Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Some aids for diagnosis: Before you go having the neck adjusted, check the nut. That's the bridge at the tuning peg end of the neck. If you're having string buzz when playing open strings, it could be that the neck is overly bent back (towards "behind you" if you were wearing it), as other have stated. That means there may be hump in the middle of the ...


1

One thing you can do that will help you assess the trouble, is to take a sharpie marker, and play each string one at a time. If the string buzzes in a particular fret on a spot, mark the top of the fret with the sharpie. So do this for each string at each fret position. Once you're done look at the marks and the placement of where they're at on the length of ...


1

I know this is an old thread, but I'd like to add something I think hasn't been mentioned much. In my younger days, I hated maple fingerboards purely out of looks. I just never was a fan of that bright looking fingerboard on guitars. I always have been a rock guy, blues and metal type music. So for me I always liked the looks of rosewood or ebony boards. I ...


3

Yes, in the old days all three strat pickups would have been the same, wound on a simple machine. As tastes progressed it became fairly common to buy an add on bridge pickup with more windings, for a higher level and "heavier" tone, or even a humbucker - but the neck and middle tend not to be different in construction. However there's one thing in your ...


1

Maybe get in the habit of singing along with your guitar. Or maybe I should say, play along with your voice. It seems that when you use your voice, your natural creativity comes out more directly. So if you allow your voice and your hands to track each other, maybe your inner creativity will have an easier time flowing through your guitar.


3

I would call what you want to do - playing melodies by ear. It's easier to do on piano because of the logical way the keyboard is laid out. Ascending one key is always a semitone higher, descending lower. Piano was the first instrument I learned to play and I quickly developed the ability to play any melody by ear on the piano. With guitar, it took ten ...


2

Here's my guess, since there seems to be no answer anywhere online. Martin Guitars has been around since 1833. They sell various nut widths up to 1 7/8. I am a hat maker. Virtually everyone used to wear a hat. You could get the same hat in various oval shapes to match your head shape, round, round oval, medium oval, medium long oval, long oval, extra long ...


6

There are two components involved here. One is indeed ear training, and the other one is knowing your instrument well, i.e. being able to produce any melody as effortlessly as you do with your voice. And for this second part, you do not need to consciously know the intervals as long as you intuitively find the right notes on your instrument. But anyway, ...


-1

I play rhythm 90-95% of the time. The fatter, chunkier the better. Chords and walking lines. Few years ago switched to 12-52s cuz they felt more like my acoustic, which always sports 12s or 13s. Fingers got so toughened up, I can't even feel 9s or 10s under my fingers any more. Have no desire to be another Eddie or Yngvie. I'm about the groove. Let the ...


1

I've been using regular minor thirds ("diminished") tuning for 20 years. As best I can tell, this was also Django Rheinhardt's secret trick. Some early delta blues players used it as well. The tuning lacks a bit of range, and I make up for this by making the highest interval (2nd to 1st string) increase by a perfect fifth (7 frets) instead of minor 3rd. ...


0

I recognize this is a question resurrected from 4 years ago. But after reading all the answers, there is something missing that I feel compelled to add for the sake of anyone who comes across this question in the future. Adding a capo will almost always cause the tuning to go sharp to some extent. That's not a problem if you are playing solo with no ...


0

My band plays in many different capo positions and it can really limit the way you arrange live set lists due to the tuning issues (and the time that it takes to effectively tune) that capos present. My experience is that when you attach a capo to the neck of the guitar, you will generally be sharp and will need to tune down some. I'm a lead player, so ...


0

You could always utilize a scoring program, such as Sibelius or Finale. I've used both and they're both pretty good at capturing MIDI and transcribing it. The programs often generate some strange rhythmic interpretations for MIDI performances, but Sibelius has a built function where you can find an equivalent notation and sometimes it fixes it, sometimes ...


0

Try ScoreCloud. It does a fantastic job with MIDI input. Better than anything else I've tested.


2

From my experience as a guitar teacher there are some people who (with some practice) are able to play that chord, and some simply aren't. You're dependent on the size of your hand and especially of the flexibility of your third finger. People who can flex their third finger in the "wrong" direction will find it easier to play that chord. Also your pinky ...


2

All full-featured notation programs available these days can "transcribe" from MIDI input (and even GarageBand has a notation mode). But these are always prone to errors, since your rhythmic inputs are non-mechanical timings, for which the program needs to guess what rhythm you meant. So really, this functionality is provided mostly as an input shortcut for ...


