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0

Hopefully adding to the two good answers, there's a chance you could run a passive wedge off your guitar amp, which will then be in front of you, to hear better. Or a powered monitor from the output of the amp. No, not a speaker connection! As discussed in another question some time ago, if you're having trouble hearing yourself on stage, the sound ...


1

This depends on what you're already doing. You don't "have to" do anything. Here are your options, starting with the simplest and getting more complicated. Just a cab As Laurence suggests, use your cab as your monitor - put it close to you and point it at your ears. If your guitar doesn't go to the PA speakers, this is a good option. You need to adjust ...


1

Are you using a combo amp/speaker? To hear what YOU are playing, place it not in the traditional "back line" position where it's making the sound mixer's job hard by blasting right into the audience's face (but into the back of your knees) but closer to you, aimed straight into your ears. You will immediately hear far too MUCH of your playing and turn your ...


5

They're just the "standard" numbers of those notes on a full sized 88 key piano: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piano_key_frequencies Interesting note: they run from C to C, not A to A. In other words the numbers start at C, not A. So they run as A0, B0, C1, D1... A1, B1, C2... etc. The octave number increases on the C, not the A. A slightly confusing ...


5

The letters (E,A,D etc) refer to the note. The standard tuning for the guitar is E,A,D,G,B,E (Last E is two octaves higher than the lowest one). Now, the numbers after each letter refer to the specific octave (Scientific pitch notation) of the note. As you know, there is more than one note named E. How to tell which one is which? With numbers! The number ...


3

I always understood directional picking and economy picking as the same ( could be wrong ). However, in terms of picking patterns they are identical. So if we using the example you gave the picking pattern would be DUDDUD for both Economy and directional picking. The general idea of economical/directional picking is the transition between strings is very ...


0

Get a roller trem, I only play gretsch, es335 and the likes but roller bridges are the way I've gone with every guitar and I've never had an issue.


1

You should be able to plug your guitar in into the Zoom G3 and plug the G3 into the computer. The Zoom G3 has a computer interface to plug directly into your computer through a USB cable. From the description from Zoom "G3 operates as an audio interface, letting you record directly to your computer via USB. All of your sound settings used during ...


0

He probably just does this because with his setup the pinky would be very difficult to use. If I remember correctly though he did use fat strings but they where all down tuned a half step. So there really is no reason as to not wanting to use the pinky other than it is hard. I would not teach beginners this way though. Not good to stymie your creativity in ...


1

There's nothing wrong with using your little finger however the other 3 are much stronger and (especially as SRV used strings that were really fat) he may be more comfortable like that. I remember slash saying in an interview he often used only 3 fingers on give a bluesy sound to his solos. So I guess its just about comfort and preference.


2

You mean "string" rather than "chord" I presume, and it's more or less in "fingerpicking style" that one tends to use one finger per string. In classical style however, you more often than not alternate between index and middle finger when playing several notes on one string. It's usually bad technique to use the same finger repeatedly on one string since ...


1

Learn which of the modal scale shapes contain the pentatonic shapes you know. This way you can still use the pentatonic shapes as a foundation or home base while having access to the diatonic notes if you feel like adding them.


4

Modulation is not an effect. Modulation is the process of varying one or more properties of something, in this case the sound of a guitar. Effects are achieved through modulation (variation, change) of some property of the sound (like the phase, harmonics, frequency, amplitude, etc), but modulation itself is not an effect. This is very important to note to ...


1

Modulation refers to an entire category of different effects that all have this in common: a dry audio signal is combined with another signal of the same sound that is delayed in time, slowed down or sped up. This makes use of the property that physics describes as interference or wave propagation. This creates phase cancellation and reinforcement. In most ...


1

There is no reason why if you have large fingers you cannot do a two string barre with middle or ring fingers but this is not really the easiest way of doing it. What I find works pretty well is the half positions or what some I think call the cage system. Instead of going from a normal open A chord and breaking your locked hand and then going for another ...


0

Can't speak for every combination, but found success with the following nylon string installation on a steel-string acoustic guitar. Love the sound, worth the time. Taylor 814ce Ernie Ball Earthwood Acoustic Guitar Strings (Nylon Classic Ball-End)(28, 32, 40, 30, 36, 42) There are other string brand options such as D'Addario EJ34's, Martin M160's, etc. ...


1

Those are octaves. Mute the 4th string with the index finger. This is played in a million songs in Rock and Metal now. In Jazz, Wes Montgomery was famous for this technique. Yes there should be an X on the 4th string, but with enough experience and listening you know that they are octaves.


