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0

When you upstrum you should only hit the highest 3 or 4 strings. Even on an open G chord, for example, I will never even come close to touching the low G or B strings, and I probably won't hit the D string either on an upstrum. If you hit all strings on an upstrum it would sound mechanical and unnatural.


1

Tab is read from left to right - just like this sentence. If two or more notes on different strings are to be played simultaneously (or several strings strummed), they will be stacked in the same vertical plane. Try to picture an imaginary vertical line moving from left to right across the lines of tab. As this line moves across the tab, it will ...


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The issue here came down to a wrong formula I got for the pentatonic scale from an internet source. The formula I used was 1,3,4,5,7 which caused all the confusion for me. @Matt L. helped me to the correct formula which is 1,2,3,5,6 and after correcting my scale, the box shapes are quite evident now. Here is my corrected pentatonic scale for A Major


1

Notes that are played at the same time are represented at the same horizontal position; another way to say this is that the note indications are "stacked" vertically with respect to one another when the notes are to be played at the same time. In your example tab, none of the notes are played simultaneously. Here's a strummed open E chord (all notes played ...


0

I was just reading one of the 19th century Method books in which the author insisted that you hold the guitar vertically, and learn to place the left hand without looking. If you do that fret markers won't do you any good. Admittedly, many (most?) modern classical performers do watch their left hand fingerings closely. A compromise is small fret markers ...


2

With a classical guitar with no fret markings, the join of the shoulders with the neck will be precisely at the 12th fret. So you can identify the 5th fret as 1 hand-width past the nut and the 7th fret as 1 hand-with from the 12th-fret join. Practice not even looking at the fret-board while you play. Instead, look at the music, the conductor, the other ...


5

If you can learn to play without fret markers, you will have a tremendous advantage over those who have learned to rely on the fret markers. When I first began learning to play guitar I relied on the fret markers to help me find my place on the fretboard. But when I started playing for audiences on dark stages, I recognized the limitations of not being ...


2

A more practical approach If you are searching for a temporary solution to, let's say use the backing tracks for improvising over them without being disturbed by vocals or mid-range buzz, there's some little tricks you can do with audio material in a simple sound-editor without the need of sophisticated and expensive tools. Of course, because of the ...


3

Removing vocals or other tracks from an already mixed and mastered file is very complex and depends on a lot of factors. There's no one size fits all answer because tracks can be mixed in all sorts of ways with many different effects. In the case of Karaoke or Guitar hero, they typically get access to the master tracks and in the case of Karaoke mix it ...


1

Using your thumb isn't "bad technique" per se. It's either appropriate or it isn't, given the context in which you do it. For example, if this chord is sandwiched between two others which require the first finger barre, maybe it would be better to leave the finger down through those chords. Bad technique is what I did when I started playing years ago, saw ...


2

They are both just ties to indicate that you sustain the note for 4+2+1.5 beats (or an eight note less than two bars). The dashed one is dashed because it applies to the harmonic notes. Note that you hold the F on the 6th string against the fretboard, but induce a harmonic at the 7th fret. The wavy vertical line indicates that the "chord" should be ...


1

As you already do have a minor chord on the V (C#m) you could, at the end of your verse, turn it into a C#m7 and add a little ii7 - V7 - Imaj7 progression to give your chorus some new kick to shine. -> C#m7 F#7 Bmaj7 and use the chords of your new tonic B (or even Bm)... or add a little bridge between verse and chorus that executes that ...


2

Matt's answered the first part, here's the second. In the key of F#m, relative to A maj., the easily usable chords are : A, Bm, C#m, D, E, F#m, G#o. Another set is available to add interest : the parallel minor set of Am, Bo, C, Dm, Em, F, G. Using sus chords will give another dimension, by taking away the 'gender' of the chord - maj/min. But don't use one ...


3

The Bm chord has the note D as its third, so you aren't in the key of C# minor, but in the key of F# minor. So your progression is actually: || F#sus2 | C#m | Bm | Esus2 || The reason why the C# minor pentatonic scale works is because it is (also) a subset of the F# (natural) minor scale, which is the basic scale fitting all 4 chords of your progression.


