New answers tagged

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Yes, see a doctor. I'm not a doctor. But: It sounds like you may have either overuse or spasming of the muscle next to the spine. Try icing it immediately after the gig and then after a day or two applying a heat pad. Also get a theracane to gently massage the entire muscle along its length. You might consider a lighter guitar, like a Steinberger: ...


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To avoid running out of fretboard it is useful to be comfortable with a number of different scales and know how to play "beyond fret 0" when doing scales focused on a barre chord position/chord shape. But then practising scales is not a popular occupation...


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I "run out of fretboard" very frequently on guitar, but not while improvising, and not at the high end. When writing, I often wish I could play lower on the guitar. I also play piano/keyboards and bass, and I like to be able to have a good low-end as a foundation in music that I write. On piano I can have it all, more or less, but even then I don't spend a ...


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Without seeing the guitar it'd be hard to tell. It would cost quite a bit to fix the issues you mentioned. I think the best thing would be to take it to an expert and see if it's worth anything. Keep in mind that it could be simply a 40$ guitar. Another thing to consider is its sound. Do you like it? If you do, you should repair it and keep it.


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The shape you're using is a bit hard to transpose, because it uses the high E open.You'd have to really stretch your fingers to transpose it and I doubt you'd achieve it. I found some other shapes that are easier to transpose: You see here that you don't use any open strings, so you can easily transpose these shapes up and down, using notes on the E ...


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Distortion means two things : distortion in the acoustic sense can be any modification of the sound ; distortion in the music sense is a specific modification of the sound. Since it's the music board, I assume that you mean the second sense. A distortion in the second sense is an augmentation of the volume associated with an hard clipping of the peaks. A ...


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6 or 7 hrs is a long gig! Check with your Musicians Union on the recommended length of playing time before breaks - and how long they can be. Another cause can be how low you sling your guitar. The higher the better for looking after backs, so if you have yours really low, as seems to be the current fashion, you'll be crouching to look at frets, and the ...


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Obviously I'd echo Shevliaskovic's advice that seeing a doctor might be appropriate as no-one here is in the best position to give advice on an individual's medical issues. Personally, things I have found help with these kind of issues are : Lighter instruments, of course, as Neil Meyer mentions Ensuring that the way you have you strap set up allows your ...


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your problem is just that your not pressing hard enough. It hurts, I know, but just keep at it and within a few weeks your fingers will adapt to the strings. The guitar is a great instrument that will accompany you for the rest of your life.Great start! Don't give up! Good luck!


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You really don't want to adjust this by yourself if you are not a technician. There is a metal rod that runs across the neck, look through the sound hole and you will find it. You can adjust this with an allen wrench to curve the neck and so lower or raise the strings. Be careful here, because if you go too far you might ruin the neck. The technician can ...


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Beyond what Dr. Mayhem suggests, there could be a minimum of how low your (electric guitar) bridge can go, and the solution there is to add a shim in the neck pocket on the bridge side. This changes the neck angle, which has a slight change at the neck but a great change at the bridge. It allowed me to get the action of my Telecaster very low. Of course, ...


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As a supplement to Tekkerue's excellent answer, there are situations where it's very useful to know multiple voicings, specifically different inversions of the same chord for creating moving basslines. Being able to change shape without changing the chord makes more of the fretboard usable for extending the range of the bassline as a separate voice.


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Having spoken to a guitarist I work with who planted a mandolin neck onto his acoustic guitar complete with bridge and soundhole, and pup, (it works really well with both!) he said that he thinks of each as a separate instrument. Guitar chord shapes belong to one set, mandolin shapes to another, and the twain never meets. So, just like learning a new guitar ...


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When a guitar is built in the factory, after they install the frets into the fretboard, they should level them before the assembly is complete and the guitar is sent to the store to be sold. But sometimes a guitar with un-level frets might sneak through quality control. If you buy a new guitar and you immediately notice that the action is uneven on ...


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When steel strings come in constant contact with softer nickel frets, eventually the steel strings take their toll. Over time, depending on how often you play, how heavy handed your fretting technique is and how much bending you do, your frets will begin to exhibit signs of wear as you have probably already discovered. Two common signs that your frets may ...


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Well- all the answers to date contain factual information. But none tell the whole story and might over complicate the matter. The least you need to know is that the chord used as the basis for your question (D/A) is known in guitar chord notation parlance as a "slash chord". In simple terms, when a slash chord is used in guitar "notation" the author ...


