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There are fonts for neck diagrams for custom chords and scales on http://www.manneschlaier.com. You can write your own diagrams on Mac OS X and iOS.


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AC/DC's drummer Phil Rudd is religious about playing behind the beat. Very simple drumming, but when you actually sit down and play it, it's hard to replicate his groove and feel. Try some songs like Cover You in Oil, Gone Shootin', Highway to Hell, Rock n' Roll aint noise pollution, etc.


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Obviously for each string which will have relatively different fret placement, you will either have to make a digital jump (such as a hammer-on), or accellerate an analog slide, which means non-uniform sliding and lots of crazy microtonal intervals occurring. That's a matter of choice. Notice though I said 'relatively' different fret placement. This is all ...


1

You don't have to learn Music Theory formally to know how it works just like you learn to speak somewhat fluently before ever going to school to learn English. Just because you learned how to speak basic English without any schooling doesn't mean that you aren't still using the alphabet. Its the same with Music Theory. Humans didn't invent scales, modes, and ...


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When a string breaks, the change in tension will not damage the guitar, but it will cause all the other strings to go slightly out of tune, so if you continue playing you may want to check the tuning. The more flexible the instrument is, and the thicker the strings, the more it will be detuned by the loss of a string. For example, an electric guitar with ...


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The Musician Training Center software (Windows and Mac OS X) at http://www.micrologus.com has a "Scale Explorer" tool that can display scales and chords notes on the fretboard like this:


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What Fergus said is true if you start a diminished arpegio from any chord tone but the root. Lets say you are playing over A7 (A C# E G) If you start a diminished chord over the 3th, C# you get C# E G A# over the 5th, E you get E G A# C# over the 7th, G you get G A# C# E All the above had the same chord tones as a rootless A7 b9 But if you start a ...


1

It seems we're having the same problem here, tapping into the well-fed musical inner ear we all have rather than being stuck in the over analytical and somewhat sterile frame of mind. My own toolbox for that : Ear training, especially on common melodies, or any melody that just won't leave, even if I have to wait a whole day before testing my solution on ...


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I'd recommend an intonation adjustment, action for comfort and checking the neck bow after a couple of weeks. The changes might be subtle at first compared to the change of feel due to the gauge upgrade, but you still want to make sure you have a reality check.


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I'd memorize the relation of the roots to the tonic for analysis and overview. However, I find it more musical, if I have to try and verbalize, to remember the relation of a note and the current (and sometimes previous and/or next) root.


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... but I have never really noticed a difference between them that I could attribute to the scale length. I have .010" on my Les Paul and if I use that gauge on my Ibanez FR 6 string, it feels like piano wire. What an unbelievable difference. In this case, I strung my 24 fret Ibanez with .009" and is now close to the Les Paul but still has more ...


1

I do that sort of thing regularly. That's why I prefer coated strings on my acoustics. They don't make as much noise when I slide. When changing between chords which don't use the same shape the easiest thing to do technically speaking is to slide on whichever strings the two shapes have in common. As Dr Mayhem suggested, the root, third and or ...


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You can only really slide when fingers remain on the same string between the chords, obviously. So a real slide can only occur between the notes of the two chords that are played with the same finger on the same string. E.g., if you want to slide from F major (1st position of d-g-b) to an Eb major (3rd position of d-g-b), the only note that you can really ...


1

Depending on exactly what chords you mean, this could be done many different ways, however my usual rule of thumb is when sliding from one chord to another is to try and slide either the root or he third or fifth (generally this means first or second finger) while moving the other fingers to the new shape during the slide. As I say, it depends on the chords ...


0

This is a pretty common problem in cheap guitars (and even some not quite so cheap ones...). The reason is insufficient electrostatic shielding, i.e. any interference from fluorescent lights and whatnot can happily bleed right into the signal wires in the guitar. The reason this disappears when you touch the strings or bridge: thereby you connect your body ...


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Do you mean feedback while muting the strings, and while the amplifier is set to high volume? If all of these are true, I think this may be microphonic feedback. In other words, some slighy loose coil windings in a pickup is vibrating at high volumn and inducing a squealing signal. Does this happen with only one pickup selected, or all of them? If ...


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I installed a small tube pre amp at the end of my pedals. I can adjust the mid levels and boost the weaker signals. I have a couple pedals that make unwanted noise. The pre amps cleans that up and being a tube type amp it give the sound a warmer feel.


1

I converted an acoustic, and even replaced nylon strings with steel to add pick-ups, and yet this (fretboard wear) doesn't appear to be an issue at all. There are two reasons for this being so: First, I filed off my frets instead of removing them, so there is still metal beneath the areas with most stress. Second, becoming accurate with fretless playing is ...


