Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Technically speaking two notes with the same pitch have the same frequency as the fundamental. However this does not explain why two notes of the same frequency also called unisons, sound different on strings of different diameters or lengths or both. The guitar and the entire orchestra string family as you may know have numerous unisons (unlike the piano). ...


10

The strings are under tension via the machine heads. There is often a bit of slack in the gears. By tuning straight down to D, the slack isn't taken up. By going a bit further down, then coming back up to D, the slack is taken out. Also, the strings are being loosened, and need to go too loose, then tightened up to pitch. Some guitars may not have a problem, ...


9

Theory is just that - theory. It ain't law. The 'rules' don't have to be adhered to necessarily. Obvious in this (and many, many other) case(s). If it needs pigeon-holing, it could be explained that it isn't only in full minor, whatever that may be, but has slipped into mode. Dorian mode, as it happens. This mode sounds quite minor, but has its 4th chord as ...


8

Plucking a string increases its tension momentarily. This tension drops rapidly as the vibration dies out. This causes the pitch to drop slightly as the string vibrates. It's an inherent limitation of plucked string instruments but it's OK, it's part of the sound we know and love. Also, unlike the ideal mathematical model, strings vibrate in two dimensions. ...


8

Strings gauged at 0.011 and 0.012 differ in diameter by 0.001 inches. Strings for guitar are usually sold in sets and named after the lightest string in the set, so the implication is that, in a set of "elevens", all the strings will be thinner than the corresponding strings in a set of "twelves". Different manufacturers have different combinations with ...


7

Not the easiest of questions to try to answer, but - exams have always been a way to determine this kind of level. In essence, someone on, say, grade V on any instrument could be construed as as advanced as another who has grade V. Especially if it's on the same instrument. However, there are various different styles of guitar, and playing.This has been ...


6

There's lots of ways to do it! No single way is necessarily the right way. Your progression certainly works, and you're right that preceding the Am chord with its dominant (either an E or an E7) is the best way to strengthen the effect of Am being the new home key. You can actually follow the E (or E7) chord with either an A minor (A, C, E) or an A major (A, ...


5

In my experience, a vocal arrangement or piano arrangement might be your best bet. Guitar is a C instrument so you should be able to follow any of the chord progressions outlined in a piano arrangement. You might have to actually buy the sheet music, though. Vocal Arrangement: Usually for a vocal arrangement the chords are specified as to facilitate a ...


5

For acoustic style (nylon string or steel string) there is also the possibility of buying a silent guitar. Such guitars create the same output volume as electric guitars when not plugged in.


5

All else being equal, a thicker string will damp out transverse vibrations more rapidly because it experiences more drag (inter-molecular deformation) per unit length. (See section 4.6 of [not my work] http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~djmorin/waves/transverse.pdf.) (If we consider strings made of different materials or under different tensions, this rule ...


5

I'm sorry, I can't find the quote, it's pre-WWW. But I think it was in an interview in "Guitar Player," that Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones once replied to some flattery by saying that he was only an intermediate guitar player. Because he was better than a lot of guitar players but a lot of guitar players were better than him. So I'd go with ...


5

There are Nashville strings intended for similar usage. Other manufacturers than D'Addario likely has similar strings. You want two octaves higher on the E and A though, so it seems making your own set like Tim suggests is the way to go in this specific case.


5

Given that the bottom E and A are two octaves higher,a .010 and .007 will tune to that. The middle two, one octave higher, will need .014 and .008, and the top two, as standard can be .012 and .010. All I've done is calculate each string as a close approximation to a standard open guitar string, given its open pitch. These can be changed by about 10% either ...


4

I think a simple solution would be to switch hands. Take a left handed guitar* and play like that. The two webbed fingers won't be an issue if you use them to hold a pick. If you've never learned guitar before, it would be easier to learn to play a left handed guitar. If you had gotten used to playing the guitar, changing to a left handed guitar would be a ...


4

First, accept that you have a handicap and will never be able to play guitar 'normally'. Embrace it, don't try to play like everyone else, and you'll be a far better guitarist for it. I would recommend learning to play with alternative tunings, especially open tunings or all 5ths. It will make many chord fingerings far more simple for getting started, and ...


