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21

I leave all ten of my acoustic guitars tuned all the time. In most cases it is not a problem to leave your guitar under the full tension of standard tuning for days or even weeks at a time. However, if you know you will be storing a guitar for an extended period of time (months) without playing it or changing the strings, it is probably a good idea to ...


15

Imagine what chaos there would be in a guitar shop close to closing time every day! And even worse at opening time! Just smile sweetly at your friend, and let him carry on wrecking his guitar and wasting his time, but realise that actually you know far better and leave your guitar in tune for the next day. I've done it with about 20+ guitars for 50+ years, ...


10

Guitar (just acoustic guitar for now) is one of those instruments where different constructions, setups and playing characteristics (slide guitar and so on) means having several guitars can be useful. Going a little off topic, electric guitar is even worse - different pickup models, "tremolo" (i.e. vibrato) devices, neck and body constructions, extended ...


8

The term is "skanking" (a la the Marley song "Easy Skanking"), and it's also part of other Jamaican music, such as Ska. You are correct that it's about the high strings. When I've done it, it's been more about muting by releasing tension in the chording hand, rather than with the palm of the picking hand. The picking hand stays loose, keeping with the ...


8

I know it as the "skank", though other names are used (see the link). I think it would be reasonable to say "The guitarist skanks on that song" for example.


8

You will have a very small amount of extra wear and tear on that machine head and the groove in the nut that string passes through, but aside from that this should cause no damage to an acoustic or electric guitar. The change in tension on the neck from that one shift is not significant, in fact you can get a greater change from atmospheric conditions. So ...


6

Most players probably don't play full chords above 12th fret; however, you could try using fewer fingers, as in for an E shaped chord, using one finger on 5th and 4th strings, similarly on A shaped chords, play with 2 or 3 fingers - a barre over all 6, and a mini barre over 4,3 and 2. Just playing 3 or 4 notes out of particular chords works well, too, as ...


5

Leave it tuned, not only will the strings thank you for allowing them to 'settle in' to their proper tension (think of repeatedly bending a coat-hanger to break it) but the machine head gears will also not suffer as much slippage in the long run. The wood and glue is also better off staying under tension. The only time where all the strings should be ...


5

The short answer is - DO NOT give up on playing guitar just because your fingers aren't optimally configured. You can adapt and learn to play quite well - if you really want to! Unfortunately not all of us who aspire to learn to play guitar are blessed with long slender fingers. But if you have a strong desire to play, you can overcome whatever ...


4

Chord inversion simply refers to which note is in the bass (i.e., the lowest note). We start in root position with the root in the bass: for a C major chord, C is the lowest note. If we imagine a simple C-E-G triad, then we can "invert" the chord by moving the C up an octave, getting E-G-C, with E (the third) in the bass. This is first inversion. We do ...


4

The answer is to learn both. They are not exclusive of each other, and as you say, you're going to learn both eventually anyway. Both require development of your music reading skills. Spending time on the one will not detract from the study of the other. Virtually all advanced, university-level music programs require the student to have fundamental basic ...


4

I think it would be a great mistake to "forget" the alternate picking technique that you learned and start all over with economy picking. What you should probably due is two things: first, work on and improve your alternate picking technique. You definitely haven't reached the limit yet. The second thing you should do is add other techniques to your picking ...


4

Check this video out for guitar collecting taken to the extreme. To add to what Andy has said sometimes there is a matter of a having more than one guitar serves some practical purpose but often it is just simply because you can. When you come to a point where you have spent most of your life playing a guitar and now have ...


4

differing tonal qualities, with electric , also acoustic. different tunings, to save bothering retuning one. different actions, e.g. high for slide playing. with/without vibrato. different styles for different genres. different strings, maybe light to bend, heavy for other reasons. different no. of strings - 6/7. investment - would you gig with a ...


3

I agree with @MattPutnam's answer as far as chord inversions and close/open voicings are concerned, but I'd like to add an explanation of what drop voicings are. First of all, there are no "drop 2 chords", there are only drop 2 voicings of chords. The concept of drop voicings is often applied to four part chords. A drop voicing is obtained by dropping one ...