0

You just don't sound the string in the middle. That is, you pick the two non-adjacent strings with two different fingers of the right hand, like thumb and middle. There are also picks for that kind of thing even though they don't look like they'd work well with a full (typically every finger but the pinky) fingerpicking style.


-1

I would consider this an unclear tab and look for another one, at least for verification. Typically, someone will mark in-between strings as open or with an x. Be very aware that a lot of tabs posted online are made by people that have no particular qualifications in that department, so your mileage may vary. It's hard to say exactly what they intended ...


3

I would say that's situation dependent. Sometimes you can let the note ring and don't need to silence it. When I need a more staccato note, sometimes I lift my fretting finger just enough that the string no longer sounds (finger still in contact with string, the string just comes up off the fret). There are also situations in which I'll explicitly move a ...


0

This looks indeed like the finger indication. But Guitar Pro doesn't do that automatically, so it's the author of the tab that chose these numbers, which might explain why they're strange. It doesn't seem that there is an option in the Stylesheet (F7 shortcut) to remove them. You can change their position (in the "Notation" tab - left-hand fingering), but I ...


3

The point of thicker strings for drop C tuning is that they will end up at about the same tension as the original set at concert pitch. So the neck, bridge and belly of the guitar (and the new set of strings) are only stressed the same as they were originally. Take them up to standard at your peril!!


0

One of the Guitar's greatest features in my mind is the ability to play multiple voices but still have the dynamic abilities of a string instrument. That is why it is possible to play piano music on the guitar. If you are able to do good transcription the proverbial music world is your oyster. Is there someone that composes for the guitar like this? ...


2

A large number of Isaac Albeniz pieces were originally written for piano, then transcribed (with his approval) by Tarrega for the classical guitar. These pieces are now part of the standard repertoire for guitar. My favourites are probably "Cordoba" and "Asturias(Leyenda)" - you'll find them recorded everywhere. Now I mention it, you might like to search ...


4

If they are specifically for a dropped tuning, tuning up to standard might be a risk of breaking your brand new strings. Perhaps check the packaging to see if they can be used with a standard tuning. If not, don't tune them all the way up.


3

Chord progressions are nice, and a lot of good songs have been made using them, but to move on to more complex patterns (or make your own progressions) you really need to learn the personalities of the different chords as well as some common transitions between chords. I'll try my best to explain it, but it is really hard ... especially on a forum. I'll ...


1

All the answers so far provide good advice. I would like to emphasize that - while you are building up the needed finger and hand strength to cleanly fret a 5 or 6 string barre chord, it will make it easier and less stressful on your developing muscles if you have a guitar that is optimized for easier playing. Not all guitars are created equal. But ...


1

RHavin puts it well. I would add this: check your string guage and action too (the distance of the strings from the fretboard). Heavier strings require more effort so using a light string such as .011 can help. If the action is high it will need lowered. And yes, do practice higher up the neck. Check your hand position is not too bent at the wrist. Keep ...


1

I do this a lot as I learnt electric guitar without a pick at first, then learnt to use a pick later. I end up alternating between the two a lot. I have a few methods that I use : 1) Stick pick between teeth/lips - works on but there's a yuck factor (as others have mentioned) and it takes too long to do. Need it out of the way instantly really. 2) I play ...


4

A few caveats to buying sheet music: Music for "piano/guitar/voice" often does not have the complete guitar version. If you are a guitarist, look for TABs to lend a possible greater authenticity. If the music is labeled EASY or something similar, then it is unlikely to be anywhere near authentic. Some sheet music will leave out the melody, some will not. ...


1

This depends on the arrangement. Often you will see music which has scores for piano and one singer, with chords over the score. In which case you can expect the piano part to sound fine on its own. If there are notes in place for all parts, you can probably expect there to have been more thought put in to how the parts play together and interact. Removing ...


2

It all depends on holding your hand. I'd really suggest that you let someone show you how to hold a fretted chord. If you insist on trying for yourself, try the following: move your index finger up or down until you dont have any strings in the gaps under your joints, where the pressure on the string is usually weakest. move your finger to the fret, best ...


0

It's very hard to tell without being there, seeing how your hand is positioned and hearing the sound. When I was learning, barre chords (those where you need to fret more than one string with one finger) were always the most difficult. Unless you can press firmly with the full length of your finger then some strings will sound deadened. This comes with ...


