New answers tagged

-1

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one key per pitch and ...


1

In writing for the violin family, a small circle also means harmonic, which is produced by lightly touching the string enough to stop it vibrating but not enough to play the note. Sometimes the string is stopped lower down as well, in order to play a different range of harmonics.


1

Of course you can play chords using fingers, pick or in fact anything. The majority of guitarists you will see on TV use a pick for chords. It looks like you are getting hung up on the difference between playing every note simultaneously (eg when you pluck 4 strings at once with your fingers) and playing them almost simultaneously by strumming down across ...


1

You can play chords with a pick, and many players do, however what might be your ideal pick for soloing may not be appropriate for strumming because of it being too hard. You may want to try to find a pick that compromises between the two types of playing, hard enough to let you solo but flexible enough to let you play a strumming pattern. BTW you may want ...


1

Learning to play guitar takes dedication and deliberate practice over a long and sustained period of time! It is a process. There is no short cut that allows you to quickly be able to play like Sungha Jung. I often liken learning to play guitar (or any instrument) as a journey. But the process can be fun if you allow it to be. You can enjoy the journey ...


2

If your board has VU meters (input level meters), that would be a great way to determine if the mic is clipping your signal. If there is audible clipping before your meter indicates your signal is in the red or reaching 0dB then you know your mic is the problem, or the signal before the mic (which seems unlikely unless your amp is actually acting up). If the ...


2

Two options not mentioned so far are: Run another amp and cab offstage and mic that one. This does require a signal splitter, so you can get the tone you want on stage, while doing something different offstage. This doubles the kit, so can double your costs, as well as requiring somewhere to mic up that other amp... Use an attenuator (often called Power ...


7

As already said, mic-preamp clipping cannot possibly be an issue if you use any amp that's legal to operate without a strategic weapons license, and the sound guys know what they're doing. I would add three possible things to joseem's list, that might be the real issue: The sound guys were using the same channel for different purposes (e.g. before you for ...


5

Clipping in this situation could be caused by: 1) the microphone not being the most appropriate to the task at hand, and not being able to capture your audio without, well, clipping. Positioning the mike further away from the amp could possibly lead to some working solution, but could bring other problems, like capturing other sources or ruining your sound ...


6

Get better sound guys. Clipping is an electronic phenomenon when the input signal is too hot for the circuitry, so the tops and bottoms of the waveform are getting shaved off. (This is bad because speakers don't like constant voltages at anything other than 0V.) Microphone signals are far below the line level that the mixer is operating on, so the only way ...


2

Get a teacher. A really really good teacher. A good teacher will help you set your goals and find the means to achieve them. Don't be afraid to switch teachers or even try a couple of different teachers at the same time.


1

Well first of all, kudos to you for hearing the problem and wanting to improve. So the overall answer of course is the speed at which you change fingerings, and this is something that will improve naturally over time as long as you continue to HEAR the problem and focus on improving. But there are also techynical adjustments and tricks you can use. There are ...


2

It could be the set up of the guitar, but it could also be the fact that you let the pressure off the strings too slowly and for too long. This gives the sound of a well pressed down string a chance to buzz. Try to hold on to each note, or each note of a chord, until you're just ready to change to the next. Then get there as quickly as you can. It won't ...


6

Many (most?, all?) musicians go through phases like this, for some people they'll just recur, and you need to accept it. The stereotype of the tortured artist exists for a reason. If you're doing music for your own enjoyment, and aren't enjoying it then stop. Take a long walk, do some gardening, read or write a book. Take a day, a week, or more, off. ...


0

Most often caused by fingers dragging across the the strings when changing chords. The solution? Practice, practice, practice. It takes a while to build up any muscle memory, and considering each chord shape is a muscle memory in its own right, it takes a lot of practicing to switch between your whole chord repertoire seamlessly.


3

They're harmonics, but they don't HAVE to be from open strings, (these examples are), although they're the easiest to produce. Best sounding when plucked very close to the bridge. If a string is fretted, you can use the thumb at the node (any of them) and pluck the note, usually with your pick. They're called pinched harmonics, and are most often heard on ...


3

This bright sound (it needn't be short) is called "harmonics", and it can be produced by putting a finger lightly on a nodal point of an open string- that is, some small fraction of the length (a half, a third, a quarter...) and plucking that string. This will result in a note an octave higher than the open string (if you touch the string halfway), an ...


