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9

Twelve string guitars have basic tuning the same as a 6 string (EADGBE) but the pairs are arranged a little differently: For the thickest 4 pairs (EADG) the thinner string of each pair should be an octave higher than the thicker string For the thinnest two pairs (BE) each string of the pair should be tuned in unison. There is a handy tuner online at ...


8

That is in fact a stretch but perhaps not impossible - even for small hands. One thing you must be sure you are doing is correctly positioning your fretting hand on the neck for that type progression involving a maximum stretch. You will probably find it easier to make the stretch if you position your thumb near the center of the back of the neck and ...


7

In general on guitar you have a lot of options about where you can play something. Take advantage of being able to play the same thing on other strings. Instead of just using the A and D string like you are currently doing, you can do this: G - 8 9 8 - D 9 x x x 9 A 7 7 7 7 7 You also have the option of instead of playing it on ...


7

As already said, mic-preamp clipping cannot possibly be an issue if you use any amp that's legal to operate without a strategic weapons license, and the sound guys know what they're doing. I would add three possible things to joseem's list, that might be the real issue: The sound guys were using the same channel for different purposes (e.g. before you for ...


6

Wow. If you are actually going to make a guitar then I must say that is quite challenging. I have a friend who is a woodworker who tried to make several guitars - but they just did not work out so well. Here is what I can share about volume as it relates to guitars. Let's start with an acoustic guitar (no electronics to amplify the sound). An ...


6

All new strings need a good stretch to allow them to bed in. The metal itself has to stretch a little, the windings round the post have to settle and the neck has to re-adjust to the tension change. Along each string, pull and push, but not like you'd pull a bow (and arrow). Lift up and push down a couple of inches away from each other - it's not easy to ...


6

Many (most?, all?) musicians go through phases like this, for some people they'll just recur, and you need to accept it. The stereotype of the tortured artist exists for a reason. If you're doing music for your own enjoyment, and aren't enjoying it then stop. Take a long walk, do some gardening, read or write a book. Take a day, a week, or more, off. ...


6

Get better sound guys. Clipping is an electronic phenomenon when the input signal is too hot for the circuitry, so the tops and bottoms of the waveform are getting shaved off. (This is bad because speakers don't like constant voltages at anything other than 0V.) Microphone signals are far below the line level that the mixer is operating on, so the only way ...


5

Clipping in this situation could be caused by: 1) the microphone not being the most appropriate to the task at hand, and not being able to capture your audio without, well, clipping. Positioning the mike further away from the amp could possibly lead to some working solution, but could bring other problems, like capturing other sources or ruining your sound ...


5

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


4

The usual way to smooth out note changes on guitar is to play legato. This means using techniques such as sliding from one note to another (on the same string, obviously), hammering on and pulling off notes, or bending strings - not too effective on nylon strung guitars. For the pizz. parts, you could try palm muting, which works, as all I've suggested, ...


4

I'll borrow the arpeggio definition from wikipedia: An arpeggio (Italian: [arˈpeddʒo]) is a musical technique where notes in a chord are played or sung in sequence, one after the other, rather than ringing out simultaneously. So, let's say you have the C major chord, which consists of the notes C-E-G. If you play these 3 notes together, they will form ...


4

I play banjo which has almost no sustain and it's hard to get a good legato sound, so I'll often just adjust the arrangement to play multiple shorter notes, like 8 eighth notes in place of a whole note (which sounds on banjo like an eighth note followed by a long rest). If you do it tastefully it will carry its part and support the pulse or rhythm of the ...


4

As you detune strings, they start to get "floppy" and the guitar becomes hard to play well. To prevent those problems, you can use thicker strings, a longer scale length, or both. At some point, the strings become so thick that you need to widen the nut slots or else the strings won't sit in them correctly. You also may find that you need a higher action and ...


4

It's because you can start/continue the the pattern on any of the notes of the pentatonic scale. The collection of notes you have will always be the same, but the exact pattern of the scale will be different. Let's look at the E minor pentatonic scale to start with. In the E minor penatonic scale you have the following notes with the following intervals: ...