8

When you fret one string, and have your fretting finger just behind the fret it is easy to make the note ring out, as you are focusing pressure on that fingertip. When you fret a barre chord, you need to be able to put that same amount of pressure on each string, in the same position, just behind the fret, and this is just difficult at first. It requires ...


2

The progression F - Fm - C/G is a technique used in many songs. The F is the IV of C. The walk down is in the third of the F chord (A) to F Minor (Ab) then to the C Major (G), there is a G bass note over the C chord. So their is a chromatic movement of A-Ab-G in the harmony. 'Wake Me Up When September Ends' uses this over the hook in the song. It is used ...


3

The answer is in fact "C#/G#" (a C# with a G# as the bass note). That chord can be played as an A shaped barre chord on the 4th fret (446664). But playing the progression - Am, C, E, Am, G, F, Fm, C/G a semitone higher will mean having to play all barre chords instead of the open Am, E, and G and C/G. Not sure why you would want to do that. If your ...


0

It is hard to find a good drummer just like it is hard to find a good bass player who stays in pocket ( and doesn't move onto playing guitar). Maybe it is an ego thing.


0

More specifically it is n upright thumbless rasguedo. Popular in flamenco music.


8

C#. Because it's the same thing, shifted up a semi-tone.


1

That's a great question. Let me tell you what works for me. When I write a song, I usually start with a chord progression because that is easier than starting with a melody in my experience. A chord progression will provide the framework for the melody. You need to know what chords go in the key you want your song to be in. Some handy charts might ...


4

Classical (nylon strung acoustic) guitars aren't normally "sized" - they are normally all very close to the same overall dimensions. However for children or smaller players, shorter neck versions are available - 4/4 for full size, 3/4 or 1/2 or 1/4 for smaller ones. (For sizes see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_guitar) Another possibility is ...


4

Start small. Although it's possible to change chord progressions and scales in a song, it sounds to me like doing so effectively is currently beyond your skill level. So, what you will want to do is pick a scale and then harmonize the chords to it, or vice-versa. The first thing you need to do is decide what key you're in; this will determine the scale ...


2

You can probably find documentation on the web detailing the electronics layout of your guitar. You should do this and find out the impedance of your current pots. Alternatively, look in the control cavity if it is a solid body. Your new pickups should work fine with lower-valued pots. Switching to higher valued pots won't necessarily give you much in the ...


6

Anything that achieves the sound you're after is a valid technique! That said, a guitar (for example) out of tune with itself will usually sound a bit unpleasant to most ears. However ... If you listen to Led Zep's Black Dog, the guitars are played twice, panned left and right, and just a touch out of tune with each other. I don't know whether this is ...


5

It's not commonly used, but it's not unheard of. For instance, Simon and Garfunkels song Cecelia has a detuned guitar in it's percussive introduction. In the art world it's sometimes done in a more regimented way to produce microtonal music, which is more like intentionally tuning to a precise pitch between the notes you'd find on a keyboard. It can also ...


2

I'm not a guitarist, but generally when doing an arrangement, you do your melody and bass line. The you fill in with other notes from the chord. For example, if I'm filling out a measure where the melody is on E and the bass is on C, I might put another C and G in between to fill out the harmony. Now I have something like CCGE. Rule of thumb: double the ...


2

Although it would be best NOT to look at the hands while playing, in some part of the initial stages of learning and in some cases later on, this 'peeking' will occur (and maybe NEEDs to occur). However, there are many reasons NOT to look at the hands, and to train not to look: Firstly, if you ever plan to be able to read music and perform it at the same ...


-1

I've answered the following numerous times to questions like these. If you really want to take your musicianship to the next level, spend time understanding classical western harmony rather than doing "shortcuts" like saying the note of each fret out loud. Once you have a firm grasp on theory fundamentals, you won't have to "memorize" notes; rather you ...


4

I admire and respect your dedication to continued improvement. One thing I have learned after many years of playing guitar is that no matter how good you get, there is always ample room for improvement. That's a good thing because it keeps the guitar fresh and interesting. I can continue to improve until I am no longer on the north side of the grass. ...


1

Have you seen this link, by the way? (Doesn't answer your question directly but may be interesting. It also mentions pickup hum...) http://www.sustain-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/What-Are-Low-Impedance-Pickups-by-Helmuth-Lemme-SUSTAIN-Magazine-2.pdf If your Ibanez curreently has really low value Tone & Vol pots, you might need to change ...



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