Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

On a steel string acoustic you really have to trust that the manufacturers mathematics and building techniques have got the scale length correct. The frets in the correct location and the bridge saddle in the right place and at the correct angle. Then it can vary with string guage and the guitars set up. Now add the players techniquie and the word Compromise ...


2

After getting over crippling tendonitis in both thumbs, I gave up guitar in favor of bass guitar. I can't explain the reason that bass is less painful, but it definitely is. I also had an injury to my right thumb that makes gripping a pick difficult. With bass, I can use my fingers, or I use a Herco pick with loop on it, similar to the thumb pick that a ...


4

To add to the answer that mentions lap steel, David Gilmour can be seen playing lap steel here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lap_steel_guitar. Jeff Healey (before his untimely death aged only 41) was a rock/blues/jazz guitarist who held his guitar like a lap steel guitar. Because he largely taught himself from the age of 3, and was blind, he wasn't ...


11

Consider switching to the ukulele. With only four strings, your left thumb is not needed to hold down strings, and you might find the lower tension and smaller neck of the uke easier to hold than a guitar. A pick is not needed with a uke, and many people strum with their index finger, so your right thumb is not necessary, either.


1

The gliss hurts; cheap strings, hit too hard - after half a second or so they settle down to tuning (ish), but both 1 & 2 are a bit painful for me. I'm not sure I can bear to listen to 3... Edit 1 bar of 3, switched it off. Answer to the question... "Yes, they are out of tune"


1

This is common for all guitars, with and without a tremolo, in my experience. I have noticed this happen on my acoustic and two different electrics. The guitar's neck is angled so the tension of the strings, when in tune, will cause it to assume the correct shape. Without strings, the neck will relax and be straighter/longer than it would be when strung. ...


11

You could transition to lap steel, or dobro; using finger picks on your right hand and a slide on one of your left fingers shouldn't require use of your thumbs. Maybe autoharp? -- not quite a guitar but still a strummed stringed instrument. From what I can tell, it should be playable without using the thumbs too much.


2

Assuming your guitar has a decent action, there's no need to squeeze the neck with your thumb to play.By holding the body with your other elbow/arm, your chords and single notes can be held by counteracting this tension pulling backwards with your fretting fingers. It will feel rather strange after all those years, but it does work. For single note stuff, ...


4

Sound in tune to me. The second example is a semitone down on standard 440Hz pitch,but still in tune. It may be that Russian tuning is/was not the same as Western standard, but still in tune with itself. Spot the 7 string guitars? Standard low B strung when I bought mine in Leningrad, in 1964 !! So it's not such a modern idea. The videotapes must be 40-50 ...


0

Tremolo systems are a balancing act between strings and springs, especially if you've set it so it goes down and up. Eddie Van Halen, for example, has his Floyd Rose set to only go down, so (among other things) he can use a Drop-D add-on without throwing the whole setup out of balance. To recap and reiterate: If you're rocking a whammy-bar guitar, look into ...


4

A similar question to this was asked over the last couple of weeks. I guess the guitar has a vibrato. In this case, as the strings are loosened, it makes the springs in the vibrato relatively stronger, thus they pull the remaining strings tighter, and so, higher in pitch.This is a phenomenon associated with vibratos (trems), and is basically the nature of ...


1

In that price range, your best bet may be a vintage guitar that no longer LOOKS beautiful, but still SOUNDS beautiful. As with all vintage players, an in-hand personal inspection is essential to distinguish between cosmetic issues and structural concerns. Above all, based upon the few that I've observed, inspect it for a truss rod, and closely inspect the ...


-1

Well based on your questions, here are some things to look for in an archtop: 6 strings An arched top and back, not flat Moveable adjustable bridge F-holes similar to members of the violin family Rear mounted tailpiece, stoptail bridge or Bigsby tremolo 14th-fret neck join Honestly aside from that its all dependent on what kind of music you are playing, ...


2

Some good comments - to recap and add my own twist: When the guitar is playing bar chords, the main notes are 1-5-8 (F-C-F, etc.), an octave with a fifth in the middle. Keyboardists are tempted to throw in a third. DON'T! Two reasons - 1) the guitar usually does not play the third; and 2) if the guitarist is wrong picking major or minor (keyboardists are ...