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Short answer: Doesn't matter so long as intonation is uniform between strings and you aren't looking at fret markers. Long answer: Intonation, tuning, and action go hand in hand. On top of that, nut end action will play a larger role on a fretless as you will likely have higher action there. Obviously your span decreases anyhow as you approach higher notes, ...


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STW's answer links to a Faraday cage (+1 for that!). I just wanted to explain that in a guitar context. It's a kind of wrapper in which your hum-sensitive gear (coils) go. The screening on guitar cables is effectively a faraday cage: The earth wire is a 'tube' of copper sheath around the signal wire, with an insulator between. That is: The earth wire acts ...


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If your noise changed, then either your equipment or environment changed. Your connection could be considered either, depending on it's role. It could be adding noise itself, or it could have changed the voltage your pickups are operating at and increased their sensitivity. Messing with the volume control could help identify a line voltage issue. Your ...


2

This sounds perfectly normal; humbuckers get their name because they "buck the hum", the hum being electrical interference which the coils are picking up like an antenna. A humbucker is effectively two single coils configured to cancel out the interference from each other. The exact noise you'll hear can vary quite a bit depending on the building's wiring ...


2

You are experiencing electrical interference from one or more external sources. Single-coil pickups are particularly sensitive to this. For instance, are you using the guitar in front of a computer with an old-style cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor? Are you playing in a room illuminated by flourescent tube lighting? You may need to play your guitar in a room ...


2

The short answer--leave it alone, restring it when you can, and if you happen to notice any issues then give the guitar a day or two before making adjustments so that the replaced string can reverse the effect. The reason that it's not a problem is that the tension which was held by the broken string has been transferred to the remaining strings. The ...


0

Your best bet is to take it to a luthier. They would be happy to have a look at it and quickly identify whether or not it's a good instrument, or if it will require a lot of expensive work, or if it has any irreparable structural defects (though everything in the photos looks good!). Anything that looks busted or worn out can generally be fixed, the tuners, ...


7

It is unlikely to make a bit of difference. Note there some, notably Keith Richards, who consistently play with one string removed. (OK so it's not the same string.) Don't worry. The biggest worry would be if you have a movable bridge, with greatly reduced tension on most of the strings, the bridge of such a guitar could move. Secondly if you try to twist ...


1

Instrument-making did not play a much renowned role in the USSR. So you could have instrument makers who disposed of their factory duties by working insane shifts for a week, then working on instruments for two weeks at a time privately. "Traditional" instruments like Balalaikas or Bayans might have had some degree of an official blessing: in that case, ...


4

I certainly wouldn't throw this away; if I didn't want to keep it as a curiosity piece, I would try to sell it. It may not be a great musical instrument, but it's suitable for a museum or a collector of Soviet memorabilia. I would expect to find: It is playable, but doesn't sound or feel great. Nobody would buy it for musical reasons Someone would want to ...


1

Lending an amp to someone is often a very bad idea, because you risk a lot. Guitar amps are quite sensitive, cranking them up can seriously damage them. You should bring your amp to a guitar shop to let someone check it out... However, before doing that, it might also be that your setting is messed up. Check if your gain is high enough and neutralize your ...


1

Common standard string tablature can be called 'Fret tablature' If you are going to be writing tablature for yourself, you might as well go an ergonomic step further, and use 'Fingering tablature' instead. It has two advantages - it is faster to interpret, and it informs you where your hand should be placed on the neck. Consider a piece of fret tablature ...


1

As mentioned in my comment, it would be best to ask the user who answered that other question what he exactly meant. Here I can tell you what I think he meant, and also what my take on this issue is. First of all I think that "scooping" is not at all a standard term when it comes to right-hand guitar technique. What I think is meant by it in the context of ...


2

If you are wondering on how to get a suitable/optimal fingering position, there are some existing research that develop such algorithms. For Guitar fingers position, take a look at the following paper: http://www.csc.kth.se/utbildning/kth/kurser/DD143X/dkand13/Group7Anders/final/Vladimir.Grozman.Christopher.Norman.report.pdf The algorithm is graph-based ...


1

In the answer you linked, the reference to scooping could have meant to keep your pick close to the strings as you move up and down the neck as opposed to allowing your picking hand to "scoop" (drop) below the neck. Obviously the only person who can say for sure is the person who posted said linked answer. This advice applies to playing fast picking ...


3

You are missing the tuners. I can not speak to the value of the guitar but it is not playable until at least that is replaced. It is unclear from the picture whether the tuners were friction or gear. I am betting on friction. If they were friction some slight adaption may be desired to fit modern gear tuners on the instrument. At the same time, if the ...