0

As noted in other answers the tuning is one full step flat from standard. The easiest way to play this is to start with a 3rd fret G Barre chord formation then lift the barre finger so that instead of barring you are only fretting the 3rd fret on the 6th (fattest) string. Then arpeggiate the strum one string at a time. There is not an actual barre used ...


0

I am/was in the same position. I felt like I was groping in the dark and needed help, not least to not learn bad habits at the beginning. I couldn't afford an hour a week tutor so I found one who does half an hour for half the price. It really helps as you get pointers, structure and motivation (you have to come back next week and show him you practiced what ...


0

Seems to me, if the tuning is standard, that no barre is needed. Instead, play a Gmaj like you would with a barre, but only use the tip of the barre finger(index) on the bottom (fat)E. Then play each string in turn, bottom to top. Then slide the bottom down a fret. My tuner can't find the three notes S,L and I... Hearing it, all strings are tuned down a ...


0

I am confused by the "SLIDEE" written down the side, but aside from that, I would personally play this with my thumb over the top fretting the 3rd fret on the low E string, then ring finger (third finger) on the 5th fret of the A string, pinky (fourth finger) on the 5th fret of D, and middle finger (second) on the 4th fret of G. Most people don't fret with ...


1

I've owned over 300 guitars and have played for 27 years. I buy and sell. I also repair. I do set ups and finish repair. I will tell you that brand new strings can make a maple neck look old and give you "coal miner's fingers". I think that some graphite is put on the strings as they are being made. Perhaps so as to not rust in the package. Stain can come ...


0

It depends on how you're going about it but the traditional way, if not playing a barre chord, is 2nd finger on low E3, 1st finger on A2, and little finger on B3 and E3. I used to find that a handful so I cheated, and it's stuck with me for 25 years. I use my thumb over the top of the fretboard to play low E3, mute the A string with end of my thumb, and 2nd ...


0

It sounds like you are new to guitar chords. Just practice, practice, and practice. Work on it every day (maybe for about 20 minutes at a time). Chords are not easy for beginners. I personally had a difficult time at first, and would struggle to prevent some of the strings from being muted, to be able to hold down all the necessary strings to their ...


0

Different guitar builders use different size truss rods and you need the specific type wrench and exact size for your guitar. Some truss rods are adjusted with a socket wrench while others use an allen wrench and others may use different type wrenches. Under no circumstances should you ever attempt to use the wrong size truss rod wrench or you could ...


4

There are a number of ways to play a G chord in what I call first position (using some open strings). The easiest possible way to play it is to fret the high e (first) string on the third fret with a finger of your choice and play the four strings closest to the floor (the four skinniest strings 1-4). Here are the charts for 5 ways to play a G chord in ...


0

You can try this: http://www.finalemusic.com/ it can help produce the information neatly for viewing.


0

Good question. It depends on how you interpret music in your mind. I myself prefer scale degrees. If you can easily understand the space between the tonic and the actual notes, then you should choose the scale degrees also. However, you should really keep in mind that you have a good outcome.


0

I do think some of the answers so far are awesome. Let me please add by indicating something I was taught in music school. The mode of a sequence of notes is also important, as the mode one is in can actually alter what the ear "hears." For example the relative minor of CM is Am. The "notes" are exactly the same when no accidentals are present, yet we hear ...


0

Another idea, if you don't want to read tab or sheet music, is to focus on your right hand and strumming/picking hand and don't look up the neck. It takes practice and time for your fingers to naturally find their positions on the neck. There's no real shortcuts except consistency in your practice (eg. always playing the chord with the same hand ...


0

It probably depends on how you 'hear' music. For example ... Absolute pitch : I have recently been playing with a folk vocalist who doen'st play an instrument so we spent a bit of time getting the song into the right key for her. Her first choice was always pretty much the orignal key of a recording she'd learnt from - any other key felt 'odd', implying ...


1

You can strike a natural harmonic, like a nice G at the octave fret across the D,G,B strings, then play fret 2 on D and 1 on B string to turn it into a C afterwards. If you fret them quickly & decisively, the harmonic of the G still rings and it sounds like harmonics in C - but a chord. I do this sometimes and if I get it right, it can sound really ...


1

If you play the C or F harmonics with your fingernail on the side of the string instead of your fingertip on top of the string, you can bend them into tune (or bend many other harmonics). There is also a C just above the 11th fret of the E strings and an F on the 11th fret of the A string. They're pretty fuzzy sounding and take a lot of pressure. They ...


0

Every guitar player is different so it depends. I have a friend who took piano lessons and read music before learning guitar and she would much rather know the names of the notes. I play based on sound and feel and knowing where to put my fingers relative to where they are now to get to the note I want next relative to the note I am on. But I have a ...


