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20

Why do guitarists re-fret their guitars? We re-fret guitars because you can get fret wear from playing. The most common type is when the upper frets of the guitar, usually around 17-20, will wear down because of playing and once the frets are worn down then the strings will begin to rattle more and the guitar will sound less clear. There are materials that ...


16

Just about every guitarist struggled at some point with barre F. I only ever had one student who simply played it perfectly from the beginning. Despite what some people say, callouses won't help, and squeezing the life out of the neck won't either.Sounds to me like the guitar action is in need of some fettling. If you can put the capo on about fret 4 and ...


12

If you play a steel string guitar enough, the steel strings eventually wear down the frets to a point where the intonation is out of balance because the frets lose their crown (which provides a precise point of contact for the string when fretting). And certain frets will wear more than others which makes it impossible to maintain a low action across all ...


9

Actually you might be on to something. I know from teaching beginning guitarist (and from my own personal experience) that learning to contort your fingers and hands into the correct position to instantly finger a given chord is very difficult. Nothing in the natural everyday world provides any advance training for those type hand formations and movements -...


8

Hammer-ons. Rather than putting your fingers on the appropriate strings/frets one at a time, try to get them down as a hammer-on. After all, this is how, hopefully, you will end up forming them when you are playing. All fingers need to land together and firmly.You sort of make the chord shape before you smartly land them on the strings. Of course it'll take ...


6

Try experimenting with different points of contact. For instance, pressing down with the index finger flat against the string like this will likely result in a few dead strings since you are using the fleshy part of the finger. Instead, try rotating the index finger slightly so it is more the side of the finger that is in contact with the strings: Note ...


5

You'll get the F chord with the bar chords, it just takes time. When I first started learning, I started off with open chords (non-bar), gradually introduced the F chord and then went on to bar chords.. Anyway, it's more of a leverage thing, rather than a "guitar problem" imo. What you do with your thumb/finger placement and wrist angle has a lot to do with ...


4

I would certainly read it as: Start accelerating at the accelerando so that you are playing at a moderato tempo when you get to the moderato, then continue to play moderato until you reach another tempo marking or the end of the piece. That might not be exactly how others play it, and every performance involves interpretation of the score by the ...


4

Looking at the site you linked and clicking on each fret to change the pattern, there are actually only 5 (not 9) completely different distinct patterns that repeat. Several are exactly the same notes and some show a slight variation on the same basic "pattern". Allow me to expand on some of the other answers. The basic patterns for the minor ...


4

Sounds like your 12th fret is too low, since you need to move up the fretboard to the 13th fret to get the note you should be getting on the 12th, so you need to move the bridge saddle towards the pickups, which is the opposite of what you're doing. You want to shorten the length of your string, and by tightening the screw you're lengthening it. Could also ...


4

I'm going to assume that by "left leg", what you mean is "left leg in the style of a classical guitarist, with the left leg elevated on a small stool and the neck of the guitar raised up very high". Left leg with the neck parallel to the ground would be ridiculous, and impossible for a steel string acoustic for one to get one's picking hand around to the ...


4

That image only shows three octaves, even though it shows eight different positions on the guitar where one can play an E. The trick of the diagram is that the E notes that are the same color and are connected in the same line are the same note. They are not in different octaves, but exactly the same. So even though there are eight fret positions where you ...


4

Picking near the octave (specifically, an octave above the fretted notes) can produce a neat effect since it emphasizes the second harmonic. However, I find it's better for individual notes or slower glides across the strings than for rhythm strumming. In either case, however, striking the guitar top is poor technique. Even extreme angles of attack ...


4

First off, it's an inversion when the lowest sounding note is anything other than the root note of the chord. If you play an A chord with the low E string sounding, then that's an inversion. Second, perhaps in your particular situation and with your guitar, it's hard to notice a difference between letting the low E sound or not when playing an A chord, but ...


3

A few thoughts... A theremin cello has a ribbon that controls the pitch, a guitar has frets. In effect this is similar to having a fretless and fretted neck in one. Is it doable? Perhaps. Is it practical? Probably not. The electronics are no problem, in fact all you need is a "blend" control. Another thing to consider is the pitch range of the theremin. ...


