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0

A chord typically consists of 3 notes: so theoretically you only need 3 fingers (and three strings) to play a chord. But most guitars have 6 strings, so other chord notes are played twice on multiple strings. It will probably not be possible for you to learn to play guitar the most common way. I would suggest to learn how you can decompose chords into ...


3

I think a simple solution would be to switch hands. Take a left handed guitar* and play like that. The two webbed fingers won't be an issue if you use them to hold a pick. If you've never learned guitar before, it would be easier to learn to play a left handed guitar. If you had gotten used to playing the guitar, changing to a left handed guitar would be a ...


1

If you play the low G with finger 3 (L.H.) you can then play the F on the D string with finger 4. If you play the F with what I call "lazy technique", by putting the fourth finger on slightly flat, it will touch the open G and stop it ringing. While you do this you keep the third finger pressed down on the low G. To be honest though, it doesn't matter if ...


0

From how I understand it, you play the G(low)-G(middle)-B chord (G major without the 5th) and keep it for half the measure, and then change the middle G to F, pretty much like you said. You don't 'silence' it, but you keep it for a shorter duration; while you keep the low G and B for 2 beats, you keep the middle G for only 1 beat, then change it to F, which ...


1

The name for this technique is rasgueado.


0

I'm a left handed guy with nearly 30 years of right handed guitar playing/teaching experience. I've always wondered if I should have learned leftie style. When learning it feels strongly that the fretting hand is the business end. But as you progress you learn what makes the difference between an OK player and a great player with individual style is the ...


2

I would actually say that the opposite is true, namely, that study of music theory is what matters, and that even if you don't practice sight reading (though you probably should), it's the study of theory that will make the biggest improvement in your sight reading compared to anything else. Sight reading is a tricky thing to do, there is quite a lot of ...


0

To play jazz, you need to understand chords (harmony), which major and minor keys these are derived from, and how to voice these chords on your instrument. You need to understand the theory. This is the only thing you need at gigs. People generally don't take sheet music to gigs, they take lead sheets which just give you the chords and melody (so if you ...


0

There's only one way you can learn theory without knowing how to read music: a teacher explains and shows you. So you can get this either with in-person lesson (teacher sitting next to you) or online video lesson. That's it.


0

There's a key difference in string gauges. Under the same tension, a thinner gauge has less mass and it can move more easily when it receives an impulse, as opposite to a thicker gauge. In thinner strings, more harmonics are generated because, aside from the fundamental vibration, smaller harmonic vibrations occur on the string more easily. That makes for a ...


2

Some additional details. There is a very small change in pitch due to the change in tension that occurs when the string is fretted. This change in tension varies along the neck, generally larger changes further up (away from the nut) the neck. This change is small enough that it is usually imperceptible in single note playing; however this difference does ...


5

All else being equal, a thicker string will damp out transverse vibrations more rapidly because it experiences more drag (inter-molecular deformation) per unit length. (See section 4.6 of [not my work] http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~djmorin/waves/transverse.pdf.) (If we consider strings made of different materials or under different tensions, this rule ...


2

The other two answers are true however it seems your question is about sounding a unison as opposed to replicating one sound on a different string, even though you pointed out string thickness as a possible reason for the sound you are noticing. What happens when a string vibrates is that it actually stretches from side to side or up and down depending on ...


13

Technically speaking two notes with the same pitch have the same frequency as the fundamental. However this does not explain why two notes of the same frequency also called unisons, sound different on strings of different diameters or lengths or both. The guitar and the entire orchestra string family as you may know have numerous unisons (unlike the piano). ...


1

So the difference between the quality of two notes that are the same pitch (two different strings, or even with two different instruments) is not in the frequency necessarily (though my guitar is always a bit out of tune...) but rather the overtones each string produces. I don't know exactly how to mimic that but read into the overtone series - maybe bassier ...


0

anything with a midi out port. So pretty much any keyboard. I've never messed with a midi guitar, but if it's got midi then it'll work. My guess is the PS3 guitar doesn't come with midi out as there's an adapter being sold for it to do midi: http://www.amazon.com/PlayStation-Rock-Band-MIDI-PRO-3/dp/B0042B3EOM If it is standard midi out it'll work. But ...


1

Adding to Ben's great answer. Learn the chord shapes all over the neck. An 'E' shape gives you the tonic on the top string. So does a 'G' shape. A 'C' and 'D' shape give you a third on the top, and an 'A' shape will find the 5th on top. Those notes make up the major chord, which will give some of the main notes for most tunes. Playing them on the top string, ...