3

Callous or no callous, be firmer with the hammer on. That's why it's called that! Try to hit the string just behind the fret wire, not in the middle of the fret, and keep the finger pressed down after contacting the string. Callouses probably make little difference, but having played for years, I don't have any. If you have, maybe the action has taken its ...


3

You shouldn't have to either hammer on or pull off. This pattern can be played with thumb=>6th string, index=>4th, middle=>3rd, ring=>2nd, and using these fingers to pluck the notes that occur on those strings. Using p,i,m,a for thumb, index, middle and ring fingers respectively the plucking would go something like: | <p&m> i p m i ...


3

This will not hurt the guitar, especially since you're only adjusting one string. Even with more general tuning changes, e.g. changes to open D, you won't hurt the guitar; the worst side-effect might be sub-optimal neck relief. Re-tuning will tend to wear the strings more; causing them to break more easily, but I've noticed this more on the thinner ...


3

Since you're only loosening one string, and for a short while, no harm in that. The other strings may change their tuning slightly in the process, but that's o.k. Those DGs are good guitars, but consider keeping it, and having two when you upgrade - one standard, one D-tuned. Yes, on electrics, it's the same, except those vibrato-equipped will probably have ...


3

Do exercises for both left and right hand. Exercises for pickig hand 16th notes as fast as you can on G string 5th fret. Start with 120bpm and raise by 10 Play triplets on the open strings, moving from low E to high E string. Start at 80bpm Same triplets, but with string skipping. From string 6(low E) to 4, then 5 to 3, 4 to 2, 3 to 1 and back to low E. ...


3

Yes you can leave your guitar tuned over night and it is what most if not all guitarist do. The neck of your guitar should be able to take being in tune for a period of time and the tension put on it and if not, there are more serious issues with your guitar.


3

Could be a few things to look at, with the best/most likely at the top Finger and hand positions, experiment with different techniques until you find a perfect hand position/shape for EVERY chord you are getting bum notes with that reduces the chances of a bad sound, trying alternate places and or missing out notes to get a chord that sounds best Have ...


3

There are three parts to playing a note. One - press down string onto fret. Two - release pressure and three - take finger off string. Do this really slowly, and you will hear when the problem occurs. It will usually be the last part. Your fingertip will be making the open string vibrate, in one of two ways. Either because it is stuck slightly to the string, ...


3

The Bm chord has the note D as its third, so you aren't in the key of C# minor, but in the key of F# minor. So your progression is actually: || F#sus2 | C#m | Bm | Esus2 || The reason why the C# minor pentatonic scale works is because it is (also) a subset of the F# (natural) minor scale, which is the basic scale fitting all 4 chords of your progression.


2

A technique advocated by Steve Vai on this one is to pick up some sheet music books for other instruments, especially violin. Being a hardy Scot I'd recommend some fiddle tunes, but that's up to you ;) A book specific to guitar that I've found great for sight-reading practice is Harmony for Guitar. Sight reading isn't the direct focus of the book, but all ...


2

@MattPutnam suggested that it could be telling you to keep the 4th finger on that note. Alternate editions don't include that line, so it's probably not anything musical or interpretive in the original score. I'd agree with him that it's just to remind you that the 4th finger doesn't need to move.


2

I often, though not always, find a difference in the quality of sound between new and old strings because of the age of the strings. I usually change them all when one single string breaks, for this reason. Some brands have a different quality of metal, or nylon, but for the most part the quality is consistent across brands. I have a negative opinion of ...


2

There's one major concept missing from this discussion: What are your ears hearing you play over this blues progression? When you play/practice this blues are you able to hear a melody or theme that you would like to be able to play from your instrument? If not, who do you listen to that would play what you want to hear? Understanding scales and their ...


2

Count in the smallest note value to get a good idea of the rhythm. Make semi quavers one beat. Crotchets 4 beats and dotted quavers 3 beats and regular quavers two beats.


2

It's not just about making the action higher or lower...it's also about getting the proper relief in the neck. The neck of a guitar isn't ruler-straight: it bends upward in a very slight gradual curve from the body to the headstock. If that curve is too flat you'll get pernicious buzzing, and if it's too fat you'll have strings too high and possibly ...



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