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0

I think maybe what the OP is referring to is the return to the V chord briefly before beginning the next 12 bar phrase. So, in this song, you have this typical phrase construction: I-I-I-I IV-IV-I-I V-IV-I-X The "X" at the end of the phrase (which happens shortly after 0:28) starts on the I chord and changes to the V (dominant) quickly, which might ...


0

I've listened through the whole track and, basically, there is no bridge. A bridge is usually a middle section of a tune that lasts for 8 bars and often changes key. Pride and Joy sticks to the 12 bar format with the usual basic three chords that you mention. The only deviation in the arrangement is what are known as breaks: when the bass and drums cut out. ...


1

Common name is a pause sign. In 'proper' music (written notes), it means hold the note for longer than the note indicates, as in a four beat note may be held for 5/6 beats. Usually found at the end of a piece, where the last chord lasts longer than it is marked, signifying 'the end'.Not usually found in the middle of a piece.


6

It's called a fermata. It means hold the chord for good long moment. If there are other instruments playing, they will all stop and hold the note together. The whole movement of time in the song takes a pause, just stretching out the single beat.


2

Adding to Dom's answer,yes, there will be more efficiency in changing chords, using barre chords. In a piece with quite a few changes, it's often possible to move from any chord to the next by moving two frets maximum, sometimes one fret, and even no frets at all.Take a simple 3 chord song in A. Play A on the 5th fret barre, with an 'E' shape. Same barre ...


1

Go down to your local hardware store and try various hex wrenches until you find the one that fits snugly. Then buy it there.


6

Yes, if you move a barre chord to a different fret it becomes a different chord. The one you have used to get the F chord sounds like the E-shaped barre chord. There are a total of 5 different barre chord shapes and they are all based on the open shapes of chords. As you can see in the picture above, these are the 5 open chords and thus each can be ...


2

Your guitar appears to be a nylon-strung classical guitar, and as such may not have a truss rod. However, it's worth going on to answer the question in general: Unless you have a very unusual guitar, a truss rod tool is either a hex key or a hex socket. These are common fittings in all kinds of fields, not just musical instruments: bikes, self-assembly ...


3

Well, you have two choices I guess. 1) Use a pair of calipers to determine the precise size wrench needed for the specific guitar you own right now. Or find out through some other means (e.g., by contacting the manufacturer and asking what wrench size is needed). 2) Buy a multitool which will have the right size for now and also probably for any other ...


1

The last time I played a guitar with a Floyd Rose is long ago, but I do remember having some unwinding problems in the beginning, too. Then I discovered, that some strings come with a bit of "unwinding protection" at the end (I don't know, if that's its official purpose, but what I mean, is a short, somewhat thicker part). The trick for me was buying the ...


3

It's not going to make much difference on a classical guitar. Optimum would be that the strings follow straight lines over the nut to the tuner capstan, as there is slightly less stress sideways.So, if possible, finish the windings so that the string is as straight as it can be. On electric guitars, with vibratos, it does help if this is the case.This was a ...


0

My suggestion for harmonics in general is to pick/pluck/strum closer to the bridge. I've always found harmonics are louder and easier the closer to the bridge you are. And, as with many things, the key is practice.


1

All these answers are great already. Just one thing to add: the higher the harmonic you want to play, the closer to the bridge you should pick. You get maximum volume from a harmonic when you play exactly midway between nodes (because this is where the string "wants" to vibrate the most); you get little or no response if you pick at another node-point ...


11

(Just in case of any confusion, this answer was originally in response to a duplicate question about pinch harmonics used by Billy Gibbons of ZZTop - thanks for the merge, Dr Mayhem!) These are probably pinch harmonics. In which case, they are not produced by a particular amp or effects setting, but are produced by the picking hand while playing (although ...


1

I can tell you what I did .. Before I started learning, I found that I liked the Rolling Stones, Dire Straits (they were v popular at the time) and Jimi Hendrix, among other types of music. It was around 1984. I learnt guitar riffs.. Under My thumb (Stones), Machine Gun (Hendrix), Whole Lotta Love (Led Zep) - these tunes stand out in my memory of learning ...


0

If you want to play fast, practice slow. Real slow to a metronome. And then count 1/8 notes against it: 1 and 2 and ... Then triplets. Then 16ths. Use this for scales and arpeggios. Eventually move to cross picked across the neck, one note on each string, with the pick alternating.


2

With five years playing under your belt you hopefully know about starting any thing slowly at first then building speed up once you've got it correct. But have you tried doing 1 minute drills where you play as fast as you can- short chord transitions, arpeggios, etc.. not worrying so much about accuracy while counting how many times you played thru your ...