4

I use and teach both ways. Tend to use the three fingers on the wider frets, and change to the one finger + barre version when the frets are too narrow - around 5/6. The ring finger HAS to bend backwards, so as to allow the top string to sound. There are a couple of other ways, though, using two fingers to cover the 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings. Looking at your ...


3

From my perspective, which is less theory and more practice, I would always try and approach this chords first. Listen to the rhythm guitarist. On the run up to the solo and then all the way through the solo, the rhythm guitarist (or keyboard or whatever) will be providing you with all the chords so you don't need to guess what the soloist is playing from. ...


3

Tuning a guitar lower than standard will certainly impart a darker, heavier sound. That's the reason many metal bands seem to employ various type drop tunings. A standard scale 6 string guitar (25-1/2" or 24-3/4") tuned down an octave (or tuned down to F# below the standard low E) would not be very practical to play in a typical guitar playing sort of ...


3

Strictly speaking an arpeggio is played in strict note order like a scale, but more informally people use it to describe playing a chord in a broken order rather than all at once. With guitar you can hold a chord and play the notes(strings) in any order and it should sound reasonably ok. All the notes will harmonise. You want to allow the strings to carry ...


3

This bright sound (it needn't be short) is called "harmonics", and it can be produced by putting a finger lightly on a nodal point of an open string- that is, some small fraction of the length (a half, a third, a quarter...) and plucking that string. This will result in a note an octave higher than the open string (if you touch the string halfway), an ...


3

They're harmonics, but they don't HAVE to be from open strings, (these examples are), although they're the easiest to produce. Best sounding when plucked very close to the bridge. If a string is fretted, you can use the thumb at the node (any of them) and pluck the note, usually with your pick. They're called pinched harmonics, and are most often heard on ...


3

I have a similar background, and in my experience, there simply isn't a good transition or analog from piano to guitar. Whereas a child can learn to identify every B-flat on the piano in an afternoon, it takes weeks or months of practice to know the notes on the fretboard. It's an entirely different system. I would like to suggest a few approaches / ideas I ...


2

One option is of course to actually use a bow - this can be used to great effect. Alternatively, the difference between a pick (or fingernails) and using the soft pads of your fingers to pick with can be accentuated by moving your right hand from near the bridge using a pick (sharp attack, more high harmonics, staccato sounds) towards the 12th fret when ...


2

Without seeing the piece involved... As an alternative to the above answers, I would suggest a drop-tuning with a glass or metal slide. It'll require a bit more work in terms of knowing what notes to hit when playing pizzicato, but doable (depending on the chords involved, of course). Another alternative is to restring the guitar with flat-wound strings, ...


2

Excellent explanation by Rockin Cowboy. On a purely pratical side I would add that volume is a sound property that can be easily measured, at least on relative terms. A number of free APPs for mobile phones are available that measure the sourrounding sound intensity. These are not professional tools, of course, but provide a good enough comparison of ...


2

And... And string "action" - higher action is louder. And the angle at which the string attaches to the body (as in Millenial style guitars) - a greater angle is louder. And the place at which you pluck the strings - this varies (by guitar and by individual string) but the string is usually louder near the double-octave harmonic next to the sound hole. And ...


2

As an addition to Tim's answer, the two most common guitar voicings for dominant seventh chords with the fifth omitted and the root as the lowest note are (e.g., for C7, from low to high E string): 8 X 8 9 X X and X 3 2 3 X X Since you mute three out of the six strings, these shapes can be shifted. They are very common in a blues and jazz context. They ...


2

The fifth of a chord can safely be dropped in any inversion. The fifth of a chord (perfect fifth) is always going to be the same note in reference to the root. Thus, root=A, means P5=E. It can't matter when there is a different voicing, as P5 will always be the same note in the same key. It has been said of a dominant chord on guitar that the 3 (C#) and b7 ...


2

"bis" is just Latin for "twice", it's a pretty common expression in romance language countries, not so much in other ones, I guess. I had never seen it in tablatures before, but I suppose the meaning should be to repeat the previous segment.


2

I have three tips for you, and the third one works for most people with smaller hands: As a final goal, try to play that riff in the seventh position, as you've tabbed it out. All other theoretically possible options won't give you the right sound. This is an important standard riff that is worth to learn well. As an exercise, play the same riff a few ...



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