4

This is a technique in compositional music called Borrowed Chords. In "traditional" music, you would have only 6 chords (3 majors and 3 minors) to use in a song. However, some composers became creative and tried to use other chords from outside the scale. Using Borrowed Chords is one way of using them. When you use Borrowed Chord, you essentially change ...


4

Several good reasons. It was tried - I tried it as a kid. In front of the guitar, the volume changed dramatically with even an inch or two of movement. It got knocked.It picked up extraneous sounds. So inside it went. Then it rattled around. The feedback was pretty well uncontrollable. Solid bodies solved a lot of the feedback problems, but that made the ...


4

I have seen and experienced similar things. This is typically indicative of a tuning machine head being broken or worn out. A lot of times the gears will wear out and slip as the tension gets too high, causing the pitch/tension to drop considerably, usually to a place that the tuning gear is capable of holding, though not a couple octaves in my experience. ...


3

If you can get an electric guitar, that'd be the easiest approach. Just play it without amplification. And you could even use headphones to make sure you could hear yourself. If you're using an acoustic, you can do a few things to muffle the sound: Put a t-shirt inside the body (inside the soundhole) to dampen it a bit. Weave cloth between the strings by ...


3

Anything BUT linear !! Troughs and peaks, more like. One can practise and play loads, and the resulting improvement may be perceived as minimal. There are times when, for whatever reason, one doesn't play for two or three weeks, yet on picking up again, one's doing things easily that a few weeks ago were difficult. There's the physical and the mental sides ...


3

Switching from classical guitar to electric is going to take some time and practice. While you may be familiar with playing a nylon-stringed guitar, not all of those skills will transfer over easily or quickly to an electric. The best advice I can give you is simple: give it time, and keep practicing. It's not quite the same as learning the guitar from ...


3

The Auto_beam_engraver does not beam over rests, bar lines, manual beams or breathing signs. The Notation Reference is quite explicit regarding the beaming across rests: "Beams must be entered manually if beams are to be extended over rests."


2

I would actually say that the opposite is true, namely, that study of music theory is what matters, and that even if you don't practice sight reading (though you probably should), it's the study of theory that will make the biggest improvement in your sight reading compared to anything else. Sight reading is a tricky thing to do, there is quite a lot of ...


2

First of all it takes a while to develop your ear and some pointed practice definitely helps. The short answer is use the tools at your disposal - usually your ear and maybe notation/tablature if you can find it for free/on the cheap. With that said it is GREAT practice to transcribe the melody by ear (Using looping software ain't cheating in my book but ...


2

The name for this technique is rasgueado.


2

Some additional details. There is a very small change in pitch due to the change in tension that occurs when the string is fretted. This change in tension varies along the neck, generally larger changes further up (away from the nut) the neck. This change is small enough that it is usually imperceptible in single note playing; however this difference does ...


2

The other two answers are true however it seems your question is about sounding a unison as opposed to replicating one sound on a different string, even though you pointed out string thickness as a possible reason for the sound you are noticing. What happens when a string vibrates is that it actually stretches from side to side or up and down depending on ...


2

A chord typically consists of 3 notes: so theoretically you only need 3 fingers (and three strings) to play a chord. But most guitars have 6 strings, so other chord notes are played twice on multiple strings. It will probably not be possible for you to learn to play guitar the most common way. I would suggest to learn how you can decompose chords into ...


2

You are probably using the wrong equipment to get a good amplified sound from your acoustic guitar. 1) You can't get a good sound by running an acoustic guitar through an amp designed for an electric guitar. Amps designed for electric guitar are designed to color the sound and add distortion (by very subtle amounts or in the extreme) and they do not ...


2

I'd advocate reading the instructions !! Yes, it's tedious, but you'll find out how to tell the effects what sort of amps you're putting them through, which way you want to route the signals, which order you would like the effects to be affected by the pedals, and other important stuff. As they're sophisticated these days, in comparison to a little single ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible