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-1

There is ZERO scientific evidence to support the assertion that tuning up to pitch will help a string stay in tune longer than doing the opposite. When tuning a guitar, once your hand leaves the tuning key, the string will be at a certain pitch. The idea that special properties are present because the position and tension of the tuning machine was achieved ...


2

Even if you feel frustrated with your playing now, you can always come back to it. I started playing the guitar in my late teens and could never really get into it, even though I had some solid experience with woodwinds and could already read music. I recently picked it up again in my forties, and I’m already better than I used to be. The main difference is ...


1

I am a 71 year old woman and have played guitar for years. I have had to change techniques over time as the inflammation and pain has gotten worse. I find that playing an acoustic with strings that are close to the fret board is easier for me than playing electric. Also light strings help a lot. I use Agustine light (blue)) Since I can't curve my index ...


0

You can try this stuff I take called "Zyflamend"...its an herbal and it really works. I had arthritis in both of my hands and not only couldnt play the guitar, but doing dishes and other kinds of housework were miserable. I went to a health food store I trust and the vitamin consultant told me about this. So I took it and in about two months my hands stopped ...


1

One thing that might be worth noting that people talk about the characteristics of pentodes and stuff. But in a typical tube amp, one important element with its own saturation and consequently distortion characteristics is the output transformer since tubes operate at voltages and currents unsuitable for most loudspeakers, requiring a transformer for ...


3

If fusion players sound to you like 'not in key' or 'playing random notes', then you're either listening to bad players or you're not yet accustomed to the sounds they use. The latter may also have to do with the development of your musical ear. I suggest to listen to good fusion guitarists (e.g., Alan Holdsworth, John Scofield, Scott Henderson with Tribal ...


1

I've been playing guitar for about 7 years now and I also had difficulties with memorizing chord patterns in the beginning. What I discovered after a while is, that every song has his own movement. When playing a chord, you have to imagine your hand as a single "position" on the guitar neck. I will use the famous chord progression of "Wonderwall" by Oasis: ...


10

I have had to do this with 3 of my guitars, and by far my best results have been from filling the hole with wood glue and then pushing 3 matchsticks in. Once the glue dries, I use a new screw - same width as the old one, but longer. Super glue really doesn't work on wood - you need wood glue, or wood filler.


1

Something which may help is training the process of memorising the chord progressions, for instance you play along with the sheet music or chord chart a few times for just the verse and then look away from the chords and play from memory. Repeat this with each part of the song (verse, chorus bridge etc) Wait a few minutes and then try again. By repeating ...


3

Fusion originated with Miles Davis's "B****** Brew" album. Pat Metheny, Larry Coryell and John Mclaughlin are probably the avatars of fusion jazz, but there are many many other practitioners of the genre, including Martin, Medeski and Wood, Bird Songs of the Mesozoic and the "downtown sound" of Bill Laswell and John Zorn.There are very interesting ideas that ...


2

Caleb Hines' answer is very spot on. It all comes down to ear training. You're also gonna have to identify chords by ear i.e., know when a chord is a minor, a major, and any other voicings. I say this because it's going to be useful in identifying whether a specific chord is a 'I' or a 'II' etc in relation to the song. Interestingly, in my experience I ...


0

Given one string is in tune, and you cannot use a tuner to do the rest, there are three methods I know of. The first is tuning the fretted intervals, the second is tuning the harmonics, and the third is tuning the fourths. To tune the intervals, start with the tuned string, and choose a string adjacent to it. Whichever open string is lower pitched, fret ...


0

I'm a little bit confused by your explanation. Is it supposed to be: 1 2 3 e + a (pattern A, takes 1 second) or 1 2 3 + 4 + (pattern B, takes 1 1/3 second) The two downstrums in a row involve a motion where you move back up over the strings but don't strike them, as you mentioned, so if you're counting every movement of your ...


4

If I understand correctly, you find it easy to remember individual melodic lines (monophony), but have trouble remembering chord progressions (polyphony). I'm going to guess that this problem is related to ear training. You can mentally "hear" a monophonic line, and even mentally "sing" it, which allows you to remember intuitively how it goes. You can then ...


1

At 180 bpm, this means that a metronome needs to be set at 180 and each click will represent one beat. Your rhythm pattern is (I hope) 1-2-3and -4and as in 2 crotchets(1/4) followed by 4 quavers (1/8) notes, or strums.If you count the 1,2,3,4 evenly, the 'and' will go between. The count is in time with the metronome. After that, your theory goes awry. There ...


1

If your guitar has a fat/wide neck, you can try to position your thumb parallel to where your index finger is when barring. Make sure it's flat against the neck, with mostly the force on the joint of your thumb. You can also try changing to lighter string gauges and making sure your guitar has proper setup and action.


