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13

How often you should change guitar strings depends on how often you play, the chemistry of the oils in your fingers, and your personal preferences for budget, comfort, and tone. I like to put new strings on a guitar after about a month of play, assuming about two hours of playing time a day. I have a personal preference for newer strings that sound new and ...


10

They are indeed called horns. In the 60s/70s, Burns made some electric guitars called Black Bison, I seem to remember,and the horns did resemble those of a bison.The cutaway is necessary to reach higher frets, but if the horns were removed as well, the balance of the instrument would be compromised even more. Besides which,as you say, most manufacturers need ...


9

Typically a lead guitarist plays melody lines with a rhythm guitarist and other instruments such as bass, drums, keyboard etc. A solo guitarist, however, is always the only guitar, and is sometimes the only instrument (you can have a single person singing and playing solo guitar, or you can have guitar and drums etc.) So the definition is simply to ...


9

Short answer: no. As a non-drying vegetable oil, it will eventually become rancid and not be fun. Same as safflower, peanut, sunflower, coconut, palm, etc. A better choice is a "drying oil" such as linseed oil, walnut oil, or a non-organic mineral oil or tung oil. Some folks have had good results using a citrus oil (orange, lemon) to clean, and then an ...


8

Minor pent works well over major chords, but not vice versa. Add the 'blue' note to both maj. and min. pents for a little spice. Try the full major scale notes on major songs. Try the full minor scales (3 of them!) on minor songs. Use the Mixolydian mode for major songs. Use the Dorian mode for minor songs. Use the Lydian mode for major songs. On major songs ...


7

It's a bit of all sorts. Finger/hand strength and mobility are important, and will improve with more playing.Some new chords will require adaptations of existing fingerings, such as putting a pinky down as a changed note in a barre chord for a 6th or 7th. Thus, they're easy to learn. Sometimes, one finger needs to be flat across 2 or 3 strings, whilst the ...


6

The answers given so far offer excellent and accurate advice on learning chord changes in general! But I will offer a tip that will help many beginning (and some experienced) guitarist with the specific change from G to C which is what your question is about. I am not sure how you are fingering your G and C chords but there are several different ways to ...


6

The dots indicate the notes that are in the C major scale. The red ones are C. The "patterns" are places where you can easily reach all of the notes of the scale. For example, in Pattern 4, you place your index finger on the 7th fret, and then you can play a C major scale 2 octaves (plus an extra note on top and bottom) just with your 4 fingers, without ...


5

There are chords that are played one over another, called bichords or polychords in general, such as the Petruschka chord (C over F#). They rarely occur in popular music. The naming convention is "X over Y", e.g. "A over Cm7". The notation looks like a fraction, with a horizontal line rather than a diagonal slash between the chord names: I don't think ...


5

Here is my 2 cents worth. The answer probably depends on the situation and context. It also probably depends on what whoever uses the respective terms mean. "Lead Guitarist" is commonly understood to refer to the guitarist in a band who plays the "guitar solos" and fancier fills, runs, and licks along with a "rhythm guitarist" who maintains the rhythm ...


5

Olive oil, or any other vegetable-based oil, is not recommended for oiling any wood as it may go bad, or rancid, after a while. Most commercially available fretboard oils use mineral oil as their main ingredient. Mineral oil is inexpensive, will not go bad, and is readily available at most pharmacies. So if you want a cheap and virtually identical ...


5

It's best to just wipe down your fret board with a damp clean cotton cloth. This is what Martin Guitars recommends for cleaning the fret boards of their acoustic guitars and it does work.


4

The books I've seen suggest that when you solo over a dominant seventh chord, try playing a half-whole diminished scale. The reason this works is that the scale contains all the notes of the dominant seventh chord. Here's the half-whole scale starting on C together with the C7 chord: H-W dim scale: C C# D# E F# G A A# C C7 chord: C E G Bb ...


4

Start off by finding some tabs (or sheet music, if you can read that) that will teach you the three octatonic (=diminished) scales. Or, you can just figure them out for yourself; it's pretty easy! There are only three of them, and they all alternate half-steps and whole-steps. So pick a pitch--any pitch!--and: Start alternating half and whole steps. After ...


4

While any latency does upset the feedback loop between ears-brain-fingers, you can of course work around this through practice. You could probably become proficient without being able to hear the sounds at all. Sure, it could slow down learning until your brain has come to terms with the latency delay, but as you still have the physical touch feedback from ...


