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24

Yep, the second one is far better for precisely the reason you say. A general rule is that you shouldn't have dotted-notes that start on an off beat and carry through the next beat. There are exceptions even to this rule, but showing the underlying beat structure of the meter is paramount in the vast majority of situations. Elliott Carter is an example of ...


16

It is called a scalloped fingerboard. It is used by lead guitarists who do a great deal of string-bending when playing melodies. And yes, playing one effectively requires a certain technique, because if one uses too much finger pressure, the notes and chords go way out of tune. Here is a page at Warmoth Custom Guitar Parts where they explain different kinds ...


13

Wrist pain may be "normal" in the sense that many players encounter it at some point. But it is not "normal' in the sense that you should ignore it. I have seen injuries take down some very talented and able people. If you experience pain and discomfort, especially at times when you are not playing, then you should consult with a doctor, not other guitar ...


12

Technically speaking two notes with the same pitch have the same frequency as the fundamental. However this does not explain why two notes of the same frequency also called unisons, sound different on strings of different diameters or lengths or both. The guitar and the entire orchestra string family as you may know have numerous unisons (unlike the piano). ...


9

This depends upon what you mean by "music is in the key of…" and "I want to play it in the key of…". If you mean that you want to play chords written in the key of C and have them sound in the key of Eb, put the capo on fret 3. Eb is three semitones higher than C (C-C#-D-Eb). (This seems likely.) If you want to play chords written in the key of Eb and have ...


8

If you are referring strictly to music written obeying to traditional rhythmic conventions (with rational time signatures and regular/even division), then your second example is more suitable. Please keep in mind that the first example is not wrong, but the second will make sight-reading much easier, as our own expectations when seeing a piece in 4/4 make us ...


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


6

I am not an expert in anatomy, but I believe this is because the picky and ring finger are connected to each other by the superficial ulnar nerve, whereas the remaining fingers are connected by branches of the deep ulnar nerve. The good news is, despite the fact that your pinky and ring finger seem less independent, this is not permanent. It's normal for ...


6

Although your question is a little ambiguous, I'm guessing that you want to play music written in Eb, using chords in C, but keeping the music sounding in Eb. So, you put the capo on fret 3 and rewrite all your chords three semitones lower. However, just giving you this answer won't help you understand how to work out where to put a capo should you need to ...


6

The most correct notation for a C7 chord would be C E G Bb and not C E G A#. Note that both Bb and A# are practically the same, but A is the 6th of C whereas B is the 7th of C. Those notes that sound the same but are written different are called Enharmonic notes. So, if you had a chord with these notes: C E A#, then that would be a C augmented sixth chord, ...


5

@Grey's answer is good. I have had similar problems in the past, which caused me to get some repetitive stress injury in my wrist and get ganglions on the back of my left hand as well as carpal tunnel syndrome. I'm no doctor but the solution, for me, was to change my technique so that my left wrist was straight at all times when I played. This meant: I ...


5

The Roland VG pedal boards will change your guitar tuning to whatever your little heart desires. Joni Mitchell used to use one for her 50+ different guitar tunings. (Source: http://www.jonimitchell.com/library/view.cfm?id=38) The Roland VGs require a GK hexaphonic pickup that picks up up each string separately. More info here: ...


5

There are many things to consider when buying any guitar. Here are my important factors: price action/playability construction materials sound when plugged in sound when unplugged (I play almost always plugged in, so this is less important) Takamine have a great range of cheap guitars that sound amazing and have great playability. Check out the D series. ...


5

Here's a common chart showing how the notes break down: Notice how each row is a full measure in 4/4. The general rule is that a note can span its direct children, or one of its children and one of its nephews. That is, a quarter note can span the 2nd and 3rd eighth notes, but not the 4th and 5th. A dotted note can only borrow from its sibling, not its ...


5

All else being equal, a thicker string will damp out transverse vibrations more rapidly because it experiences more drag (inter-molecular deformation) per unit length. (See section 4.6 of [not my work] http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~djmorin/waves/transverse.pdf.) (If we consider strings made of different materials or under different tensions, this rule ...