-1

Let try some Boucher guitar, There are known for sounding like pre-war martin. The company also make Adirondack top for high end Martin and taylor.


1

Drop tuning is totally trendy right now, every new metal band seems to use it, I tried to cover all the reasons why, because I love to use it as well: Easy to play Drop Tuning is very easy to play. It does not only provide the possibility to play most chords with only one finger, but also typical progressions in the metal genre are closer to each other ...


0

I play 11's and I play very clean classical type stuff, as well as, very very fast technical metal. I started playing high gauge strings when I played an electric with 13's on it. I absolutely loved it because the strings were far far tighter and as a result they have (in my opinion) a much quicker response/attack. When I tried to play fast on 9's my rythms ...


3

A look up of the guitar shows a few different prices. The highest priced seller was a vintage seller for an extremely high $57,900 for an original in mint condition. That however, does not match with what the guitars are going for on eBay which is from $2,995.00 to $3,499.00. This however includes mostly non originals and remakes of that modle guitar. ...


4

If both guitars buzz with light strings but not with heavier strings, then there are a couple of options. I'm assuming the buzz is happening when the string touches a fret somewhere near the middle of its vibrating length; if the buzz is at the nut or bridge or somewhere else, then this line of thinking does not apply. You could switch to a heavier gauge, ...


1

Another "trick" you can do is tune down the guitar (I recommend 1 or 1/2 tone, more may require neck adjustments) and use, if you want, a capo; the strings will have less tension and will be easier to bend. You can also experiment alternative tunings, which are usually softer than standard. However, difficult bendings are only a matter of exercise, keep on ...


1

Since it hasn't been mentioned (my apologies if I missed it), I'd like to point out that you can be very effective bending only a 1/2 musical step. Wider bends (like a whole step bend) are also easier near the middle of the string span, rather than down where you are playing open chords. So look for places within the scales of the chords you are playing ...


0

If you're using metal (steel) strings, acoustic strings are generally thicker than electric guitar strings. For that reason, string bending is more common with electric guitarists. The gauge of the string makes a difference in that lighter strings are physically easier to bend (less metal to move about) and are more responsive in that you don't have to bend ...


0

I would change string gauges and see what you think. If sou do decide to do this I would recommend a slight tightening on the truss rod.


3

Bending strings on a steel stringed acoustic guitar can be done to good effect. It works on a nylon stringed too, but is less common. You can try a lighter string gauge to make it easier. Especially steel stringed guitars are usually stringed with pretty brutal gauges. All major string manufacturers have lighter gauge acoustic strings. For nylon stringed ...


0

An important factor is the loudness of the string. This done'st change the note, of coures, but the tuner will be only sensitive to so much of the string's "note life"- that is : You pluck the string. The attack in the note tells the tuner to start 'listening' for a note. The tuner can gather something while the signal is clear and strong As the note dies ...


0

I've noticed this and I really think it's simply due to the fact that over time the loudness of the note tapers off, so the tuner is less able to accurately pickup the tone with its microphone.


0

The fact you have picked up on this shows you have a good ear, here are some tips to make your guitar ring like an angel :) Make sure you have a good tuner that is accurate, (doesn't have to be expensive). Read plenty of reviews on it don't just go buy one. Always tune turning up, if you overshoot go back and start again. This makes sure there is no ...


0

For shame. You have all overlooked (the) Melvins. Dale Crover and Coady Willis. If you don't know, you should look into this.


1

I'm not a doctor so this isn't medical advice but: Essential Tremor I believe is very similar if not identical to what you're suffering from. Eliminating caffeine can reduce or eliminate essential tremors as well as the prescription drug Propranolol. The effects of doing either of these things is almost immediate so you only have to skip coffee and tea ...


1

I believe what you are experiencing are called "essential tremors". My daughter has had them in her right hand for most of her adult life, and, unfortunately, there is no known cure or treatment.


1

Aside from the "Drop-D" issue, definitely DO get into the habit of doing your own string replacement and tuning. Besides gaining the experience, even the best guitars need re-tuning several times with new strings until they settle in and stretch out. You can help this along by changing one string at a time, so the neck tension is only changing a little at a ...


0

You do a full bar and have the power chord ring while you play melody type things on the other strings. The guitarist from Billy Talent does that pretty good. In classical music you rely heavy on the bass note ringing. So if you drop the E you get an entirely new note that rings and brings a new key to an E centered instrument.