0

When you are bending strings your fingers catch other adjacent strings in the direction of the bend, so if you're amplified you can usually hear those strings vibrating, and when you release the bend, if the ajdacents strings aren't properly muted, they will ring out. There are two approaches to muting the strings: Fretting hand muting, where you are muting ...


1

The muting or damping you mention is not related to bending or any other technique. If you want to ensure no unwanted ringing on strings other than those you are trying to play, then muting can be very useful, but whether or not you want to at any specific time is up to you. I sometimes mute (but not necessarily with my left hand - sometimes it is more ...


2

I would not say that the first finger must be used to mute the lower strings but you can do so if you wish. There might be a particular circumstance (trying to achieve a certain effect perhaps) where muting the lower strings with your first finger might help. If you are picking only the string you are bending at the time the note is played - it is ...


-2

I have the same thing happen on fender acoustic and squire start electric. It could happen very quickly after just a few hours; being a finish carpenter I know that the wood is not going to pull in or lose that much humidity that quickly. So I would venture to guess it's our technique coupled maybe with the styles we play. I've been using finger picking ...


1

First you should start with what key you want your music to be in - maybe a major key if your song is a Pop song. Then, you need to work out how many beats in a bar your music is going to have: 4/4, 3/4, 8/8? Now, to compose the melody of your music, imagine how you want your music to be. I can't help you with your melody, because you are the only one who ...


6

All new strings need a good stretch to allow them to bed in. The metal itself has to stretch a little, the windings round the post have to settle and the neck has to re-adjust to the tension change. Along each string, pull and push, but not like you'd pull a bow (and arrow). Lift up and push down a couple of inches away from each other - it's not easy to ...


1

There is not really a pro or con you could define here, at least not for sound. Amp Heads and box are more common it seems, but it really depends on your requirements and what you like. A head+cab combination is a bit more comfortable compared to a combo, a combo is propably easier to transport, compared to a 4x12 box+head. With seperate preamp and power ...


0

If the tabs had chord names above the fingerings it would be much easier to play and memorize. The chords guide you on how to finger the melody. If you know basic guitar chords then it should be easy to recognize how to play the piece. Looks like the song uses F, Am, and G chords shapes at the 7th position using a capo. I would use my thumb for the F ...


0

The second way is the only way I can play that shape, as my ring-finger does not bend backwards, and I'd have claimed that it's the way most guitarists play it. Plus, the second method allows you to move your ring-finger to the next fret to get a sus4 voicing, which adds color. When using the CAGED system, I like to keep all my fingers in play.


4

I use and teach both ways. Tend to use the three fingers on the wider frets, and change to the one finger + barre version when the frets are too narrow - around 5/6. The ring finger HAS to bend backwards, so as to allow the top string to sound. There are a couple of other ways, though, using two fingers to cover the 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings. Looking at your ...


0

There is Ditto x4 looper http://www.tcelectronic.com/ditto-x4-looper/ I think it does everything you asked for


2

I was having the same problem as a beginner and wondered the exact same thing. I even tried switching to playing guitar the other way around (fretting with my dominant right hand). That's when I discovered something interesting. You see by the time I became frustrated with my seemingly clumsy left hand because of the things it could not seem to do as ...


1

The simplest option I believe is to use tuxguitar. You have to edit track properties. Change them to Violin tuning. No you can write tab inside program. After finishing again change tuning back to guitar and ensure transpose affected notes is checked. You should have the guitar tab now. This tutorial may be helpful in learning tux guitar in general


2

The guitar is not just tuned in a standard tuning which is transposed down. From what I can hear and see, the low three strings are definitely C G D I believe that the high strings are just standard tuning, which would make the complete tuning C G D G B E which is not one of the standard open tunings but a mix of drop C and standard tuning. The tuning ...


1

Sounds like a baritone to me. They use a slightly longer scale length, and thicker strings, and one of the many tunings is C F Bb Eb G C, so standard chord shapes can be used. Not as low as a standard bass guitar - in fact the bottom 4 strings (in B E A D tuning) are an octave above normal 5 string bass guitar tuning.


3

From my perspective, which is less theory and more practice, I would always try and approach this chords first. Listen to the rhythm guitarist. On the run up to the solo and then all the way through the solo, the rhythm guitarist (or keyboard or whatever) will be providing you with all the chords so you don't need to guess what the soloist is playing from. ...


1

I think I might see where you are confused. Let me see if I can explain. Each shape is moveable. What that means is that you can move a given shape up or down the fret board so the first position or first note played (the root note) starts on a different pitched root. If the root note is first played on the 6th string and you have 22 frets - you can ...


