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0

The simple way to look at it, in 4/4 especially, is that each beat will generally be a down strum. This means, d,d,d,d for each bar. After each down, your hand must return to the top of the strings for the next down strum. You could strum up at that point rather than missing the strings. So d,u,d,u,d,u,d,u in each bar. This often sounds too busy, so some ...


1

The previous commenters are giving useful information, but as an amateur acoustic guitarist with small hands, I think the critical issue is not the size of the body, but the width, depth, and length of the neck. Small hands make it harder to span the frets, especially at the bottom of the fretboard where the beginner or "cowboy" chords live. One cool trick ...


1

First you need to get the correct drivers to operate this interface. These should be the ASIO drivers supplied by Alesis, but ASIO4all might also work ok. Once the drivers are ready, you should see them in Reaper's ASIO devices list. Next get rid of that clean signal you're hearing already. It seems a lot like you're dealing with a direct hardware ...


3

A simple Google search for guitar chords will find many versions. Some are printable and some are best viewed on line as an interactive device. Here is one that seems quite thorough, is easy to read, and can be printed or saved on your computer. It's a free download and I just downloaded two copies of it to my computer. Click this link Free Guitar Chord ...


3

This PDF seems pretty thorough: http://www.guitaralliance.com/acoustic_package/strummingschool/chords/Voicings.pdf


1

Here is the simplest diagram I could find. http://www.diyguitarmods.com/wiringillustrations/1HB-1V.jpg The wire coming from your pickup will most probably, if not undoubtedly, have one thin stranded wire, the hot lead, surrounded by a mesh, the ground shield. This mesh wire can be pulled from around the insulation and twisted into a usable wire that you can ...


3

There are definitely different sizes of adult acoustic guitars. If you have to "hulk" around the body of your instrument it is probably going to make life very hard while playing. Travel or gig size guitars can still have a very full sound and there is no "benefit" to having one size or shape, it comes down to personal preference. Further difficulties in ...


4

I commend you on your desire to learn to play guitar. It is a very versatile instrument and can provide a lifetime of enjoyment at any proficiency level. But it is not the easiest instrument to learn to play because of the need to train your brain to get your hands and fingers to contort in very un-natural positions, not to mention tender fingertips ...


0

Yes, you have the right idea. The major and minor pents use exactly the same notes, thinking relative. as in C maj is relative to A min. This also works for full major and natural minor. And if you take modes, for example, C Ionian has the same notes as D Dorian, E Phrygian, F Lydian, G Mixolydian, A Aeolian and B Locrian. This lot can be moved to any key, ...


0

Put emphasis on the C note of the Minor Pentatonic patterns from your example. Start by beginning and ending phrases using the C note in the example you have. You can play all the Minor Pentatonic scale patterns this way directed towards the C note. You have to know where you are going, what is the root note you are after. To define a modes play the scale ...


0

You can easily figure out the Major Pentatonic Scale by thinking of the black keys on the piano. If you start on F# the Major Pentatonic will have all the black keys on the piano. F#-G#-A#-C#-D# From there you can easily deduce the intervals between these notes and then apply them to any other note you want to build this scale on. F#-G# = MAJ 2nd ...


1

A few steps. Learn the theory so you know what the notes are. This will enable you to figure out the shapes for yourself and get a good idea of what chords will go well with you solo. Learn the shapes Don't stymie creativity by only doing scales in one position. Do them in one, two and three string patterns. Start on your 1st, 2nd and even 4th left hand ...


0

Shapes, and not just the "box" or "three notes per string," but also learn the intervals and the shape of the scale up and down each string. This will allow you to connect boxes and also to play some cool sliding-around solos without getting lost.


1

As has been noted above, the guitar is a shape-based instrument. So learn the shapes first. But the shapes tend to connect across the fretboard. So after you learn the shapes, learn to connect shapes adjacent to one another by any string. Now you can play up and down the fretboard. But the strongest notes you can play in a solo are the chord tones ...


3

This track seems to me to be right on the beat. Keys dictate the tempo, but drums and bass lock in with them. Nothing is pushed or pulled. The tempo on the track I listened to started at 98bpm went to 104 towards the middle, but no one instrument seemed to make this happen. If you're having problems with the rhythm section keeping together, try facing each ...


2

Typically the rhythm guitarist, drummer and bass player set the groove. If they're not locking, then the drummer and bass player should set the groove, especially for R&B. The drummer, bassist and guitarist should all play on the same place within those cute little Gaussian curves that are the beat. What I hear in your question is that the rhythm ...


