New answers tagged

1

Thicker picks, in and of themselves, do not produce a darker sound. What happens is that thicker picks allow for a more rounded shape which releases a string smoothly, which has the effect of exciting fewer harmonics. You can sharpen a thick pick, which will produce a brighter sound. Thin picks cannot be made dull. That is to say, they cannot be made more ...


2

There are chords that are played one over another, called bichords or polychords in general, such as the Petruschka chord (C over F#). They rarely occur in popular music. The naming convention looks like a fraction, with a horizontal line rather than a diagonal slash between the chord names: I don't think that's what you're after though... You were ...


0

It looks like the idea of these "slapped" chords is to produce the sound of the snare on 2 and 4 in a rock groove -- the "chick" to the "boom" of the bass drum. There are lots of ways to do this; Quevado's style is pretty subtle, but you can be much more rhythmic, like this guy shows: In essence, I wouldn't obsess over the ...


4

The chords that we know and love are produced by basically using 1,3 and 5 of a major or minor scale. Thus, Cmaj. is made up from C,E and G. This odd number pattern continues with 7, 9, 11 and 13, the chords named after the appropriate number. So, the Am7 in your example will be A,C,E and G.Since A is the 1, and the root note, and there's a 7 and a minor 3, ...


0

I increased hz on digi tuner to 450 from standard 440...im a self taught player and a few years later realized how many bad habits i wasnt aware of and are now norm for me....so im not claiming to be certain about anything..but..i found the sound i was looking for, without a capo, with this method.


0

I bought my first guitar and chord book when I was 18, stuffed around for 10 years trying to play (admitting putting in about 100 hrs in total) and learn all chords in the book until they burgaled by home and stole my equipment. I gave up, and 10 years later tried again, with a different approach. I have been at it for a year now, it is a difficult road now ...


0

PRACTICE "It takes a lot of devotion and work, or maybe I should say play, because if you love it, that's what it amounts to. I haven't found any shortcuts and I've been looking for a long time." __ Chet Atkins


0

The best way to start playing guitar is to slowly walk around a piano, looking at it from all sides, and telling it "you are fat and you are ugly". It's important to do that before you start buying the first amplifiers/speakers weighing in excess of 500lbs. So don't get to it too late. Now there is no king's road to musicianship, like there isn't one into ...


1

I ran into the same problem. There are troubleshooting options in the channel settings windows in FL Studio. The only way I was able to get the correct tone (the same that I get in Reaper with Bias) is to select the "Use Fixed Sized Buffers" option in the processing tab.


1

If you can't afford lessons, then you may well start off with some bad habits. That said, rock is a genre which can be accepting of bad technique. YouTube is a good way to begin, but I'd really suggest finding some tracks that you really like and getting the tab for them, and just start playing along. Be aware that a lot of tabs online show a possible way ...


0

I think you are misreading. X is usually used to denote damped strings. So in the first example you'd go from a partial Am (minus the E on the 3rd string) and then as you pop that E on you need to damp the open A in order that when it is played you just hear the damped noise of it being picked, but no note ringing out. It is possible the X could be used ...


3

This is almost entirely down to tradition - early guitars used similar construction to equivalent instruments - lutes, violins etc all had that slot mechanism for the tuning pegs, where you have a slightly tapered tuning peg that is pushed into the hole to tighten. Obviously, with more recent technology, tuning pegs with worm gear mechanism have removed the ...


1

Finger style requires a steady hand, often anchored, so that each finger can move independently, usually one string per finger. Strumming involves a rather different action of the whole arm moving up and down, usually with a pick held between finger/s and thumb. So, the transition is quite stark. I think the only way, if you're not happy strumming like most ...


0

I think it's more psychological than physical actually. Not only need you train your muscles to move fast and get synchronized (which is not really about physical strengths per se, but rather accuracy and precision), but you also need to hear what you play and be able to play (sing) it at the expected speed in your head which most people fail to handle in ...


0

kind of. but the main solution to your riff speed lies out side of the gym. the vast majority of speed problems come from inadequate synchronization, excess tension, inefficient movements, and restrictive form. the kind physical strength associated with speed is usually best practiced on the instrument. what you might be experiencing is an increase of ...


0

I think I've (almost) found a solution, at least for situations involving just one tapping finger. it involves using the palm to mute similar to normal playing. the trick is to instead aiming for the very tip of the tapping finger and pulling off towards the adjacent string, hammer-on very slightly below the string and pull of upwards. i got the idea from ...