4

The traditional solution would be to crank up the master volume to get more power amp overdrive, the only stage common to all channels. So it will of course affect the distortion channels as well, but probably not in a harmful way. However, it of course means you'll be much louder overall1. Really, that Clean channel seems to be meant to have such a sound ...


4

The classical guitar has nylon strings, like the ukulele. Maybe your husband would enjoy playing classical guitar rather than steel-string guitar.


4

A wooden instrument is ideally kept at about 40-60% humidity, so 45% is fabulous. This range is supposed to produce the best sound, and the least stress on the wood. But the absolute worst thing you can do is change up the humidity frquently and quickly, because this put stress on the wood and the seams. So if your instruments spend hours a day outdoors, ...


4

If you're playing this style, I would suggest that instead of looking for a list of Freddie Green chords, you should procedurally construct all drop 2 chords using string set 6543. Freddie Green chords are merely drop2 chords on strings 6543, but with the note on string 5 always omitted to leave a little bit of space for the rest of the ensemble. (Straw ...


4

This notation is a simplified notation of regular scores. It does not show whether you need to strum up or down -- that's something you'll just have to decide for yourself, judging on what feels best and what sounds best -- instead it shows the rhythm of your strumming. This website has an easy-to-understand list of what each symbol means, so take a look at ...


4

Wood "lives". Certainly the sound of a wooden instrument can change over time. Most obvious, if the wood wasn't expertly selected and dried there's a high danger of deforming later, this will usually make the instrument worse overall. To some degree this can happen even in a good instrument if it's stored at extreme humidity or temperature conditions, again ...


4

Swap a string by putting your top string in place of the second. If you take it off carefully and put it onto the second post, and wind it more times, it can still go back on properly, although a new set of strings isn't extortionate. If this string is still quiet, it's the pick-up, although it's doubtful all three have the same problem. More likely it's ...


3

There have been several similar questions here. I recommend lighter gauge strings, which will not be so tight. Ones for electric guitar will do, but you need to establish what gauge is on already. Them drop by a couple of sizes - if originals are 011s, go to 009s.There may also be an issue with the action of the guitar, causing the strings to need pressing ...


3

Well, guitar necks are designed to bear a certain amount of tension and strings which don't provide that tension will likely cause the instrument to become warped. Having said that, classical guitars (which are a different style of guitar designed for different strings) use strings similar to the ones on your ukelele, although the bass strings are wound, ...


3

Seems to be in G minor, with the slightly odd sounding 4th fret 4th string note being the leading note (F#), part of a D chord, the V of Gm. The reason you thought D was that the first note is indeed a D. There are many pieces of music that do not use the key note to start. Most will use it to finish.As this actually does ! So the key's G minor, but that ...


3

With tabs you need to know some theory first on how to determine the key by the chord progression. A quick and simple way to do this is to find the first and/or last chord of the song. But learn I - IV - V twelve bar blues and how to solo with pentatonics first before hitting the modes. You need to understand basic theory before you get into anything beyond ...


3

In the long run, try not to worry too much about this problem. It is normal that your skin ends up being damaged by your strings. However, once your skin heals, it will be stronger/thicker than it was before. This means that patience is the best long term solution. The natural process of letting your skin heal is more important than the mitigation of a few ...


3

tl;dr: This is gonna be a lengthy one :-) My suggestion My suggestion would be to start with the pentatonic aeolean (minor) pattern over the whole fretboard - the most natural one on the guitar would be the A minor scale or E minor also aligns pretty nice with the tuning and the markers. My approach is to get used to the basic fret positions and then ...


3

Difficult to pinpoint without actually seeing what is going on. However, it may be the angle of the guitar, both vertically and horizontally, making the fretting wrist strain more than needed. It may be the action is too high, strings too heavy, that means you're having to press harder than necessary to get clean notes. It may be that you simply are pressing ...


3

Have you looked at the Fender website? CD-100CE; and CD-60CE. There are only three differences, according to the Specs tab: The 100 has mahogany back and sides, whereas the 60 is nato; The 100 has a satin finish to the body and neck, whereas the 60's is gloss; and The 100 has a rosewood headstock veneer, which the 60 doesn't.



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