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8

The most important thing is to be able to know and see on your guitar the intervals between each scale tone and the root note. If you're able to do this then you're independent of the key and you don't necessarily need to know the name of the note that you play, as long as you know its relation to the root of the scale. So when you learn scale patterns make ...


8

C#. Because it's the same thing, shifted up a semi-tone.


8

When you fret one string, and have your fretting finger just behind the fret it is easy to make the note ring out, as you are focusing pressure on that fingertip. When you fret a barre chord, you need to be able to put that same amount of pressure on each string, in the same position, just behind the fret, and this is just difficult at first. It requires ...


6

This is a common problem, and being able to effectively damp notes after they are played is, to my ears, one of the differences between a decent amateur guitarist and someone with real control of the instrument. In fact, it is a good idea to damp notes when playing clean, too, although many players don't recognise the need until playing with distortion, ...


6

Anything that achieves the sound you're after is a valid technique! That said, a guitar (for example) out of tune with itself will usually sound a bit unpleasant to most ears. However ... If you listen to Led Zep's Black Dog, the guitars are played twice, panned left and right, and just a touch out of tune with each other. I don't know whether this is ...


5

Yes, I would recommend that course of action. Your brain and muscles don't really care whether you're doing it "right", they're just going to burn it in exactly as you're doing it. So if you are not doing well it would be best to slow down, try something easier, or take a break. You can certainly do extra while you are in the zone as well, but take care not ...


5

Don't worry so much about what the signal looks like. It will be a combination of sine waves of related and unrelated frequencies. Of more importance are: Frequency range (you want to accept roughly 200Hz to 12kHz and if the pedal produces higher harmonics eg a distortion then you may want to output up to 20kHz) Signal levels (up to about 2 Volts should ...


5

For Acoustic Guitar You probably can do a reasonable job using a keyboard amp with an acoustic guitar. You may need a pre-amp pedal (or similar) to boost the signal from your guitar in order to use it with a keyboard amp, and you may want to adjust the equalization when switching between guitar and keys, but other than that, acoustic guitars often sound ...


5

Most barre chords can be played using only the four highest strings, on either electric or acoustic. I would not label it as right or wrong to do it that way. If that is the way you choose to play the chords, then that is your decision. Perhaps there is a reason you prefer to play them that way. As an example many people choose to play the F major chord ...


5

It's not commonly used, but it's not unheard of. For instance, Simon and Garfunkels song Cecelia has a detuned guitar in it's percussive introduction. In the art world it's sometimes done in a more regimented way to produce microtonal music, which is more like intentionally tuning to a precise pitch between the notes you'd find on a keyboard. It can also ...


4

Some ups and downs. *Left-handed guitars are harder to find, and will often be more expensive, and with less choice. *If you learn to play left-handed, any chance you have to play a mate's guitar will be thwarted. *Changing strings round to make a lefty will work - but it'll need intonating again, and the body of a cutaway guitar may not work to your ...


4

Basically, yes. An amp is an essential part of a guitar's sound, tends to be overdriven somewhat (or has circuitry simulating the kind of overdrive a tube amp would show), has a single speaker with rather stiff fastenings and specific sound color covering a range up to something like 8kHz, no tweeters which would give overdrive a rather unpleasant color as ...


4

Aside from Todd's suggestion, I also recommend: Trying to play something from ear (listen to something, then try playing it without looking for the tab/score). Playing by ear is an incredibly useful skill. Try a bit of sight reading every day. Both from tab and standard/classic notation. These are both skills that may not be essential in the short term, ...


4

I admire and respect your dedication to continued improvement. One thing I have learned after many years of playing guitar is that no matter how good you get, there is always ample room for improvement. That's a good thing because it keeps the guitar fresh and interesting. I can continue to improve until I am no longer on the north side of the grass. ...


4

Start small. Although it's possible to change chord progressions and scales in a song, it sounds to me like doing so effectively is currently beyond your skill level. So, what you will want to do is pick a scale and then harmonize the chords to it, or vice-versa. The first thing you need to do is decide what key you're in; this will determine the scale ...