2

Two better ways of muting the low E: If your index finger is fretting a note on the A string then scootch the finger over until it's just barely touching the low E. That mutes the string more ergonomically. Better: learn to play subsets of your strings cleanly. This is what I do. Without any muting at all, I can play chords on the string sets: EAD ADG ...


0

That's an interesting technique. I would presume that the optimal mic location would be smack dab in-between the neck and the neck pickup. You'll get a little bit of resonating from the body, and that creamy sweet spot on the strings.


3

I own a Traveler too, although a different model, but no, different strings won't do what you need. Not sure how that video was produced, but any electric guitar will need an amp for any sort of amplitude. While product suggestions are off-topic in this forum, you may want to consider a headphone amp or similar. When I travel, I use a Vox headphone amp - I'...


4

First off, it's an inversion when the lowest sounding note is anything other than the root note of the chord. If you play an A chord with the low E string sounding, then that's an inversion. Second, perhaps in your particular situation and with your guitar, it's hard to notice a difference between letting the low E sound or not when playing an A chord, but ...


0

Consider the so-called five shapes for any given scale. Some of the notes from one position will inevitably be the exact same notes/strings/frets as those from the next position, up or down. So you cannot avoid playing those same notes. All that changes is (maybe) the fingers with which you play those particular notes. There are no rules, to be adhered to or ...


0

Consider watching "cracking the code" on YouTube ... Ultimately, the problem you're facing is what is known as lack of pick-slanting. You're trying to power through with pure muscle strength. Its more about a technique that will allow you slight graze the string when alternate picking. Anyway, it will take time to adjust to this as it is quite different ...


0

Yes! I am a left handed guitarist! And yes i look at right handed diagrams. It is basically identifying your fingers. Remember! the index finger is always number 1, the middle number 2, ring number 3, and pinky 4. You cannot go wrong!!!


0

While tab is a good way to convey the specific notes played in a passage it is not great at getting timing across and as such should be taken with a large grain of salt. Some tab conventions are better than others but if you are trying to learn a specif passage you still need to listen to the original and get to know it to work out which notes are crucial ...


2

In my observations of many guitar players at the many Open Mic events I have attended over the past ten years, I have found that some guitarist tend to strum closer to the fret-board than the bridge. I have also observed that where a guitarist strumming lands on the strings will often vary depending on whether he/she is playing standing with a strap or ...


1

Fingerstyle guitar is awesome, but it's hard to say whether that would be a good fit for you without more detail — I would guess that you don't have the strength or control. However, if you're thinking of playing with your fingernails acting as a pick you can definitely do that! A number of well-known guitarist just use their fingernails, frequently ...


4

Picking near the octave (specifically, an octave above the fretted notes) can produce a neat effect since it emphasizes the second harmonic. However, I find it's better for individual notes or slower glides across the strings than for rhythm strumming. In either case, however, striking the guitar top is poor technique. Even extreme angles of attack ...


3

Take no notice. Press on as you are. There have been plenty of remarkable guitar players who have found stranger ways to play. You sound like you want to play despite having found problems doing it in the 'conventional' way. Good for you. People rest the guitar on their laps and play that way (which I feel is actually more productive, once one's accustomed),...


0

Left mine in a stand that hung by the headstock when it transitioned to summer it caused a slight twist in the headstock. Gave the truss rod a small twist and it corrected some after a week in its case it's mostly back to where it used to be without any affect on tension and intonation. Be careful.


0

The closest I've come to the Rooster clean tone is with using a CE-1 Anolog Chorus from my POD HD500, a EHX Deluxe Electric Mistress Flanger, and a dual amp setup with one of the amps being a Yamaha RA-200 rotating speaker. The chorus and flanger are blended on two paths of my signal (lets call them 'A' & 'B') Then those two signals run through a VOX ...


0

Bro I think I'm starting to have the same issue, no inflammation, but tightness and pain in the forearm below the elbow - I've been stressing about it for the last week and scouring the net for solutions. This video is the best I've found - do the digging in exercises, in and around the areas in your forearm that are tight. Do your stretching as well. I've ...


1

There are a few things to consider, I will go through them one by one. This might be quite a long answer, but I hope it helps! First, take a basic element of music, a melody. Here is the beginning two phrases of Au Clair de la Lune On its own, it sounds okay but we can add an accompaniment to make it sound better. The simplest accompaniment possible ...


-1

If you want to rock right now, then the E minor pentatonic is a great place to start. It's really easy to play, sounds awesome and it's used in a bunch of tunes like Rumble, Shakin' All Over, Back in Black and many, many more. Here's the pattern: That being said, it's not a great place to start if you want to understand what you are doing. Although it ...