1

Also listen to blues artists that you like. Look at transcriptions and you will see the scale parts being used over the chord changes. You will notice in the key of E that the E pentatonic minor scale is used over all chords for tension. Start with a basic minor pentatonic scale in E first then try the major pentatonic to hear the difference of major/minor ...


13

I would actually consider this to be ♭III - IV - I in B major, with the ♭III borrowed from the parallel minor key. In fact, with the ♭III chord, it's somewhat similar in character to one of the "Fellowship of the Ring" themes: I - ♭III - I (in your key, that would be Bmaj - Dmaj - Bmaj). It's the first three chords here. Soundtracks aside, this type of ...


4

Not all the chords in a chord progression need to be strictly in the key. The best way to look at this chord progression is a ♭VII - I - V in the key of E major. The D major chord is a chord that exists in E mixolydian (on of the other modes of E) and it is very common for someone playing in the key of E major to borrow it. The E major and B major are ...


1

In this case I use downstrokes when moving up (towards the high E string), and upstrokes when moving down (towards the low E). This feels most natural to me. However, I'm convinced that there are (and shouldn't be) any rules as to what is right or wrong with such things. You should be open to try all possibilities to see what works best for you. It is true ...


0

If you want to record better sounding guitar tracks, getting an audio interface is the way to go, as others have mentioned. You also want to think about shielding, interference, and turning off electrically noisy overhead lights. However, to say "You can't just use an adapter to plug your guitar directly into your laptop" isn't true. I do this without a ...


0

Let me start off by covering the kinds of picking. As you mentioned, there is playing only down-strokes, called "downpicking". Mainly beginners do this, but some say it's also good to get a certain tone. Next, there's alternate picking -- which usually means playing a down-stroke followed by an up-stroke and maintaining that pattern for every note. ...


0

In E, the minor blues scale notes are E, G, A, Bb, B, D. In A, the minor blues scale notes are A, C, D, Eb, E, G. In B, the minor blues scale notes are B, D, E, F, F#, A. You can see there are some common notes - A, D and E being them.Theoretically, if you only played these, they would work over all 3 chords. But the tune may start to get boring! Not all ...


1

You could use either. When soloing you would want to center the notes you play around the chord being played. The E major and minor pentatonic scale contains the notes E, F#, G, G#, A, B, C#, and D. The notes in a E7 are E, G#, B, and D the notes of an A7 are A, C#, E, G, and the notes of a B7 are B, D#, F#, and A. Of all the notes used in the 3 chords, ...


6

when I plug the cable almost halfway of the adapter's body I can hear sound when I play Sounds like (haw!) a mono-to-stereo problem. Look at the 1/4 inch plug. How many parts? The tip connector and the sleeve right behind the tip? Now look at the 1/8 inch plug. Two sleeves? If yes, you are shorting out one of the channels. Go back to the shop and look ...


6

You can't just use an adapter to plug your guitar directly into your laptop -- the laptop's sound card is expecting either mic-level or line-level sound, whereas your guitar is a very high impedance signal coming in at a very low level (particularly if your pickups are passive). It's possible that your adapter is just faulty, but it's far more likely that ...


1

I agree with many of the above comments. There is no 'critical point' for learning guitar. You may be too old to make it as a member of a band like One Direction but that has nothing to do with the pleasure or learning to play an instrument. I wrote a short article on this here: http://stuartbahn.com/have-i-left-it-too-late/


1

There's nothing wrong with barring all the strings on an A shape chord. In fact, there's nothing wrong with playing all six strings. It just gives the 2nd inversion of the chord, which can sound just as good in some songs. You could consider playing strings 2,3 and 4 in different ways. The most common is with 3 fingers, obviously middle, ring and pinky. ...


1

Anything loose in the guitar or the transducer can cause a ring or snare. This can be as ridiculous as the beginning of a string resting loosely on the top of the guitar. Or the adhesive pad (?) for the transducer might have grown loose spots. Unless the problem is in direct vicinity of the transducer, you should be able to discern it when playing loudly ...


1

An issue not yet mentioned is that in order to be useful, an acoustic guitar has to take energy from the vibrating strings in order to produce sound. Typically this is done by having the strings transfer some energy to the bridge which in turn transfers some to the front of the guitar, which transfers some to the air inside. The vibrating air inside then ...


3

To directly answer your question: Same brand - no. Definitely not. Brands don't make a difference in terms of intonation, and different types of strings (rounds vs flats, for instance) shouldn't have a major effect either. Same gauge - while your bass or guitars won't be affected in terms of intonation by the gauge of the string, it's always worthwhile to ...


1

I do this myself. I learnt on acoustic and electric guitar and never had a pick available (just never owned one!) for about the first 3 years of playing. These days I'm fairly adept ad playing with fingers and with a pick. I'll often use a pick for chugging/strumming so as to save my fingernails getting worn, but when it comes to a solo, I tend to tuck the ...


