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20

Yes. You can use a spider capo for this kind of things. Generally, it is used for alternate tunings. Like if you only want to capo 2 or 3 strings, but you can capo all 6 of them and then remove all of them. Here is a video review: ...


9

This is actually a really nice way to notate guitar. The chord symbol on top tells you what chord to play for the bar, and the tab itself is just indicating the arpeggio pattern. So for example, in the first full bar, you finger a x32010 C major chord, then play the strings indicated as eighth notes (which are indicated by the eighth note beams). Then ...


7

String sets are labeled according to the gauge of the strings. "Gauge" refers to the diameter of each string, measured in decimal fractions of an English inch or in fractions of millimeters. Even in countries that use the metric system, it is still common to refer to guitar string gauges in decimal fractions of an English inch. When we say a "set of 10s" ...


5

Back in the early '60s, there was only a 'standard' set available, so take it or leave it. Then guitarists started using banjo strings, and putting a 2nd in place of a 3rd, etc. Since then, string makers have given us a huge choice in gauges. 'Standard' most likely means a set of .010s,which seems to be what a lot of manufacturers put on new, but some ...


5

This first part applies to all the string instruments, not just the guitar. Most people that play guitar/bass/double bass etc learn the certain shapes that each scales consist of. This has a great benefit: you can easily transpose to any other key. For instance, if you know the shape for a major scale, and you practice it in C major, you can easily go to ...


5

I commend you on your desire to learn to play guitar. It is a very versatile instrument and can provide a lifetime of enjoyment at any proficiency level. But it is not the easiest instrument to learn to play because of the need to train your brain to get your hands and fingers to contort in very un-natural positions, not to mention tender fingertips ...


5

It can depend on a couple of factors; amongst them, how good your ear is & how accurately the guitar is set up. The method that removes the most drift would be to tune each string to a played note on a piano or against a tuner. That way any inaccuracy would not be exacerbated as you move down the strings. If you tune by fretting one string & ...


5

Since you are a beginner, I would strongly suggest you start with an electronic tuner. Take one and tune you guitar and then see how it's supposed to sound when it's tuned correctly. Play the natural harmonics over the 5th and the 7th frets and listen to the correct sound. Or, you can try playing the 5th fret and the open string below (these are supposed to ...


4

The mainstay chords for most standard pop songs are I, IV and V. The minors are sometimes used - ii, iii and vi. The 7th chord, a dim., isn't put into a lot of songs. All these start as triads, and can have extra notes played with those 3. The most common is a 7th, although 9ths, sus 2 and 4, and 6ths work well. Alongside those are chords from the parallel ...


4

I have great news for you! There are sooooo many tools readily available with a simple Google search. I suggest musictheory.net, but there are so many options if you look for ear training exercises. Here's a real tough exercise that I used to do for my musicianship class: Give yourself a starting pitch. Sing up a Perfect 5th Sing down a tri-tone ...


4

While either are correct, there are subtle differences for each fingering that can be taken advantage of especially when going from power chord to barre chord. You can and should take advantage of the different types of fingerings. The 1,3,4 fingering for power chords let's you take advantage of the E major, E minor, A minor, D major, and D minor shaped ...


4

Generally, it's good to practice everything everywhere. This helps you get to know the instrument you're playing better (this doesn't apply only to guitar) and helps you learn how to transpose the songs. But, if you still cannot play a song in a certain key, there isn't much point in transposing it. It might help if you transposed it into something that had ...


4

Even though Shevliaskovic's suggestion that this could be an Em9 (no 5) chord is theoretically correct, it is hardly ever used that way. If that voicing were used as an Em9 chord there would be no reason to indicate that the low E string should be muted (note the cross on the low E string). With the note D in the bass, the Em9 chord would have its seventh in ...


4

Normally that sound should not be picked up by the pickup. That being said, you should try muting it with left hand fingers "behind" the fretting finger, assuming you're not hammering on with the first finger. If you are hammering on with the first finger, I'm not sure what to do beside try to change the fingering somehow so you are hammering on with a ...


4

Try to concentrate the “hammer energy” on the bridge-side fret. The finger should always be rather closer to that fret, not in the middle between two frets; for a hammer-on it can be a good idea to actually aim right on top of the fret you want, and only then pull the finger back a bit to avoid damping the note.