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If you understand intervals and chord tones, this should serve you well learning the mandolin, because you can learn a few "core" shapes and fingerings and then know how to modify then to get the full palette of chords. In this sense, your guitar knowledge shouldn't get in the way of learning mandolin. For example: learn the basic open major chords on the ...


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Directly addressing the exact chord: There are some, myself included that always play D/A when they see the D chord. Technically, a true root position D chord has D as the lowest note. Guitarists are limited somewhat in their voicings, and often play a non-root note in the bass for a chord that might not have the bass note indicated. A root position D chord ...


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First of all you have to press each finger firmly right before the frets but don't press harder than needed. On an acoustic guitar you have to press harder than on an electric guitar and if the action of the strings is high (distance to the fretboard) you also have to press harder. Clip your nails because it's almost impossible to play the guitar (i.e. on ...


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Adding to Wheat's excellent answer, the note after the slash is indeed the bass note, put there to create an inversion of the prevailing chord, but mainly to make a bass line under the song. As such, if there is only a guitar (or maybe piano) playing, it makes sense for that instrument to play the inversion of the chord indicated. However, once the bassist ...


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The notation D/A refers to a D major chord with the note A in the bass. This is an example of a major chord in second inversion. The letter after the slash indicates a specific note, not the name of a chord, so your idea of "D/Am" would make no sense. Any triadic chord can be played with the root in the bass, the third in the bass, or the fifth in the bass. ...


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I would say scales are easier and chords are just different. It's almost like learning the same chords in a different position on the neck of the guitar that you've never learned before because that "position" doesn't even exist on guitar. It's also only four courses so it's a bit simplified. For example, an open G major chord is easy on mandolin: It's 0 0 2 ...


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These are called "power chords". He's only playing three strings, so while it looks like he's playing a barre chord, the first finger is actually muting the bottom strings and not pressing down on them. Here's a good explanation of power chords and how to play them, the next video in the series shows how to move them around to play different chords. ...


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These are usually referred to as "A-shape" barre chords -- it's the same note interval arrangement as when playing an open A chord, albeit with muting the high-e string. When you use the "double bar" technique there is no easy way to get a chord tone on the 1st string so you just mute it instead. Some people fret the fourth,third and second strings with ...


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I agree with most of what's been said, but I'd like to give an answer that is specific to that first bar. The vast majority of the notes are A string 5th fret. Thus the music tenses on the notes played on the 8th fret and relaxes on the notes played on the 5th fret. Playing the notes on different strings sounds completely different (both because of the ...


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To have a more tensed sound. When low instrument (or string) plays a high note - it will sound tensed. When high instrument (or string) plays a low note - it will sound relaxed. So - if a violin and a cello will play the same note - the violin will sound more relaxed than the cello.


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The different positions of notes have a different tonality to them. Try listening to the same notes in different positions. The open string notes have a purity or clarity to them but the further you go away from the nut the more that type of effect is lost. It may be a bit hard to explain but listen closely to the same notes in different positions they all ...


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You shorten the guitar strings with your fingers. :D physics for the win! But seriously frequency always depends on length and tension.


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First of all, there is more than one way to play almost any riff, solo, or musical phrase on a guitar. Unlike a keyboard instrument, the same note in the same octave can be played in multiple places on the guitar. There are many reasons why a guitarist might choose one position to play a certain riff over another position. Sometimes it has to do with ...


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There is no correct answer as to which chord you "should" play because you can use whichever chord you think sounds best in a given situation. What you're describing is essentially changing the voicing or the way the chord sounds without changing the chord. There are many, many ways to play the same chord but each one has its own unique sound. Here are just ...


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Off the top of my head... the fret spacing is tighter there, so fingering a fast passage may be easier than in the lower position the timbre of the notes is mellower and 'bluesier', which may be the desired effect open strings can sound different to fretted notes, so it can be desirable to avoid open strings. Muting technique is also different with open ...


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While @RockinCowboy's points are all good, in reality you do need to play close to the fret - playing your finger in the middle between frets is not going to work. Your fingers should all be tight up against the back of the fret. If you ever try playing a scalloped fret guitar, you will see just how badly wrong it can go, but this holds true for all ...


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If the string is pressed down all the way to the fretboard, it should not buzz. Not just right behind the fret in question but anywhere (right after the previous fret is a bit theoretical since it's rather hard to go all the way there so it's a bit of an irrelevant point). That's the basic balance between fret height and fingerboard. If it doesn't buzz ...


