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24

The best-written summary I could find of this was on Wikipedia. Technical preliminaries (you can skip this if you don't care) All chordophones (musical instruments based on vibrating strings) can be analyzed using the same physics model of a string under tension that is fixed on both ends. The model is slightly simplified and differs from reality in two ...


15

String diameter and scale length and tension are all factors, but you are overlooking an entirely different dimension to your question. Frets. A guitar string has a fixed length, but have you noticed the frets? When you stop a string against a fret, you are then temporarily creating a shorter speaking string length. So one string on a guitar can be stopped ...


14

Tim basically has answered your question but I think this deserves larger type: Your amp is trying to kill you!!! Stop using it and get it replaced or repaired This kind of problem is most common in older amps that have tube output stages. A tube output design for a guitar amp almost always requires an output transformer. The way the transformer is wired, ...


14

Off the top of my head... the fret spacing is tighter there, so fingering a fast passage may be easier than in the lower position the timbre of the notes is mellower and 'bluesier', which may be the desired effect open strings can sound different to fretted notes, so it can be desirable to avoid open strings. Muting technique is also different with open ...


10

Uh, that's normal. Guitar strings are not (apart from very special situations) to be played with "the slightest pressure on one string": if you are touching the string at all, you are supposed to press it all the way down until its playing part does no longer end at your finger but rather at the fret (that's one of the small metal bars in the fingerboard) ...


8

There are pieces of software available that can transpose pieces of music (I used to use Adobe Audition, although it did take a long time for the software to export the transposed music). Alternatively, you could use a capo on fret 1 and play as you normally would, only 1 fret higher. If you're not playing chords (or if you're good at bar-chords) you could ...


8

The pitch that a string produces is determined by the frequency of the vibration of the string. In other words how fast is it vibrating. The rate of vibration of a string when it is plucked or struck is dependant on several factors. The tension of the string is only one of the things that will affect the frequency. A string placed under higher tension ...


7

I'm not sure how well I can turn this into an answer, but… If the entire guitar starts off flat & you tune from high E down to low E, lifting each string to pitch as you go, then by the time you've reached low E, the entire tension across the guitar has increased, which will pull the neck forwards slightly & also any tremolo system you may have - ...


7

Ahhh the old "it's your faulty playing technique" response from the guitar tech who did the set up. I've heard that one before too - but did not fall for it. You should not have to alter otherwise proper playing technique to get your guitar to play buzz free. Sometimes positioning of certain phrases you play will necessitate placing your finger farther ...


6

How often do you play loud volume/high gain? This is definitely a skill that is "picked up" over time, and playing in that kind of environment will help you out. One definitely needs to "learn" to play loud. If that makes sense. It can be tackled a few thousand different ways, as I'm sure we'll see in the answers here but what has worked for me is ...


6

These are usually referred to as "A-shape" barre chords -- it's the same note interval arrangement as when playing an open A chord, albeit with muting the high-e string. When you use the "double bar" technique there is no easy way to get a chord tone on the 1st string so you just mute it instead. Some people fret the fourth,third and second strings with ...


5

I'd say you're still pretty new to it, and nothing in music comes very quickly. With that said the best suggestion I have for singing and playing at once is repetition. For me, singing and playing together is almost like learning to play guitar all over again. You have to lock in technically with what you're going to play so that its automatic; and doing it ...


5

While @RockinCowboy's points are all good, in reality you do need to play close to the fret - playing your finger in the middle between frets is not going to work. Your fingers should all be tight up against the back of the fret. If you ever try playing a scalloped fret guitar, you will see just how badly wrong it can go, but this holds true for all ...


5

First of all, there is more than one way to play almost any riff, solo, or musical phrase on a guitar. Unlike a keyboard instrument, the same note in the same octave can be played in multiple places on the guitar. There are many reasons why a guitarist might choose one position to play a certain riff over another position. Sometimes it has to do with ...


4

It depends. How high is high? And what is the cause of the high action? If it is an improperly cut (too high) nut, it will make barré chords in the first few frets difficult, and open chords will be out of tune. If it is too high because of a bridge that is too high, or too much neck relief, it will be increasingly difficult to play the higher up the neck ...