1

In Rocksmith the "adaptive band" functionality isn't really adaptive. All they have implemented is a large number of parallel recordings with slightly different styles, and dependent on your skills in the game it decides which one will get played at any time. So there isn't actually any adaptation happening as regards your playing. The game is just moving ...


9

Twelve string guitars have basic tuning the same as a 6 string (EADGBE) but the pairs are arranged a little differently: For the thickest 4 pairs (EADG) the thinner string of each pair should be an octave higher than the thicker string For the thinnest two pairs (BE) each string of the pair should be tuned in unison. There is a handy tuner online at ...


0

It is usual to be told that learning guitar initially involves learning lots of chord and scale shapes. You can buy books called "1500 chords you must learn", and so on. This can be a distraction, and for me, it makes the guitar seem more complicated than it really is. I prefer to just remember two basic, fundamental shapes - I'll call them "north-east", ...


0

I think I understand what the OP is asking although I can't be sure. Violin tabs and guitar tabs are both real and valid staffs but they are not transferable. This is because they have different tunings. A guitar tab will go as follows: E (High) B G D A E (Low) As you can see the strings ascend in perfect fourths (5 semitones) A violin tab will go like ...


1

Frank, if your problem is osteo-arthritis, my sincere sympathies. I've got this and am still trying to figure out how to work around it. If you have a good physiotherapist (or physical therapist) who specialises in hands, they may be able to concoct a splint that immobilises the relevant joint/joints, to divert the pressure to a joint that is less affected. ...


1

It's entirely possible to play pieces written on staves for violin to be played on guitar. The only difference is that the guitar will sound an octave lower. There MAY be problems with some of the notes being too high or too low, but that's doubtful. If you really want to be able to change violin music into guitar tab, then you will have to learn how to ...


0

There is also a lot of proper violin music available, so it is just as well to learn to play guitar using real music. It's just another skill, a different (and probably far more useful) one.


2

"bis" is just Latin for "twice", it's a pretty common expression in romance language countries, not so much in other ones, I guess. I had never seen it in tablatures before, but I suppose the meaning should be to repeat the previous segment.


1

Although far from exact, a quick and simple method is to "sight" down the neck. That is, hold the guitar outstretched from your face (with the bridge end closest to your face), and look along the edges of the fretboard (one at a time). What do you see? You should normally see a wee bit of concave curvature -- that's what your truss rod adjusts. If you see ...


0

There are more, except that when you reach the octave copy higher up the neck, it becomes the same as those lower. The clue's in 'pentatonic'. With five notes to play with, so to speak, by the time we get to the sixth, we're back at the beginning again. There are really only two SCALES here. The minor pent., starting for the sake of argument on the open ...


0

The first shape of the (minor) pentatonic scale always starts on the root note of the scale on the low E string. So if you are improvising in E minor pentatonic, then the first shape would start on the open E string (As you probably know). The intervals of the pentatonic scale are different between every note: m3, M2, M2, m3, M2. The intervals in each ...


4

It's because you can start/continue the the pattern on any of the notes of the pentatonic scale. The collection of notes you have will always be the same, but the exact pattern of the scale will be different. Let's look at the E minor pentatonic scale to start with. In the E minor penatonic scale you have the following notes with the following intervals: ...


0

I just wanted to add polychords fall into these same transposition answers that @awe, @slim, and @Tim succinctly provided. The usual dead giveaway of a polychord is the chord type specified in the notation (not just a bass note Bmin/E). The reason I bring this up is because the slash notation is used as well for them. For a polychord you actually are ...


1

I don't have time for a long careful answer, but... If you do most of your "stretching" between your first and second finger you will find a larger reach than if you worried about making space between each finger. Further, if you place your pinkie (fourth finger) in a comfortable position and reach back with your first finger (stretch with your first ...


2

I have three tips for you, and the third one works for most people with smaller hands: As a final goal, try to play that riff in the seventh position, as you've tabbed it out. All other theoretically possible options won't give you the right sound. This is an important standard riff that is worth to learn well. As an exercise, play the same riff a few ...


8

That is in fact a stretch but perhaps not impossible - even for small hands. One thing you must be sure you are doing is correctly positioning your fretting hand on the neck for that type progression involving a maximum stretch. You will probably find it easier to make the stretch if you position your thumb near the center of the back of the neck and ...



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