2

With the guitar being a positional instrument, meaning one can play the same tune in many different keys but retain the same fingering and strings, merely moving where on the neck the tune is played, then knowing note names as the tune unfolds is not necessary. The relationship between the tonic and other notes, as far as where they are relatively speaking, ...


0

I think it would be better to think the scale degrees. For instance, let's say you play E (V) and then Am (i); if you think in scale degrees, then you will lead the notes that consist the V (E major chord) to the tonic chord (A minor). This way, you make the listener believe that there is some connection between the notes you play. They are two degrees of ...


0

One possible approach - which is what I would do but not necessarily the best - is the following. Do as you would do when you have to read the music (and thus can't watch the fretboard as @OldJohn points out): Get sheet music, or transcribe the piece yourself. Fire up a metronome at a comfortable speed and look at the music, not at the fretboard. ...


4

I understand where you are coming from. I used to have the same problem. To overcome this takes a concerted effort and dedicated practice. You must develop muscle memory so that you can put your brain and fretting hand on auto pilot. To internalize the movements needed to play a song, take one part at a time. Play it over and over while looking at the ...


1

One test is to attach a small battery - 1.5v is fine - to each speaker. The cone should jump either in or out on contact. This is mainly for checking the polarity of each speaker, so that they can be connected in series or parallel properly. Connect each individually, not while in circuit. It will tell whether a speaker is still responding, although if ...


0

I think the (only?) safe way to go here is to shell out another couple of bucks and buy a guitar to iPhone interface, so that you can connect the high impedance input of the guitar to the iPhone which, in turn, will act as an amplifier simulator and output the processed signal to the speakers. The IK iRig is pretty cheap, but not the only choice: ...


1

The capo allows you to play a song in a particular key using chord shapes and formations from a different key. For example if you like to use the open (first position) chords in the key of G major such as G, C, D, Em and Am but want to sing a song in the key of A, you can put a capo on the second fret and play the chords as if you were playing in the key of ...


3

It doesn't quite work like that. The guitar doesn't exactly have a single key that its "in". Instead it has chords that are easier and more difficult to play. Some relatively easy ones (sticking with just major chords) include C, G, D, A, and E, which allows you to play in quite a few different keys. If you were playing in the key of D, you'd likely see a ...


5

I believe that when J. Rudess is referring to "pattern based" he is talking about describing musical phrases as a series of relative intervals, and then repeating those series of intervals from different starting pitches. On a guitar this is straight forward to do by moving up and down the neck: play a particular passage, and then play the same ...


4

I assume he partly means that it's not Isomorphic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isomorphic_keyboard). The guitar is not fully isomorphic either when tuned in a standard way due to the G-B interval being different to all the others, though you can use a different tuning with consistent string intervals. I also think he may be noticing that the Axis and ...


1

To add to @OldJohn's answer, renaissance viols also followed this "kinked" tuning pattern, e.g. D G C E A D (6 strings) or A D G C E A D (7 strings). Clearly this tuning meme was applied to a range of different types of fretted instruments. One possible explanation is that it helped to accommodate them to non-equal temperaments, using "unequally" spaced ...


1

As already said, this will completely change the tuning on all frets. So, the only way this could be usable is if you want to play in a tuning other than the western standard 12-edo. If you move the bridge only slightly, the lower frets will still make up an approximately equal-tempered tuning, just with another step size. Making the scale a bit shorter ...


2

The fret spacing (distance of each fret from the saddle) is very precise for any given scale length. Many guitar manufacturers stick with common scale lengths so they don't have to constantly re-calculate the fret spacing. But the scale length varies between guitar builders and some even offer options for different scale lengths. Moving the bridge even ...


0

Correct break angle is important at both ends.. not just the nut. The saddle must not be cut so low as to create a shallow break angle or this will make the string jump or vibrate in an unmusical way. This often happens on old acoustic guitars that have seen better days..someone fails to adjust the truss rod or the neck has moved and in order to lower the ...


0

You could possibly get this to work by having a temporary bridge - possibly just a piece of wood with an acoustic guitar saddle strip - resting on the belly of the guitar. It would be held in place by the string tension. It would be necessary to take out the existing bridge saddles etc. The rest of the bridge would remain to anchor the strings. It would ...


6

Not only would your fretted notes play flat, but as you go further up the fretboard, the flatter your notes will get!


4

All the notes would play flat (lower in pitch). The 12th fret (for example) should normally be halfway along the string, so that it sounds an octave higher than the open string. If the bridge saddle is further from the 12th fret than the nut is, the 12th fret would play a pitch lower than the octave above the open string.



Top 50 recent answers are included