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While your amp is in repair, get your house wiring checked. A working three-wire installation with a leak-current circuit breaker (which cuts the lines if the amount of current between the two live wires does not add up perfectly) will likely cut the power before you are getting fried. It's not a full guarantee against heart failure but will stop you from ...


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One point has been left out so far. The design of a guitar leaves us no option but to have equal-length strings with different thickness (with the frets used to control the length for all notes except E-A-D-G-B-E for a conventionally tuned guitar). A piano changes both length and thickness: that seems overkill until you realize that there is the issue of ...


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Ahhh the old "it's your faulty playing technique" response from the guitar tech who did the set up. I've heard that one before too - but did not fall for it. You should not have to alter otherwise proper playing technique to get your guitar to play buzz free. Sometimes positioning of certain phrases you play will necessitate placing your finger farther ...


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Adding to Todd's answer. Another problem that causes death to guitarists is a loose earth wire in the mains plug. Particularly on British type 3-pin plugs (an awful design!). Constant pulling on the flex causes the earth wire to come loose. No problem in itself, relatively. The amp still works. BUT when that earth wire flops about inside the plug, and ...


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Tim basically has answered your question but I think this deserves larger type: Your amp is trying to kill you!!! Stop using it and get it replaced or repaired This kind of problem is most common in older amps that have tube output stages. A tube output design for a guitar amp almost always requires an output transformer. The way the transformer is wired, ...


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like to hear where your at now with it. here is what my advise is find the cabinet type you like (1x10,2x10,4x10,1x12,2x12,4x12,ported open close etc.) and speaker size and tone that you like (each speaker breakup diff and tone is diff) next find the microphone you like (sm57 boosts lot of high makes it harsh and scooped, u87 is full bodied etc.) next find ...


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First to clarify some misconceptions. All strings on a guitar are actually a different length but they look the same. The bridge on the body is angled slightly so technically the strings all have a different length: The main reason why the strings can be around the same length but have different pitches has to do with the thickness of the string. On a ...


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The best-written summary I could find of this was on Wikipedia. Technical preliminaries (you can skip this if you don't care) All chordophones (musical instruments based on vibrating strings) can be analyzed using the same physics model of a string under tension that is fixed on both ends. The model is slightly simplified and differs from reality in two ...


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Both length and tension factor into the frequency of a vibrating string, along with the mass of the string. The reasons for the differences arise from how one plays the instruments, and physics. In the case of the guitar, chords are played by using the fingers to push the strings down onto the frets, decreasing the length of the string. This shows that ...


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The formula is frequency = sqrt(tension/mass per unit length)/(2*length) The factor of 2 comes from the fact that an in-tune fundamental vibration has to travel all the way down the string and back up again in order to be in phase. You can play around with all the parameters. A guitar has 6 strings of about the same tension, but differing thickness. This ...


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The pitch that a string produces is determined by the frequency of the vibration of the string. In other words how fast is it vibrating. The rate of vibration of a string when it is plucked or struck is dependant on several factors. The tension of the string is only one of the things that will affect the frequency. A string placed under higher tension ...


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All strings in the guitar (or other necked string instruments) are different: they have partially different materials (the lower strings tend to be wound with wire) and they certainly have different thickness. They sound best at a particular tension. You usually buy them in sets even though they age differently. Piano strings are very durable and rarely ...


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String diameter and scale length and tension are all factors, but you are overlooking an entirely different dimension to your question. Frets. A guitar string has a fixed length, but have you noticed the frets? When you stop a string against a fret, you are then temporarily creating a shorter speaking string length. So one string on a guitar can be stopped ...


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Both length and tension work together to create pitch. Note that the strings on a guitar are all approximately the same length and tension,but the bottom is about 4/5 times the diameter of the top string. On any string instrument, it's important that each string is about the same tension as the others, so that becomes static to a degree. So the two variables ...


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The purpose of studio monitors is to mix recorded music. While one wants extremely accurate professional studio monitors which reproduce a broad frequency range, one also has to mix music in such a way that it will sound good on the kinds of inexpensive consumer-grade speakers and headphones that consumers have in their homes and cars. This is why one does ...


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The harmonic contribution of the bass guitar is not at 27.5Hz. 27.5Hz is mainly shaking you up. Now there are organ pipes at those pitches with a strong fundamental and few overtones. But they are pretty vague musically without further context. The function of a bass guitar, most particularly an electric one, is different (which explains funk and slap ...



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