4

You can carefully remove one to check how they work, but I guess there is no screw because they have a raised pin on each tuner body, that goes into a small hole drilled into the back of the headstock. This pin & hole is concealed under the body of the tuner in normal use. So you should definitely check this before buying new tuners, you might just be ...


4

I too haven't changed the strings on any of my guitars for years. They may not sound as good as newer strings would, but they're still perfectly playable - I'm not doing any paid-for recording or gigging work so I don't see a problem. On bass, many people even prefer the sounds of older, deader strings - some bassists simply never change them, and it wouldn'...


4

They're called horns: The indentations next to them (beside the neck) are referred to as cutouts or cutaways, and are usually more often what is referenced in relation to the general shape of a guitar body. In the image I've provided, the guitar is a single cutaway, and the image you have shown is a double cutaway.


4

I empathise with you. For years, I played like that. Each solo was learned individually. Then it was realised that some players tended to use the same set of notes in a lot of their solos. For instance, pentatonic minor. Once it was realised that the sound of that scale was distinctive, I could recognise the sound of the same set of notes in other solos.So, ...


4

The only difference in a major scale and its relative minor, is the tonic center. When you solo on C major scale, you play with the C as your tonic. If you change that, to A (with the A natural minor scale), you will focus on another note and the whole outcome will sound different. Another way to see what difference the change in the tonic makes are modes....


3

Generally speaking, yes, you should change those strings. One of the big reasons to change your strings somewhat frequently is tone. The tone, or sonic quality, of your instrument depends on several factors, including your strings. Newer strings have a brighter tone and tend to have more clarity. Part of the change in tone as strings age has to do with ...


3

In the end you can use pretty much any arbitrary scales, switch between them and still sound awesome, as long as there's tasteful structure to it. For example if the song is currently in E minor, try putting in some phrases in D, F, F# or G major diatonic scales, but regularly return to the familiar Em pentatonic. My general advice would be to listen to ...


3

There isn't really much of a difference. When you shift slide on the guitar, you are trying to get the note as fast as you can while still making it noticeable that you shifted your hand by hitting the notes in between. Shift slides are generally rather fast while a glissando can be drawn out. Glissandos on guitar (and other instruments too such as piano ...


3

in terms of position or general role in a band i don't find much distinction between he term "lead" and "solo" guitarists. whens the last time you heard a guitarist who ONLY played solos? one of the useful distinction between the two, i find, is compositional focus. if the part played by the lead guitarist becomes the focus of the song at that point he or ...


3

You have a few issues there. I'll go for the obvious ones: you are taking too much time to change notes you are stopping a note before you play the next one you aren't using a compressor Practice sorts out those first two - timing your pick hand and fretting hand will make a major difference. Slash plays some notes as hammer-ons and pull-offs as well. A ...


3

If you want to avoid the whole ruler thing, you can actually find tab sheets; like for instance in this site, where there are PDFs with empty guitar tabs for you to print for free: There are many different layouts for you available just on that site: But also, you can buy these kind of sheet at some music stores. I have seen in guitar shops, but I'm ...


3

This usually happens because not all your fingers have the same strength and you don't know how to control your finger strength. It's pretty common for a beginner, nothing to worry about. In order to get an evenly balanced sound on all of the fingers, try working only with the fingers on open strings. Play all of the fingers and try to use the same strength....


3

Yes, they would change. Try to think of the notes not on the fret, but on the specific position on the string. So, if you lower the tuning on that string, let's say by a whole tone, the note that was on the 5th fret would move up to the 7th fret. Similarly if you tune your strings up. If you tune the whole bass/guitar a whole tone lower, then the fingerings ...


3

A few thoughts for you. Learning to play chords on guitar doesn't really fit the mechanics that most people are used to with their hands. Having difficulty with some chords (or chord voicings) after one month is not surprising or uncommon. You could try arpeggiating the chords (playing out each note of the chord individually). This would allow you to ...


3

~The Chorus~ Chorus is awesome! Thanks to its over use in the 1960's, it's sound can make a whole song sound bluesy. The Walrus Audio Julia is the best chorus that I know of and is also the most vintage sounding, which is essential for a chorus to sound bluesy. ~The overdrive~ A light overdrive is all you need for jazz :). Not too much drive to kill the ...



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