1

I cannot for the life of me play chords without creating a dead string by touching neighboring strings. It sounds really twangy when i play and i hate it. I have long nails but a trimmed them really short but i'm still having problems This is normal at the beginning and is one of harder parts of playing chords at first. If you think about it, the ...


0

Learn the seven modes. Basically, most modern music is played within one of those seven modes (essentially seven different scales). The chords for the song are found and created by taking triads found within the mode to dictate whether or not a certain interval's chord is going to be major or minor. Basslines will typically hang around the root notes of ...


2

As others have said in the comments, the answers to your questions can all be found over to the right in the related questions. What has prompted me to post an answer is the talk of "stretching fingers" in your third question. Don't think in those terms. The problem with the G chord probably comes down to finger independence, playing position or both. ...


0

Maybe go to a guitar store and try some different models? 1970s Ovation instruments are idiosyncratic, both in terms of construction and ergonomics. They also don't improve with age, as they are somewhat prone to warping which will raise the action on the neck and possibly cause intonation and fretting issues for the player. I've found that woodshedding on ...


0

I've done some research on YouTube, and find some nice tutorials. For your first question, check out this link For your second question, check out this And for your third question, you need to practice a lot, because it needs time to stretch your muscles. By the way, I think it's a good idea to get a guitar teacher, especially when you start to learn ...


2

I can barely understand what you're talking about, honestly. Whatever it is, I think you need to forget the word "bind". In both exercises, there are two separate lines. In the first, there's a top line that goes: (rest) | E E E | (rest) | (rest) E and a bottom line that goes: A A A | (rest) | A E E | A The second example ...


3

If the strings are properly in place, my guess is that the string is either too tight or too loose. So, instead of the usual E that it's supposed to be, you see a B. Just tune it until it gets to E. Just make sure to understand if you have to loosen it or tighten it. It might help you to find someone who knows how to properly tune a guitar so as to show you....


0

Those are not octaves they are merely three octaves in various positions. The classical guitar generally speaking has a range of three octaves even if there is 72 notes you can play from Low E to 12 fret on high E. So it looks on average each note has two places on the fret board you can play it, even if there is some with three and some with only one.


4

That image only shows three octaves, even though it shows eight different positions on the guitar where one can play an E. The trick of the diagram is that the E notes that are the same color and are connected in the same line are the same note. They are not in different octaves, but exactly the same. So even though there are eight fret positions where you ...


1

There is not always a bass line. There is not always a melody. When there is a bass line, it could be played on any strings of a guitar. When there is a melody, it could also be played on any strings of a guitar. Sometimes only one string is used at a time and only one note is being played. In that case the one could could be both the bass and melody at the ...


0

Assuming there's only the one guitar,the lowest note of the chord is going to be the 'bass' note.Generally it's going to be the 6th or 5th strings, for most keys, but when in D, the lowest note played on guitar is the 4th string open.So, as a basic premise, the bottom 3 strings. Melody is something quite different, and although often played on the top three,...


1

In addition to the other answers, you need to look at your ergonomics, which will not only improve speed but prevent injury. Musicians are small-muscle athletes and get injured without proper technique and warmup. Press a chord voicing on your guitar with your fingers as close behind the frets as possible. Playing one string at a time, lighten your finger ...


3

This question is missing a lot of context. It may be that there is no difference, or it may be that the bass line is played on a bass guitar, or there may be the root note of the chord (which may or may not be 'bass') played on any string (although realistically strings 1 to 4 in order to have two other notes of the chord on strings 5 and 6) There is no ...


1

I would not class this as Spanish style. It doesn't follow any picking rhythms that are really indicative of Spanish or Flamenco. I wouldn't really class it under classical style either. It is a fairly basic fingerpicking style - used in a lot of popular ballads.


1

You should never connect a guitar straight in to a Line-In connection. Line-in is around 1 Volt (in reality, audio signals are rated in dB and line levels can be in a range but 1V is a useful reference point) Guitars output somewhere around 150mV so you really need to put a pre-amp in the chain. A pre-amp will also sort out your impedance matching (which ...


3

Fret wraps (or hair bands, basically anything that can wrap around a fretboard and mute the strings) are used to mute the open strings while performing a tapping passage. They are placed around the strings near the nut of the instrument to prevent the open strings from sounding. This limits the use of open strings during performance. A sponge mute can also ...


0

Whenever learning a new technique it's best to start with slow and deliberate practice keeping a relaxed hand movement. Shake your hand out sideways and with a flapping motion before you start, and at regular intervals to keep from tensing up. It will feel really strange at first, but after a while you'll get the hang of it and it will actually improve all ...



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