2

First of all it takes a while to develop your ear and some pointed practice definitely helps. The short answer is use the tools at your disposal - usually your ear and maybe notation/tablature if you can find it for free/on the cheap. With that said it is GREAT practice to transcribe the melody by ear (Using looping software ain't cheating in my book but ...


1

A guitar pickup in 99% of all guitars including strats is a single coil of wire which senses all strings at the same time. Some pickups use individual magnets for each string, a fender Stratocaster for instance, and some use a single magnet underneath the pickup but have metal slugs or screws directing the field of sensitivity towards the strings, such as a ...


0

It's subjective. Some people just seem to have inbuilt good timing, others, who've played for years, don't seem to notice a skipped beat, an added beat, slowing down, etc. And for those, a metronome probably won't help. I've tried drum machines with them, and they didn't help either.Generally they're folks that play by themselves for long periods. It ...


0

You're definitely on the right track. Modifying the tempo of whatever you're working on is crucial to developing your skills as a guitar player. Playing with a click (the metronome) is very important in developing what I call your "inner metronome". If you can't play on beat, then when you play with a band or have to perform by yourself your tempo will be ...


4

Swap a string by putting your top string in place of the second. If you take it off carefully and put it onto the second post, and wind it more times, it can still go back on properly, although a new set of strings isn't extortionate. If this string is still quiet, it's the pick-up, although it's doubtful all three have the same problem. More likely it's ...


3

Unless it is an acoustic guitar string (nylon or wound with non-magnetic material) or clearly not vibrating, it's the pickup that's broken: any wiring possibly connected to the strings is just to reduce hum, not change the signal level. The pickup reacts perfectly fine to an entirely unconnected string if it is an electric guitar string rather than an ...


0

Learning music theory without sight reading is like learning poetry without reading. Sight reading is not essential to music theory, but scores are the written language in which the music theory has been laid down. Now with a guitar, "sight reading" mostly describes a reproductive skill, like being able to recite a text you did not know before. It is not ...


0

Yes - I compose orchestral music as a hobby, but I don't play any instruments. So, yes, technically you can learn theory without knowing how to sight read


1

Sight reading is an extremely rare skill which is mostly used by high level performers auditioning a piece they have never seen for a part in a musical or band. For nearly all other players, it is unrealistic to attempt to play a piece you cannot easily sing or with which you are unfamiliar. The main value of reading music is NOT to play it the first time ...


0

Well, you asked how to prevent this in the future. You need to build those muscles back up, preferably stronger than they were before the injury, without causing muscle strain/damage. How do you do this? Just do your guitar stretches!!! Do your stretches!!! And do them well. If your fingers and arms do not feel limber (appropriately lubricated) before ...


2

It is important to be able to read music to some extent. But the ability to sight read, which means to be able to pick up the music and just play it, is not all that essential. I can sight read a single vocal line, but in theory classes, we used complex scores that there was no way I could ever sight read them. In fact, sight reading was part of a different ...


1

I feel that I may be missing something if I skip sight reading I think so. Understanding (and being confortable with) traditional music notation is very useful, and specially in combination with the understanding of the theory (scales, chords, etc). For example, you can detect at first sight the tonality of a piece, and spot quickly the chromatic notes, ...


1

How I prevent it from coming back? To build on atoth's answer and his first point about relaxing your hand and arm: I feel it is worth mentioning to all others who come and see this question, the possibility of changing your seated guitar playing position to help in the prevention of these sorts of problems. Having started with a classical guitar and ...


1

Whilst agreeing with most of Shev's answer, I feel that sight reading is a lot more straightforward on a keyboard type instrument.For each note on the stave, there is only one place to play it. Thus it makes more sense, and the 'geography' of a melody is simpler to translate onto the keys. With a guitar, there are sevceral different places to play the same ...


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


-2

At the end of the day it's really a matter of preference to the composer. Most of the responses that I've read claim the second example is 'right' or 'easier to read' but those are truly opinions. It is my opinion that the first example is preferable, and that's the one I'd use. It has to do as much with how I was taught to read sheet music as it does the ...


5

Here's a common chart showing how the notes break down: Notice how each row is a full measure in 4/4. The general rule is that a note can span its direct children, or one of its children and one of its nephews. That is, a quarter note can span the 2nd and 3rd eighth notes, but not the 4th and 5th. A dotted note can only borrow from its sibling, not its ...