1

Approach learning from Anthony Wellington's 4 levels of awareness. You can find an article about it here: http://www.playguitarlive.com/the-4-levels-of-awareness-for-musicians/


4

Assuming strings have been bedded in, and all are properly in tune to standard, then the whole guitar is in balance. That is, the strings exert a tension against the neck and the vibrato system, usually springs. When one string is changed, that balance is changed. Lowering a string pitch will loosen that string, so the opposing part of the balance becomes ...


1

Is the guitar in tune with itself(ie 5th fret low E string == A string etc)? If this is the case the problem may be with your tuner.


1

If it has a tremolo that is not set flush to the guitar body, then retuning one will affect the tuning of the others, by altering the overall tension against the springs.


1

If the strings are nylon then they will require many days of constant retuning before they stabilise


2

Generic pedals that are useful for all electric guitar genres are: Volume boost and Volume rocker pedal for solos and for adjusting volume on the fly. Overdrive for solos, tone coloration and sustain Chorus for shimmering effects and to soften the harshness of the overdrive


7

The line between Blues, Rock and Metal can be "fuzz"ier than you'd think. Effects can be broken up into three classes: Gain, Modulation and Time (GMT), and roughly, they are placed in the chain in this order. (If you place things out of this order and like the sound, you are under no requirement to change.) In the Gain section, Distortion occurs when the ...


3

Best advise I can give is to think about which artist exemplifies any given genre in your mind and research his setup. An often overlooked item is a graphic equalizer placed after a run of the mill distortion box. By cutting or boosting certain frequencies post distortion you can traverse between many classic rock and metal sounds. As an aside, the term ...


1

Changing tubes requires a re-biasing. If you don't know what this means and don't have the proper equipment, then do not try anything like this. For your safety and your amp's safety. Simply being an octal power amp tube does not automatically make any two tubes 'switchable' and 'comparable'. Some amps have a built in bias switch to allow switching between ...


1

This is a subjective question, but my opinion is that there is only one essential pedal for a gigging musician: a tuner. Obviously, tuners keep you in tune, and they also serve as a kill switch so you can put your guitar down without worrying about feedback. I feel the best overdriven or distorted sounds are generated by tube amps, not pedals, for any ...


7

Effects are usually a relatively personal topic among guitar players, so you will probably get a lot of variation among answers to this question. I can give my opinion on the matter but it's always best to experiment yourself and figure out what you like the sound of. Generally I use an overdrive/distortion, a fuzz pedal, and a delay pedal for my ...


1

You can learn theory by ear training. Playing songs just by ear and learning them is learning theory by instincts. But you couldn't communicate with anyone what you know verbally. People like Hendrix or James Hetfield from Metallica are known not to have any training but used their ears for composing or improvising music. They gained a huge vocabulary of ...


3

Find an article or book about music theory. When you read about a new concept, put the book down and improvise with the new material you just learned. I'm doing this myself right now. I never actually learned many typical rock or traditional Western harmonies, preferring to use modal chords and exotic modes instead. A few days ago, I realized this was ...


2

It is rasguedo, with a touch of tremolo where he plays the same note several times in succession. The rasguedo is strumming the strings with several fingers, one after the other in a sort of flicking motion.


2

Looks like a kind of Rasgueado to me.


2

My first move would be - on condition the valve bases are compatible - to take out the valves from one amp, and use them in the second. Of course, I'd make a recording of each, to have an A-B comparison. There is going to be a difference in the circuitry between the two, mostly in the pre-amp side, appertaining to eq. as much as anything, so a direct ...


0

If you're having trouble playing with the little finger, try using a capo and moving it up the neck. That way, you can get practice with good technique in a position where you don't have to stretch as far. After you've got that working, move the capo a few frets closer to the nut and work out your exercises there. Eventually, you'll have the finger ...


1

To play the chord D/F#, and pretty much anything that involves using my thumb to fret or mute, I usually keep the webbing between my thumb and index fingers wrapped around the neck, so I can bend my thumb over the top. I keep my hand/palm in pretty close contact to the neck- not tight, you don't have to squeeze.. it's hard to describe, but something like ...



Top 50 recent answers are included