4

I play acoustic guitar primarily but I do use a great deal of sliding on strings to emulate bends that I would do on an electric guitar - and I like to keep the string noise toned down a bit. Most of the string noise I get comes from the lateral movement of my fingers down the strings which can sound like sawing wood on the wound strings as my fingers run ...


4

Use a freeze pedal or freeze function in any slow-downer application or digital recording application to stretch out any note into a continuous tone, the higher the better. Then take your tuner and look at the pitch of the frozen note. The frozen note will be 50 cents or less away from concert pitch. Then recalibrate your tuner to the pitch of the ...


4

Wow - that is a fairly complicated song for someone picking up an electric guitar for the first time! I admire your penchant for a challenge! But I think you might want to start with some easier songs to play and work your way up to that one. It is likely that the guitarist in the video is muting the unplayed strings by lightly touching them with one of ...


4

Well - the term "Stunt Guitarist" could be used to describe guitarist who can be seen live or in many YouTube video's doing things like playing the guitar behind their back, with their toes, using finger tapping to play both necks of a double neck at the same time and using their guitar as a drum while playing it as a guitar at the same time. Playing ...


4

There's a difference between having a note or sound that is periodic at a given frequency (viewed in the time domain), and that note or sound having energy at that frequency (when thought of as a 'spectrum' in the frequency domain). It is actually possible to have a sound that is periodic at (say) 27.5 Hz without having any energy at all 27.5 Hz. In most ...


4

The purpose of studio monitors is to mix recorded music. While one wants extremely accurate professional studio monitors which reproduce a broad frequency range, one also has to mix music in such a way that it will sound good on the kinds of inexpensive consumer-grade speakers and headphones that consumers have in their homes and cars. This is why one does ...


4

Both length and tension work together to create pitch. Note that the strings on a guitar are all approximately the same length and tension,but the bottom is about 4/5 times the diameter of the top string. On any string instrument, it's important that each string is about the same tension as the others, so that becomes static to a degree. So the two variables ...


4

There is no correct answer as to which chord you "should" play because you can use whichever chord you think sounds best in a given situation. What you're describing is essentially changing the voicing or the way the chord sounds without changing the chord. There are many, many ways to play the same chord but each one has its own unique sound. Here are just ...


4

The notation D/A refers to a D major chord with the note A in the bass. This is an example of a major chord in second inversion. The letter after the slash indicates a specific note, not the name of a chord, so your idea of "D/Am" would make no sense. Any triadic chord can be played with the root in the bass, the third in the bass, or the fifth in the bass. ...


4

Adding to Wheat's excellent answer, the note after the slash is indeed the bass note, put there to create an inversion of the prevailing chord, but mainly to make a bass line under the song. As such, if there is only a guitar (or maybe piano) playing, it makes sense for that instrument to play the inversion of the chord indicated. However, once the bassist ...


3

The first notes is something I would call octave chord or something like this, sorry, I don't know the correct english name for it. You play it like a normal powerchord, which means you put your index finger at the 7th string of the a string and the ring finger on the 9th string on the g string. But as shown in the tabs, you don't wan't to play the d string ...


3

Tuning a guitar properly after new strings are installed (even if at the factory) works best if you follow the process I will outline below. First, be sure the strings are installed properly. Each string should wrap around the tuning post at least four times and not overlap. Otherwise the string is more likely to slip on the tuning post. Here is a ...


3

It's just 3 octaves of the chromatic scale. Based on what you say it sounds like it is not the scale, but the range given to compose in. The game is just giving you the range from C1 to B3 to play with to create / make music.


3

Congratulations on your decision to learn guitar. It is very versatile instrument and rewarding to play. But as you have probably figured out by now, not the easiest instrument to master. The good news is, it get's easier as you go and you will start to see an upturn in the learning curve as things begin to sink in and gel. One of the most difficult ...


3

If the guitar is playable, then it shouldn't cause any major issues and may actually help build hand and finger strength. Unless it's so difficult to play that it results in excessive stress. If playing your guitar necessitates too much muscle tension to overcome the high action, playing it could potentially lead to over use/stress injuries. So it really ...



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