0

This is exactly the order you should go in: A Minor Pentatonic, A Major, A Minor, A Harmonic Minor. Spend about a month on each one, practicing 10-15 minutes per day. Look them up online, and then draw the positions out yourself on regular lined paper. Play the scale slowly, up and down one position at a time, using a metronome set at 60 BPM. Use ...


8

If you are referring strictly to music written obeying to traditional rhythmic conventions (with rational time signatures and regular/even division), then your second example is more suitable. Please keep in mind that the first example is not wrong, but the second will make sight-reading much easier, as our own expectations when seeing a piece in 4/4 make us ...


3

The ideal is to keep each beat self-contained, so the second is preferrable.In 4/4 it's certainly best to keep each half of the bar separate, so anything which goes between beats 2 and 3 are shown as tied.It's easier to read, and the ties actually make you aware that the tune is syncopated.The same thing should happen in 6/8 too, which is effectively two ...


24

Yep, the second one is far better for precisely the reason you say. A general rule is that you shouldn't have dotted-notes that start on an off beat and carry through the next beat. There are exceptions even to this rule, but showing the underlying beat structure of the meter is paramount in the vast majority of situations. Elliott Carter is an example of ...


1

But the C7 (or any 7 chord) is based off of the major scale. It's the V degree of the major scale. So for C major, the V is G7. This is because the V is the only degree that has a major 3rd but a minor 7th. The 7 chord is also known as a dominant chord (so the V degree is known as the dominant of the scale). Based on the phrasing of your question ("the 7th ...


6

The most correct notation for a C7 chord would be C E G Bb and not C E G A#. Note that both Bb and A# are practically the same, but A is the 6th of C whereas B is the 7th of C. Those notes that sound the same but are written different are called Enharmonic notes. So, if you had a chord with these notes: C E A#, then that would be a C augmented sixth chord, ...


2

I would also question the assertion that heavier strings --in and of themselves-- increase sustain. Indeed they have more mass --which implies more inertia to keep the string moving. But this ignores or discounts the opposing tensile force of the string material itself which resists stretching from resting to extended position as the string vibrates. So, ...


3

E♭ is three semitones above C. So you should put the capo on the third fret. Some of the other answers are quite thorough, but it is really a simple answer!


1

I think I know exactly what you mean, so I will just give a simple answer in case you are confused by the others (but I highly recommend studying them, anyway). The answer is to place the capo over the 3rd fret. This makes your "C Chord shape" (what you would play to get a C chord should there be no capo at all) be an Eb chord. Thus, you can easily ...


0

I cannot recommend the neunaber WET reverb enough. If you are looking for a post-rock style reverb, this one is hard to beat. It goes from slight shimmer to ghost trails to whale songs. http://neunaber.net/products/wet-mono-reverb-v4


1

Basically, there are four criteria: Does it sound good? Does it feel good? Does it work good? Does it look good? The first is most important. Go by your own ears, but be aware that as a new player, your ears are not well-developed. If you only intend to play by yourself or accompanying a singer, then test it in a quiet environment, but if you're going to ...


2

Simple, completely effective answer: For Eb, don't use a capo. Rather, lower the tuning of each string. Re-tune the strings, low to high, Eb, Ab, Db, Gb, Bb, Eb. Then play the regular chord shapes that you already know.


2

I think the other answers are good, but wanted to condense the most important bit into one answer. You just have to count the semitones. Here are all the notes, and the number of semitones they are away from A. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A D is five semitones up from ...


6

Although your question is a little ambiguous, I'm guessing that you want to play music written in Eb, using chords in C, but keeping the music sounding in Eb. So, you put the capo on fret 3 and rewrite all your chords three semitones lower. However, just giving you this answer won't help you understand how to work out where to put a capo should you need to ...


9

This depends upon what you mean by "music is in the key of…" and "I want to play it in the key of…". If you mean that you want to play chords written in the key of C and have them sound in the key of Eb, put the capo on fret 3. Eb is three semitones higher than C (C-C#-D-Eb). (This seems likely.) If you want to play chords written in the key of Eb and have ...


5

There are many things to consider when buying any guitar. Here are my important factors: price action/playability construction materials sound when plugged in sound when unplugged (I play almost always plugged in, so this is less important) Takamine have a great range of cheap guitars that sound amazing and have great playability. Check out the D series. ...



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