1

I agree with others here to learn shapes first. There are plenty of resources on the internet to get diagrams. You will be learning the fretboard as you go along learning shapes. The shapes as you will see connect across the fretboard. Also, you will build muscle memory in the hand and it will be easier to solo in the future.


0

The guitar is very block/box orientated, and lends itself well to learning in shapes. You'll need to know notes (some), in order to find start points, but I feel there is no need to know each note as you play it. The reference against the previous and following notes is more important.


2

If you think you are 'already sorted' with classical guitar, you must be a guitar God. Can you seriously pick up a piece by Bach, transpose it to guitar while sight reading and play it perfectly? I have been playing for 13 years and my daily practice looks more or less like this: Warmup with scales (major and harmonic minor modes, plectrum and no plectrum) ...


5

This first part applies to all the string instruments, not just the guitar. Most people that play guitar/bass/double bass etc learn the certain shapes that each scales consist of. This has a great benefit: you can easily transpose to any other key. For instance, if you know the shape for a major scale, and you practice it in C major, you can easily go to ...


2

As a formula, it may be better as 1,2,b3,3,5,6.Which actually translates to the same as that of the minor blues, but displaced by a minor third - 3 semitones. (Or, starting at note 6 from the above formula and making IT note no.1, the key note). This will then work for all keys. So, in your speak, it's C-D-Eb-E-G-A.


2

I have not observed this issue in my playing so I tried to replicate it on my acoustic guitar. I found that if I let the string ring longer and snap my hammer finger down sharply, I can hear the higher pitched sound you mentioned. But when I hammer on immediately after plucking the string, I don't need to hit the string with as much velocity to get the ...


4

This tends to happen when there is no dampening on the nut side of the fretboard; for instance, if you're hammering on from an open string. Generally speaking, when you're performing a hammer-on, the finger on the lower fret remains pressed down while your other finger hits your target fret. This tends to be more common on acoustic guitars where the proper ...


4

Try to concentrate the “hammer energy” on the bridge-side fret. The finger should always be rather closer to that fret, not in the middle between two frets; for a hammer-on it can be a good idea to actually aim right on top of the fret you want, and only then pull the finger back a bit to avoid damping the note.


4

Normally that sound should not be picked up by the pickup. That being said, you should try muting it with left hand fingers "behind" the fretting finger, assuming you're not hammering on with the first finger. If you are hammering on with the first finger, I'm not sure what to do beside try to change the fingering somehow so you are hammering on with a ...


-1

The difference is - they sound different. Neither method aims for "accuracy" in the way a purist stereo recording of acoustic instruments in a beautiful-sounding room does! The idea is to grunge up the guitar sound. Don't worry about how closely one method copies the other, just about whether you like the result.


1

If you ignore the four conductor circuit diagram and treat the pickup as a single coil, I'm sure it will work fine. Try looking at the Gibson example on Wikipedia's guitar wiring article, with the one humbucker wired to a volume and tone pot. (Note this diagram is more complicated than you need. You need to look at just one pickup and its volume control.) ...


1

Amalgamating the answers and comments. Play standard in open chord form at the nut end of the fingerboard, with a Spider capo fixed on the 8th fret. With it there, but none of the cams operational, all the 'open' chords will still work. At chorus time, flick all the cams on, and assume 'barre' chords, which will be E and A shape, I guess, with the capo being ...


1

imagine a guitar with lots of strings all tuned exactly a 4th apart. if we map the intervals of a major scale onto a portion of this imaginary guitar we get something like this - where the numbers represent degrees of an (unspecified) major scale. ----------------------- | | | | | 7 3 6 2 5 1 4 ----------------------- 7 3 6 2 5 1 4 | | | | | ...


0

One thing that really locked everything in place for me was the idea that all the scales are essentially interleaved arpeggios (in the loosest sense of the terms) of a chord played at different positions on the fretboard. For A, you have open A, then you have the "barred G pattern for A", where the open A is the barre for the G pattern. This G pattern is ...


1

For me: I started with the good old pentatonic & got used to playing that, then quickly added notes 2 & 6 into my memorised "shape" on the fretboard to turn it into a fulsome minor scale. Move the same fret pattern down 3 frets and it struck me that this is the same set of notes as a major scale in the original key. OR you can just sharpen the ...


2

I agree that you need further medical advice; in the mean time, I've used the flattened first segment of my little finger as a mini-bar for "A-form" chords for years (it's just the right length to cover 3 strings, combined with a normal first finger 6 string bar.) Naturally, this works best if your guitar's neck action is not too high and uncomfortable.