2

I also learned from the scratch and everything I know about the guitar I know from the internet. The things I used: Guitar Pro (version 5.2) it's a cool application. You can use it to read notes, create compositions and learn how to play many things created by other people in this app. You can download it for free. http://ultimate-guitar.com it's a website ...


4

Do you think B.B. King's guitar sound is anything like Stevie Ray Vaughan's? They're both labeled as "blues". Do you think Jimmy Page's guitar sound is anything like Brian May's? They're both labeled as "classic rock". Do you think Randy Rhoads's guitar sound is anything like Dimebag Darrell's? They're both labeled as "metal". Forget about comparing ...


1

Typically you already have mids prominent when you play through an amp as electric guitar amps respond more in the mid range than the low or high range. A lot of mids when you're using distortion will make the sound "muddy", which people like for some stuff. I use a BOSS GE-7 equalizer as a clean volume boost and also to shape my tone. I usually have it ...


2

The eq settings on the amp are usually close to the same on Rock and other styles. Metal can go to extremes by cutting mids. The mids usually are more in control of the overall tone. I usually have Bass - 7, Mid - 6, Treble -7 for Classic Rock and Blues. Play a chord and let it sustain while turning one knob up and down to hear the difference. If you were ...


-2

Quite frankly, I never understood equalizer presets. Your disks should have been mastered properly by a professional with the will of the artists or producer in mind. If they wanted you to hear more bass, they would have pumped the bass when mastering. Your equalizer, however, can be set according to your listening conditions: mainly the characteristics of ...


1

All of those can put adverse pressure on the truss rod of the guitar and cause bowing. the reason being that the temperature change with the seasons, in combination with the humidity, can cause the wood to expand and contract causing bowing. when adjusting to a new string gauge go have your truss rod adjusted to the new tension. my best recommendation is ...


1

It worked for Jimi !! Being left-handed, your L.H. fingers are probably more 'dextrous' than the other hand's.So fret wise, you're going to be o.k., as you've already found. Strumming is an arm movement more than a finger movement, so your right arm should cope. However, with jazz, you may well find yourself not strumming as you would for, say, a pop ...


1

I taught myself guitar. As a result, I started off with crappy technique that caused injury to my hands. In order to stop the pain, I went back to the beginning and analyzed my personal ergonomics and then changed my technique. What I found worked for me was: Practicing fretting notes cleanly: My fretting fingers are close to the frets and press as ...


0

I am 55 years old and have developed these same isues over time. First and foremost a vist to your doctor. Clebrex (or miloxicam generic celebrex and not costly) has worked very well for me. Use good non greasy deep heat muscle rub on your hands and wrists before you play. Secondly, a little larger guitar neck like say a les paul verses a Gretsch or Fender ...


4

In addition to Grey's excellent answer, there's also hybrid picking, where a pick and fingers are used. Often, the pick is held between thumb and index finger (sometimes middle as well) and the remaining fingers can be used to pick strings, usually individually. This works well when the alternative is string skipping, as the hand doesn't need to be moving up ...


6

A strumming pattern is a technique for playing a rhythmic pattern. Most simple rhythms are best played with the strumming pattern you describe because this is the best way to keep your rhythm accurate. As for picking patterns, it is not silly at all. It is crucial that you learn the most mechanically efficient way to execute sequences. For instance: ...


0

Get a hold of "George Van Eps Guitar Method" - buy it, find it on the interweb thing, check out triad exercises on ewetube. It is the ultimate foundation guide for triads that will open up the fretboard and unlock your hidden potential, the enabler to show music aficionados why you are on this planet.


1

Heads are the amplifiers, the actual part of the signal chain that increases the power of a signal. Speakers convert that power to moving some physical apparatus (e.g. sheet of paper) that vibrates the air, making sound. So like Bob said, people don't put heads on top of amps, but rather speakers. The amp itself doesn't make sound. In fact, if you're using ...


2

It depends quite a lot on the context: The third above a melody is two notes above it in the scale, it could just be you're not completely clear on where the melody goes next. If you're singing with someone, the third is quite a good place to be to find harmonies. Remember, too, that a key is not a range of pitches, it's a selection of notes. Which key ...


1

Sounds like you're singing a harmony. But - to do that, there is usually a voice already singing the main tune. Harmonies often work in thirds - think Everly Brothers, et al.It's not wrong, but something inside is making you sing another part apart from the main tune.Some people do this naturally, others work for ages to be able to do it.Not all tunes lend ...