4

This tends to happen when there is no dampening on the nut side of the fretboard; for instance, if you're hammering on from an open string. Generally speaking, when you're performing a hammer-on, the finger on the lower fret remains pressed down while your other finger hits your target fret. This tends to be more common on acoustic guitars where the proper ...


3

Yeah, Frank Gambale! I listened to the first vid and was like, "wow, this guy would love Gambale..." lol. So, getting more specific and answering your (admittedly) very broad question: Harmony/Changes These guys are playing with the changes. That's because this isn't really pure "funk"(), it's fusion, which is really jazz with a rock beat (IMHO, don't ...


3

Slide it, Man! In your "impossible" transition, I'm assuming you are already fingering an open A chord. The 2,3 and 4 fingers are in the same position as the B chord, right? Just two frets down (toward the nut). So, just leave them in position and "slide" them up to fret 4, then as they come into position plop your index finger for the barre. This will ...


3

Half position in reference to a barre chord using one finger to bar 2-5 notes instead of all 6 strings. There's a lot of chords that don't to be fully barred. Simple example is there is a "mini" version of the typical F chord that is: %X/X.X/X.3/3.2/2.1/1.1/1[F] Notice only two notes are barred so you are in half position. The distinction is made so you ...


3

I'm used to the first couple frets being sharp so I'm not sure why yours are flat, but otherwise it's very common. It's pretty much impossible for a fretted instrument to have perfect intonation - it's always a compromise. Since it's an electric guitar, you can individually adjust the intonation of each string any time you want. This is done at the bridge ...


3

You should go to a professional guitar repair technician or luthier. They can look at it and give you a quick assessment of what is probably wrong for no charge. I would guess that the nut of the guitar, and the string slots, are cut wrong. Modifying the nut and fret slots, or replacing the nut entirely and then hand-cutting the fret slots, is not a very ...


3

For rock blues and metal styles (thumb up top) the only time you should barre is with power chords with the root on the G string (144). All other 3 note power chords are 134 with the exception of the sixth string root which may be T34.or 134. Which is a matter of preference. The important part is muting the unplayed strings. The index finger must mute any ...


3

Like with anything else, barre chords take time to play properly. I bet that your 1st finger isn't strong enough to correctly bar the 2nd fret all the way. I suggest figuring out where your limit is (where you can actually play an A shaped barre chord) and try switching to and from it to get use to it. A viable option if you need to play this progression ...


3

A couple of points. You don't have to leave out the bottom string. It can still be barred and played on the 2nd fret. You don't have to use three fingers for the strings 2,3 and 4. Obviously, 3 can be used, but you could make do with 2 or even 1, sort of 'barred' across the 3 strings, bent up so that the 1st string still sounds. B7 would work, although you ...


3

Check out the Frank Mantooth book Voicings for Jazz keyboard. He gives some excellent worked examples, and the section on fractional dominant chords is an eye opener. That chapter alone lets you voice II-V-I progressions with gorgeous voicings for the V chord. Use this book to spell chords so they don't sound triadic and twee - but instead sound quartal and ...


3

It's 40 plus years since I played electric with a wound 3rd, but a plain is easier to bend. The core isn't the be-all and end-all, as tension is less in a plain string. The 3rd is a string that gets used a lot in bends, also, a plain is slightly better to slide up or down a fret or two. As mentioned in another answer, we used to use banjo strings or a second ...


3

I'd read it like this: Make the chord like the first line says. Then the x's tell you which string to play, starting from the 6th string in the bottom to the 1st in the top. The bars uniting the notes are to give you the tempo of these notes. The numbers on the top of the bars are a mistery to me.


3

Conveniently, guitars are set up so major scales can be played using all four fingers on four consecutive frets, to play two octaves. Minor scales can be played similarly, with only one slip down a fret on the 3rd string. All this assumes you start on the bottom string, and work up to the same fret on the top. The obvious (ubiquitous?) scales that work well ...


3

Unless the chord is notated as B/F# you really don't need to worry about the 6th string (fret 2 = F#) which can (or maybe should?) be omitted from the chord. The most important note to fret cleanly is the D# on the 2nd string fret 4 because it is the only note that is not doubled. Even if you only play the 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings fretted at the 4th fret ...


3

If you want to learn how to do your own setup on acoustic and electric guitars, you should not rely on a random collection of videos you find on YouTube. This is not going to give you a comprehensive answer. If you want a "detailed description of how to do these", you should purchase a textbook on guitar setup and repair, and study it. The textbook will ...



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