4

Classical (nylon strung acoustic) guitars aren't normally "sized" - they are normally all very close to the same overall dimensions. However for children or smaller players, shorter neck versions are available - 4/4 for full size, 3/4 or 1/2 or 1/4 for smaller ones. (For sizes see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_guitar) Another possibility is ...


4

A few caveats to buying sheet music: Music for "piano/guitar/voice" often does not have the complete guitar version. If you are a guitarist, look for TABs to lend a possible greater authenticity. If the music is labeled EASY or something similar, then it is unlikely to be anywhere near authentic. Some sheet music will leave out the melody, some will not. ...


4

If they are specifically for a dropped tuning, tuning up to standard might be a risk of breaking your brand new strings. Perhaps check the packaging to see if they can be used with a standard tuning. If not, don't tune them all the way up.


4

Modulation is not an effect. Modulation is the process of varying one or more properties of something, in this case the sound of a guitar. Effects are achieved through modulation (variation, change) of some property of the sound (like the phase, harmonics, frequency, amplitude, etc), but modulation itself is not an effect. This is very important to note to ...


3

Guitar amplifiers reproduce sound very well in the range of notes (frequencies) that a guitar plays, but the sound quality is relatively poor outside that range. A keyboard can play a much wider range of notes, so a keyboard amplifier needs to be good at producing a wider range of frequencies. What this means is that a good keyboard amplifier will work ...


3

Keep playing songs you like also, and more importantly make part of your routine learning new songs you like. Also I would add something 100% creative, whether it's writing a new riff or chord progression, improvising over changes, or coming up with different sounds, or even better all of the above. You shouldn't have to detune before tuning. If you have a ...


3

The letters over each bar relate to the chord that will fit with those notes. The bar saying C will work because a C major chord is made up from the 3 notes C, E and G. It may have more than one of each when played on a guitar, for instance, but will have those 3 notes, sometimes at different octaves. The notes played in that first bar are E,E,F,G so the ...


3

In addition to the two excellent answers here already, there is generally only one sort of chord which actually needs a top 4 string barre - a minor 7th, named off the top string.A basic 'E7' shape could use a barre over all four, to produce the 7th part on the D string, although with an inversion like that, it can sound quite weak. Other chords can be ...


3

Chord progressions are nice, and a lot of good songs have been made using them, but to move on to more complex patterns (or make your own progressions) you really need to learn the personalities of the different chords as well as some common transitions between chords. I'll try my best to explain it, but it is really hard ... especially on a forum. I'll ...


3

The answer is in fact "C#/G#" (a C# with a G# as the bass note). That chord can be played as an A shaped barre chord on the 4th fret (446664). But playing the progression - Am, C, E, Am, G, F, Fm, C/G a semitone higher will mean having to play all barre chords instead of the open Am, E, and G and C/G. Not sure why you would want to do that. If your ...


3

The point of thicker strings for drop C tuning is that they will end up at about the same tension as the original set at concert pitch. So the neck, bridge and belly of the guitar (and the new set of strings) are only stressed the same as they were originally. Take them up to standard at your peril!!


3

I would say that's situation dependent. Sometimes you can let the note ring and don't need to silence it. When I need a more staccato note, sometimes I lift my fretting finger just enough that the string no longer sounds (finger still in contact with string, the string just comes up off the fret). There are also situations in which I'll explicitly move a ...


2

I wouldn't say that it's wrong per se. There are many contexts where all you need is a few high notes. But it's worthwhile learning to play a full barre chord across all six strings. It opens up many more possibilities for partial chords on the lower strings, middle strings, or even split with a few muted in the middle. An electric guitar with a band of ...


2

I've been playing the guitar for 3-4 years now; I remember the same difficulty with chords: I still can't hit the open G major perfectly sometimes... You need to get used to the shapes of the chords, and practice is the only way. Then you will have difficulties with power chords. The same: practice, play a lot of these chords, and you will feel the ...


2

The white dots are typically placed at harmonic points on the string. The first harmonic of the open string is the octave, halfway along the string at the 12th fret. The second harmonic is one-third the string length, and that falls at the seventh fret. On some models, you'll see that fret marked with a double-dot as well, as it's a very prominent harmonic: ...



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