5

Another couple of reasons why someone would choose head/speaker over combo : a comparable combo usually weighs more than one or the other, so is harder to hump around (poor old roady).Heads go wrong more frequently than speakers, so carrying a spare head to a gig is better than taking two combos. In defence of the combo, one doesn't need to remember the ...


8

A head is simply the name for an amplifier without a speaker. Your friends won't have heads on top of amps, they'll have heads on top of speakers (with the head driving the speaker). The "basic guitar amp" you have at the moment, is probably an amplifier and speaker combined in one cabinet. These are commonly called combos. There are several reasons for ...


1

I don't know how much historical instruments play into the numbering scheme, but various types of lutes had rather wild collections of bass and resonance strings while the melody strings were mostly standard. Numbering from melody to bass would make it easier to write string indications that stay useful when switching between different lute types.


4

I grabbed a dozen or so Google Images and none look even close. All the SG510 heads have a big logo and different font as Edouard pointed out. Unless your axe was heavily, and badly, refinished, you're stuck.


2

I could reword the first phrase of your question: Considering that pitch goes down from high E to low E through all 6 strings (...) When pitch is concerned, we never really consider "low" to come before "high", or the other way around. Leftaroundabout made a good comment about that: when guitars were still held in a more upright position, the strings ...


3

I use a Boss Micro-BR for doing this kind of practice. (At the moment, I just select a random page from a Real Book, record the chords, and then use this backing to sight-read the melody over and practise some improvisation.) The recording quality of the Micro-BR isn't that amazing, but the functionality is. Off the top of my head: 4 track multi-track ...


3

The Boss RC-30 is a very good looper that has an XLR input for a microphone and stereo/mono input for when you get your electro-acoustic. It is a dual track looper, with some effects, 99 memory slots, up to 3 hours recording. You can also connect this to your computer and save/load your loops. For putting down a phrase and then playing over it etc, I would ...


3

I realize some people will probably not like this answer, but I am going to say it anyway: I am a very strong believer in simplicity for recording short jams. You need to have a method to get a rough draft recording down very quickly without much thought. Therefore, I highly recommend simply starting out with a tape recorder, digital meeting/voice ...


2

If your amp has a "line out" or headphones jack, then you should be able to connect that to the audio interface. Note that usually this means that the output is low impedendence, and the amount of pre amp gain that you'll need is lower than you'd need for plugging the guitar straight in (the amplifier is providing some initial amplification). The same ...


4

If the output jack is labeled line out it means it can be plugged into any line-level input, as those found in audio interfaces, so you should be safe. If your interface is "pro" grade, it can have Mic inputs and "Hi-Z" (or Instrument) inputs too, so check if it's the case and make sure you plug into the line inputs. Also, keep in mind that unless the ...


0

On some guitars, it is possible to cause the fingerboard to separate from the neck by over-tightening the truss-rod(s).


2

Some more tips from Jazzology: Here are some notes that can be added to a chord to give a more 'jazzy' sound. Major triad: add 6th and 9th add M7 and 13 add #11 to either of the above for extra dissonance Minor 7th (works as ii): add 9 add 11 and/or 13 above the 9th for extra dissonance Minor triad (works as i): add 6 and 9 add M7 add 9 and/or 13 ...


2

I'm 100% taught to play guitar by the great and almighty internet. Check out Marty Schwartz. He's great for beginners! Have fun :)


1

Have you considered using a Passive Direct Box? http://www.digiflexcables.com/2/en/products.htm Like the first one in the list: DPDI Direct Box! It reduces unwanted buzz sounds making the sound clearer. That is the one I use for my music projects. I plug it to either my guitars, synthetizers or other equipment!


1

If a guitarist has a mix of several playing styles, I am afraid that you will not be able to learn this as if it were one composite style. Rather, it would be good practice to learn all these styles, and then try to understand how he combines them, so that you can mimic this. This sounds like an extreme lot of work, but your understanding of these styles ...


0

I would suggest loading sections of his music into a looper and then looping it at half-speed or quarter-speed while you try to play along.


3

One of my favourite guitar players - Tuck Andress, outlines all methods of picking a excellently on his site. Be sure to read through it and try it all out. He outlines each method of holding the pick, finding the angle of picking, rotation vs up-down motion, as well as thumb-only (ala Wes Montgomery) and pure old school classical fingerstyle technique and ...


1

You may want to explore my collection of chords and supporting information. What makes this uncommon (unique?) is the fact that this collection of guitar chords illustrates and functionally identifies the component chord voices, rather than just indicating a marker to "put your finger here". This collection is almost completely comprised of movable chords -- ...



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