1

It's a hard question to answer, but I started to play guitar when I found an old spanish guitar which belonged to my father when he was young (more o less, a 20 year old guitar as well). At that time, it was not clear whether I would keep playing guitar or not, so I didn't buy another one until I decided myself to go on. If the wood is not eaten by woodworm ...


1

Particularly when using only upstrokes with tones on the same string, at least I get a more pronounced scooping motion when the pick moves towards the string. You still strike perpendicular to the string. I believe what is described is whether or not this motion is parallel to the body of the guitar. If you try striking a a chord using up- and downstrokes, ...


6

Although it seems straight forward and simple, this is actually a tricky question. The tuning you describe is simply standard tuning - except one whole step flat. Everything Bob Broadley said in his answer is theoretically correct with one minor glitch (for G to F) created by the harmonica makers. In the example you used for your guitar tuning, if you ...


0

I have the same problem in both thumbs, but you shouldn't be using pressure to grip the neck with the left thumb. It's not needed at all. Many classical players just touch the neck with the left thumb. As for the right thumb, best thing is to use something like the large Clayton rounded triangle picks. Jim Dunlop triangles also good, but they must be as ...


4

Standard tuning on the guitar is E A D G B E, from the lowest/thickest string (6) to the highest/thinnest (1). Therefore, tuning the guitar strings down to D G C F A D, from lowest to highest, will make them each exactly a whole-tone lower (the same as two semitones, or two frets, if you like). Therefore, playing the music on your detuned guitar, in the ...


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Best advice I can give you since you expressed that part of your problem already is you have short fingers and can't finger or barre chords sometimes, tells me you have a problem lots of people do. All guitars are Not built the same. Meaning, the profile of the guitar necks are all different. Some have lots of shoulder on the sides of the neck. Some necks ...


1

I second the classical guitar position. Depending on which strings have to sound, I try these approaches in this order... (not all are possible depending on the size and shape of your hands and fingers - my index is not very flat so however much pressure is applied strings under the finger grooves won't sound) Fret the barre close to the fret - Apply ...


1

I deal with the same issue, a tip I was given is to make sure to keep the wrist low and the index finger as straight as possible, also be sure you are rolling your index finger slightly so you are playing more on the fingers edge/side rather than the fleshy middle part. Also ensure you are as close to the fret as you can get.


12

Back in the 60s, unless there was an instrument that couldn't easily be re-tuned, i.e. piano, organ, etc, featuring in the set, all guitars were tuned to each other, probably using the first one that was in tune. It wasn't that important, as long as everyone was at the same pitch. Occasionally a piano was used, and the band would have to tune to whatever ...


0

Some aids for diagnosis: Before you go having the neck adjusted, check the nut. That's the bridge at the tuning peg end of the neck. If you're having string buzz when playing open strings, it could be that the neck is overly bent back (towards "behind you" if you were wearing it), as other have stated. That means there may be hump in the middle of the ...


2

One thing you can do that will help you assess the trouble, is to take a sharpie marker, and play each string one at a time. If the string buzzes in a particular fret on a spot, mark the top of the fret with the sharpie. So do this for each string at each fret position. Once you're done look at the marks and the placement of where they're at on the length of ...


1

I know this is an old thread, but I'd like to add something I think hasn't been mentioned much. In my younger days, I hated maple fingerboards purely out of looks. I just never was a fan of that bright looking fingerboard on guitars. I always have been a rock guy, blues and metal type music. So for me I always liked the looks of rosewood or ebony boards. I ...


3

Yes, in the old days all three strat pickups would have been the same, wound on a simple machine. As tastes progressed it became fairly common to buy an add on bridge pickup with more windings, for a higher level and "heavier" tone, or even a humbucker - but the neck and middle tend not to be different in construction. However there's one thing in your ...


1

Maybe get in the habit of singing along with your guitar. Or maybe I should say, play along with your voice. It seems that when you use your voice, your natural creativity comes out more directly. So if you allow your voice and your hands to track each other, maybe your inner creativity will have an easier time flowing through your guitar.


4

I would call what you want to do - playing melodies by ear. It's easier to do on piano because of the logical way the keyboard is laid out. Ascending one key is always a semitone higher, descending lower. Piano was the first instrument I learned to play and I quickly developed the ability to play any melody by ear on the piano. With guitar, it took ten ...


2

Here's my guess, since there seems to be no answer anywhere online. Martin Guitars has been around since 1833. They sell various nut widths up to 1 7/8. I am a hat maker. Virtually everyone used to wear a hat. You could get the same hat in various oval shapes to match your head shape, round, round oval, medium oval, medium long oval, long oval, extra long ...



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