3

You can approximate electric guitar sustain by playing a fiddle bow on the unwound strings. You need to apply resin to the fiddle bow to get it to sound and you need to clean the resin off of your guitar after you play or it may affect the finish. You can also approximate some electric guitar like sounds by playing with a slide or bottleneck on the unwound ...


3

Do check your guitar's action (or get it checked). If your strings are too high, that won't help. Technique is a big deal. Rolling the barre finger to be barring with the more-bony outside of the finger is essential. Make sure your elbow is closer to your body, which rolls your wrist into the right position to put your finger in the right position and ...


3

Try this: index does a barre on the first two strings middle finger on third string little pinky finger on 4th string ring finger on 5th string thumb on 6th string Of course it requires a bit practice, but as does any other method I guess. But once you get it, you realize that this position seems very natural


3

When I was struggling to play barre chords, I found that what helped me a lot was - every so slightly - just rolling my index finger backwards (that is, towards the head of the guitar.) This way, instead of the fleshy underside of my finger contacting the guitar, and muting the strings slightly, also leading to buzzing in many cases, I could use the harder, ...


3

Lowering the guitar a tone and adding a capo is how I play my guitar now most of the time. Partly to make chords like F more accessible and partly to play with looser strings. You are right in your thinking about the capo making the action lower, and making chords easier to reach and play. I could suggest playing the F chord slighly differently by trying ...


3

Arpeggios generally start on the root, then sequentially play 3,5,8 and so on. Guitars can be used to play these, but they don't always relate exactly to chord shapes. Take a simple E maj. chord, and you find that it leaves out the major 3rd note that you'd play in the arpeggio on the 6th string 4th fret. O.k. the rest of the notes follow well, but the two ...


3

First, there's tradition ... from your Uncle Joe who played bluegrass with the boys for barn dances every Saturday night (or maybe his name was Bill and he covered CCR tunes in the local bars with his buddies) to popular teachers such as Mel Bay and the like. For years guitar method books would teach G, C, and D7 and then tell you that "anybody can play ...


3

Fret wraps (or hair bands, basically anything that can wrap around a fretboard and mute the strings) are used to mute the open strings while performing a tapping passage. They are placed around the strings near the nut of the instrument to prevent the open strings from sounding. This limits the use of open strings during performance. A sponge mute can also ...


3

This question is missing a lot of context. It may be that there is no difference, or it may be that the bass line is played on a bass guitar, or there may be the root note of the chord (which may or may not be 'bass') played on any string (although realistically strings 1 to 4 in order to have two other notes of the chord on strings 5 and 6) There is no ...


3

If the strings are properly in place, my guess is that the string is either too tight or too loose. So, instead of the usual E that it's supposed to be, you see a B. Just tune it until it gets to E. Just make sure to understand if you have to loosen it or tighten it. It might help you to find someone who knows how to properly tune a guitar so as to show you....


3

Take no notice. Press on as you are. There have been plenty of remarkable guitar players who have found stranger ways to play. You sound like you want to play despite having found problems doing it in the 'conventional' way. Good for you. People rest the guitar on their laps and play that way (which I feel is actually more productive, once one's accustomed),...


3

I own a Traveler too, although a different model, but no, different strings won't do what you need. Not sure how that video was produced, but any electric guitar will need an amp for any sort of amplitude. While product suggestions are off-topic in this forum, you may want to consider a headphone amp or similar. When I travel, I use a Vox headphone amp - I'...


3

This is almost entirely down to tradition - early guitars used similar construction to equivalent instruments - lutes, violins etc all had that slot mechanism for the tuning pegs, where you have a slightly tapered tuning peg that is pushed into the hole to tighten. Obviously, with more recent technology, tuning pegs with worm gear mechanism have removed the ...


2

This could be a hardware driver problem. Do you have up to date drivers from your hardware. Also look at updating your video drivers as they can sometimes have an effect on your sound (as strange as that sounds).


2

I basically never play barre chords this way (full barre with the first finger) ...for the same reason you found - it is difficult to barre across all six strings without buzzing, especially if you don't use light strings, low action etc. If you think about it mechanically, it is quite inefficient to need all this strength in the first finger, when it's ...



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