2

Are you using an alternate tuning? I don't understand how there would be more than minor changes in intonation with changes in string gauge in standard tuning. If you are using an alternate tuning and it's sufficiently alternate--like you're tuning your guitar in fifths--then you're going to have some problems with intonation for some strings and frets ...


2

It's like any musical instrument. They all have separate techniques even vocals. It's muscle memory at the end of the day. Tuning in to the specific movements of you body to act in accordance with the instrument. That is probably why people refer to instruments being a part of you during playing. My advise for learning would be to practice both, but not too ...


-2

Short answer dont. It takes a large amount of effort and practice to get total mastery over the picking action. My advice to you would be to descide on what kind of guitarist you want to be and to stick with the picking action that is best suited for the style of music you want to play. It is better to have one picking action down good that being a jack of ...


0

the first thing to do would be to know your notes, what key they are playing. this will shorten the list of possible chords to search for. second,figure out notes from one phase, write the notes down and see what chords does these notes form in your key then try to play the chord over the song to see if it match. most of the times, you will find that there ...


1

This question is a bit too specific for this site, but since I looked into it I'll post an answer. The guitar you ordered: The guitar they offer as a replacement: So it's quite different guitars, and I think that giving such a guitar in replacement is sort of dishonest of the store. The one you originally ordered is a quite standard model, while the ...


3

I am nearing 40 and just started playing the guitar. I was a fan of music but never wanted to try it out myself. The liking to experiment began after purchasing a guitar for my son who is in his primary level. Afterwards, I feel like it change my lifestyle and the way I look at things. Having said, that I believe, that there is not any age limit to learn ...


6

I do not believe that learning both picking and finger-style concurrently will negatively impact your progress. One of the hardest things to do when learning an instrument is to stay motivated. My advise is: grab onto whatever you can to stay excited and interested. There are so many things you can work on when you have time to practice that, especially in ...


0

The chords you are talking about are called "diatonic" chords: chords whose tones are taken from the scale. If your scale has 7 tones, then you can make at least 7 diatonic chords (depending on how many tones you stack on each chord, or whether you use thirds or fourths to create your chords). The two kinds of scales that "diatonic" is most often used with ...


0

I live near Phoenix, which means our humidity levels are very low most of the year. I have two acoustics plus a semi-hollow body I have to keep humidified. I use hygrometers in both acoustic cases, just to give me a visual reading of the conditions in the case. Plus, in both cases I have three Humidipaks, using their little bags to hang two in the sound ...


1

Like almost everything it's about practice, practice, practice. That aside, there are some other things to consider. What string gauge are you using, and what tuning? Usually quite thin strings are used since less force is needed, which makes it easier to play with precision. Pay attention to your picking hand. Make sure there are no wasted movements. The ...


0

here is a good test for the correct size guitar,hold down a barre chord F on the first fret and extend the little finger to the 5th fret and pluck each string to see how clear it is ...if you can reach the 5th fret comfortably that's fine....if the notes individually are not clear,but you can reach the 5th fret,then that is ok,you just need to practise on ...


6

I started learning guitar at 35. At 37 I started playing professionally. It's not talent, it's not age, it's simply focused, consistent practice. Yeah, you may never be as good as you would have been if you started with guitar at 6. So what? Music isn't a contest, it's a way of living.


0

I recently revisited justinguitar.com, and found that the website fits my needs even if it doesn't fit exactly the requirements I stated above: Categorized from simple to complex, so that I can start with simple single-note melodies and gradually move to chords, etc - The website's lessons start with songs with simple chord palettes to songs with more ...


3

I'm the same way as you. I hate drills, they bore me to tears. So I don't do drills. Instead what I do is figure out a way to practice that's actually performance. So, for example if I'm studying chord inversions and substitutions, rather than drill through them all, I'll play along with a recording of some standard and I'll have a lead sheet for that ...


2

What does "too old" mean in the context of picking up a guitar? Are you afraid it will leave you for a younger player? Maybe it will. My violin most certainly did that a few times already. At any rate, I consider it more important having a contingency plan for being alive than having one for being dead. Because the latter case tends to have others take ...


8

I don't know what style of music you're coming from, but there are a couple of books aimed more at classical guitarists, and they would require reading music. One that I use a lot is "Pumping Nylon", by Scott Tennant. I know, the title sounds really cheesy, but some of the exercises will DESTROY your left hand. There are some really great finger independence ...


4

I would say there's never been a better time to learn guitar. There are tons of resources available online including instructional videos from YouTube. I am over 45 and have only been learning for six months. With less than an hour of practice a day (and even missing a few days), its definitely been interesting as there is always tons of stuff to learn. ...


0

Well, aside from the fact that they just like it I will admit that there are some songs which sound strikingly different in tone and mood just from a simple 1/2 step down-tuning. But ultimately, it is my belief that guitarists tune a 1/2 step down in order to make it easier for a piano/keyboardist to play along. Many times when guitarists are working with ...



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