3

There are no specific chords you should learn next. I would recommend finding a song you want to play with different chords and learning that. It would also give you context for the chords and what sounds good with what.


20

Yes. You can use a spider capo for this kind of things. Generally, it is used for alternate tunings. Like if you only want to capo 2 or 3 strings, but you can capo all 6 of them and then remove all of them. Here is a video review: ...


3

If you want to learn how to do your own setup on acoustic and electric guitars, you should not rely on a random collection of videos you find on YouTube. This is not going to give you a comprehensive answer. If you want a "detailed description of how to do these", you should purchase a textbook on guitar setup and repair, and study it. The textbook will ...


3

Unless the chord is notated as B/F# you really don't need to worry about the 6th string (fret 2 = F#) which can (or maybe should?) be omitted from the chord. The most important note to fret cleanly is the D# on the 2nd string fret 4 because it is the only note that is not doubled. Even if you only play the 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings fretted at the 4th fret ...


1

The best way is to have a cheap guitar or three around that you don't need to have working properly all the time that you can learn on. I would definitely start by learning to setup and maintain a cheap electric guitar with a bolt on neck as they are the most forgiving. One thing you wil want to do a lot of early on is measurement and calibration of the ...


0

No image! But, no, as the only 3 affected by that 2nd fret finger are the 6th, 5th and top strings. the other 3 are pressed on 4th fret, so anything lower will make no difference.


3

Conveniently, guitars are set up so major scales can be played using all four fingers on four consecutive frets, to play two octaves. Minor scales can be played similarly, with only one slip down a fret on the 3rd string. All this assumes you start on the bottom string, and work up to the same fret on the top. The obvious (ubiquitous?) scales that work well ...


0

What I did to get to know my instrument was to learn all the modes that start from the Ionian mode (Major scale). Go to a simple tonality, like C or G (the low notes on guitar) and play the Ionian mode (In guitar you can play it for two octaves in one (or a bit more) position), ascending and then descending. After you've played it, go to the next mode, ...


4

Even though Shevliaskovic's suggestion that this could be an Em9 (no 5) chord is theoretically correct, it is hardly ever used that way. If that voicing were used as an Em9 chord there would be no reason to indicate that the low E string should be muted (note the cross on the low E string). With the note D in the bass, the Em9 chord would have its seventh in ...


1

As Tim describes, there are two different skills here: picking accuracy (don't hit strings you don't need) and muting (don't let strings ring out if it's too hard to avoid hitting them). And you should practice both. Good exercises for picking accuracy are: scales, arpeggios, root-chord-root-chord strumming patterns. Good exercises for muting: funk -- ...


1

Lots of chords played on guitar are not played using all 6 strings. Mainly it's down to voicing, with a sometimes odd sounding note at the bottom, and sometimes it's because a string somewhere in the middle needs muting, as a good note cannot be found to play on it. Chords can have as few as 3 notes (some argue 2 constitutes a chord), so 3 can be an answer ...


1

To play any song, you would need to get beyond "learning chords" because there comes a point where it just doesn't work like that any more. However, there are thousands of songs you can accompany with three chords: A root, a fourth and a fifth. The easiest set like this is D, G, A. | D | G | A | This lets you sing lots of folk, rock'n'roll songs etc. ...


-2

I would learn all the basic chords (C, D, E, F, G, A, B)


2

This could be Em 9 without the 5th, which is a common note to omit, with the 7th on the bass; third inversion. So, if you played it in root position, it would be: E,G, (B which is omitted),D,F#.


9

This is actually a really nice way to notate guitar. The chord symbol on top tells you what chord to play for the bar, and the tab itself is just indicating the arpeggio pattern. So for example, in the first full bar, you finger a x32010 C major chord, then play the strings indicated as eighth notes (which are indicated by the eighth note beams). Then ...


3

I'd read it like this: Make the chord like the first line says. Then the x's tell you which string to play, starting from the 6th string in the bottom to the 1st in the top. The bars uniting the notes are to give you the tempo of these notes. The numbers on the top of the bars are a mistery to me.


4

Generally, it's good to practice everything everywhere. This helps you get to know the instrument you're playing better (this doesn't apply only to guitar) and helps you learn how to transpose the songs. But, if you still cannot play a song in a certain key, there isn't much point in transposing it. It might help if you transposed it into something that had ...


0

I use the method I got from the 'Recommended methods' section here. It's based on using the same reference note all the time, e.g. high E. So given that this is in tune, you adjust: B string by checking against the 5th fret E and open high E G string by the 9th fret E and open high E D with 14th fret E (I tend to use 2nd fret E) A with 7th fret E Low E by ...



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