat string. The fretting hand is more comfortable not being stretched. I suppose more intricate note patterns are traditionally played on the high strings, whereas the E and A would be used for more static bass-like patterns. It gives a slight advantage to the player the way it ...


6

Moderate or Moderato is a convention from back before the invention and widespread use of the quartz-powered metronome. Tempo markings are a relatively recent invention, and they are used for their simplicity and accuracy. However, many composers choose to omit them because the "idea" of the tempo of the piece is more important than an absolute value. Other ...


6

I've been searching online, talking with musicians about this, and here are some techniques I retained, with some interrogations : Get out of scales from time to time Totally off-scale, no limit (really?) Play a riff and play it elsewhere For instance and play it off one half-tone higher, and then come back / play it a half-tone higher again Ascend and ...


6

I've seen some sheet music like this before, brought to me by guitar pupils from Hong Kong. The cross-headed notes are quite easy to get your head around; they simply show you which strings to pick while using the chords above the TAB stave, and the rhythm of these arpeggiated notes. The arrows show how many strings to strum for the chords above the TAB ...


5

You say not to be consider intonation in this question, But to my mind they account for the defining factor in which check chord you should use. If intonation is disregarded then the tuning chord is redundant, because everything is perfect whatever chord you use. If you tune to an open E chord and then play an open D then the D will be slightly out of tune ...


5

Chromatic finger exercises with a metronome will help if your fingers are really weak. This is where you play 4 notes on each string from low (low e) to high (high e), and then back up again to low e. One finger on each fret, and when you have done all 6 strings, you start by moving one note up and do the exercise in the next position. (for example, you ...


5

While is very tempting to approach improvisation focusing on phrases and licks, your solo may sound very awkward if you play unrelated chunk of melodies/ideas without thinking about beginning/development/ending. One aspect I love - and judge to be very important - about jazz improvisation are 'motifs', and you can't really apply that to a single phrase. ...


4

Looking online, there are plenty of explanations for particular guitar tunings (open, drop etc.), but I haven't found a definitive explanation of why the lowest string is "at the top" and the highest string is "at the bottom", to help reinforce this answer. Like Tim, I can't wait to see how other people answer this question, particularly as I often tell my ...


4

The word Moderate indicates the name for the tempo; each tempo has a different name. Here is a list of the names: adagio: very slow. allegretto: fairly quick, slightly slower than allegro. allegro: lively, rather quick. andante: rather slow, at a moderate, walking pace. andantino: this used to mean a little slower than ...


4

Mark the side of the fingerboard of how deep you want the scallops with masking tape. You'll need to mask tape the frets as well to avoid sanding marks and file marks With a rat tailed file, file to depth at the middle of each fret. You'll need some half round bastard files for the majority of the work. Start from the edge of each fret a carefully file ...


4

I would just like to point out something that has not been mentioned. Using a finger from your right hand (and no amplification on the guitar), hammer on to a note on the fretboard. Listen closely, and you will hear two distinct notes ringing out. One is the note you would expect to hear -- the fretted note. The other note is the portion of the string ...


4

You know what you should do is learn jazz tunes. Learn the heads on the standards then worry about improvisation. It is limitless what can be done in the Jazz world but you have to know fundamentals. Your second post is too general, so I am assuming you need to learn standards and listen to a lot of Miles and look at transcriptions of his playing. Start ...


3

Guitars have not always been strung from low to high, the baroque guitar use re-entrant tunings, e.g. See Monica Hall's excellent website for more information about the Baroque guitar, including stringing. Essentially stringing low to high is a bizarre newfangled idea! ;o)


3

Learn how to tune your guitar -- with an electric tuner or otherwise -- so that your ear becomes trained to those pitches. (Being in concert pitch will also help you play along with others, or even the television.) Then, as @Tim says, learn some chords so that you can explore the harmonic qualities of the instrument. The typical starter chords are the open ...


3

Here are a few things that jazz players play over a dominant chord and give a 'jazzy' sound Let's say the chord that is being played is G7. What you can play is: G#o Arpeggio (G# is b9 of G7, so that note can also be added in the chord) G# auxiliary diminished scale If the chord is G7#5, you can play the whole tone scale. If the chord is G7(alt) (which ...


3

I know a measure contains a certain number beats? Yes. the number of beats is defined by the meter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meter_(music). The time signature is a notational device defines both the meter and the unit that is used to denote the beats of the meter. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_signature But could you relate beats with chords and ...


3

There is indeed! (at 1m46s) I don't believe they're widely manufactured though, not from what I could find


2

There's a point of paramount importance the answers so far haven't even mentioned: as with anything nonlinear (and metal-guitar distortion is the most nonlinear you get in audio production) it makes very much a difference whether you EQ before the distortion, or – with exactly the same settings – after the amp plugin. That's why you can't just simulate ...


2

I have never seen anything like that, very cool. As for the material, I wouldn't use wood, use something harder and with a lower coefficient of friction eg nut or saddle materials such as corian, bone, brass, or some fret wire etc. I recommend black TUSQ XL http://www.graphtech.com/products/product-categories/acoustic-saddles As you need to tune both ...


2

It's actually pretty pointless putting 'moderato' there, as a proper tempo is written. This gives exactly the speed of the piece, in beats per minute, each beat being shown as a crotchet.Back in the Classical days, composers would put the Italian words, which gave a rough to fairly good idea as to the pace of the piece. Nowadays, it's more usual to put the ...


2

There are already a lot of answers that give you tips as to how to play a C6 on the guitar, and how to change between C and C6. However, I would like to point out one more important thing that many beginners do not realize: a C6 chord can always be replaced by a standard C chord. If you listen to the song then you'll realize that the melody implies a C6 at ...


2

There will often be some friction at various parts of the tuning linkage, as well as at the nut (where the string passes over). At some points, including the nut, things may bind slightly. Think about what would happens if the string is binding where it passes over the nut, both in the "tightening" and "loosening" cases. If the string binds where it ...


2

Two ideas: use the 'A' shape barre on fret 3 for C, and drop pinky onto top string, 5th fret to produce C6. Or - Barre fret 8, use E shape chord, and drop pinky onto 2nd string, 10th fret for C6.There is another not so good version of C6 in that Am7 uses the same notes, and Am7 open is an easy chord to play. Trouble is,this change doesn't sound as good. Use ...


2

That is a bit of a transition. What makes it a 6th chord is the added A. You could try a first position C chord (like the one in the song), but finger it with your pinky on the 3rd fret A string, third finger on D string E (2nd fret), middle finger for G string A (second fret), and B string C (first fret) with your index finger as usual. I.e. add 3rd string, ...



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