0

Some of the tricks used in country music where the guitar was for show more than anything else, the would wrap their thumb around the three base strings and the index fingers around the 123 in same fret to form a chord. Then moving it up and down the neck the singer could play along with the band. Some of those country singers playing was worse than their ...


1

Who has the power to decide? Any technique that works for an individual cannot be a bad one. Yes, purists may disagree, but it's not them playing, it's you! As stated already, an extra digit is always an asset, particularly on extended guitar chords. I'm only jealous, having small hands...


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Not at all, it's a great technique! There are chords that you can only play by using your thumb, e.g. the following voicing of A13(b9) (from low E to high e): 5 X 5 6 7 6 where you play the E string with your thumb. If you used your first finger to play a barre chord it would be very difficult to mute the A string.


1

I wouldn't say this is a bad technique. There are many guitarists that use this one, for the very same reason you mentioned. You have one extra finger, thus you can play one more note. Also, when I play a chord like this, it is more relaxing for my hand.


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ADGCEA is a common tuning for mini guitars. The 3 higher strings are tuned like a ukulele. My Yamaha GL1 guitalele is 17" bridge to nut. So the high A string is tuned to 440. So apart from the 5 semitone difference, it plays just like a guitar. I haven't bought new strings yet, but most likely I'll get the set Cordoba sells for their guilele (Aquila ...


1

First of all, this will only happen when ascending a scale, i.e. when moving to a higher (thinner) string. The reasons for the open string(s) to ring out have been discussed in Tim's answer. In my opinion the best solution to the problem is to mute the string with your left hand index finger. So when the first note on the new string is played with fingers ...


3

There are three parts to playing a note. One - press down string onto fret. Two - release pressure and three - take finger off string. Do this really slowly, and you will hear when the problem occurs. It will usually be the last part. Your fingertip will be making the open string vibrate, in one of two ways. Either because it is stuck slightly to the string, ...


1

Plenty of good answers here, but here's something I haven't seen mentioned - novelty is inspiring. If I play the same guitar for too long I start getting in a creative rut. Everything sounds the same, and I get bored and frustrated with myself. This happens to everyone I think, and common advice is to play a completely different instrument, or do a ...


2

The pickups in the classic Gibson Firebird are known as "mini-humbuckers". You can buy adapters to replace the full-size humbucker mounting rings used by many guitars, including most SGs, that will allow a mini-humbucker to be used instead. As this just screws to the top of the guitar in place of the previous ring, it's a reversible operation that won't ...


2

The question has been answered quite thoroughly. But since the question quoted me directly (from my answer to the overnight detune question), I feel compelled to weigh in. Part of the reason I have ten acoustic guitars is purely nostalgic. My first acoustic was a present from my wife from before we were married so it has sentimental value. My next ...


1

Guitar players are just notorious about owning many guitars. Also: a player might have two or more copies of the same guitar on stage in case of string breaks. Even at the level where you can afford a guitar tech to change strings for you, your show would be halted for minutes otherwise. (I saw an acoustic Todd Rundgren show a few years back and he had ...


1

The short answer (gleaned from everyone's helpful contributions): Guitars come in a wider variety, anatomically, and can produce a wider variety of effects, than cellos Guitars are cheaper than cellos and pianos Guitars take up less space than pianos


1

I have had the same type of problem with all of my Les Pauls which have the same type of tune-o-matic bridge and stop tail piece. I recommend that you try the previous answer and turn the saddle in question around and see if that gives you the extra room you need. If that doesn't give that extra room purchase a bridge that is wider and that will give you ...


1

All relative scales work the same no matter the scale. For example in the case of major and minor pentatonic scales in your example the C major pentatonic scales and the A minor pentatonic scales contain the sames notes as you can see here: C Major pentatonic: C D E G A A Minor pentatonic: A C D E G The differences is what the tonic (or root) ...


0

Your friend has heard something about old-fashioned longbows which must be unstrung after use. A yew bow will deform if it is left for a long time under full tension. Thus it becomes less useful as a bow. When it comes to guitars, they are designed to be under tension. In fact (depending on the type of instrument) the neck may form a reverse curve when the ...


5

differing tonal qualities, with electric , also acoustic. different tunings, to save bothering retuning one. different actions, e.g. high for slide playing. with/without vibrato. different styles for different genres. different strings, maybe light to bend, heavy for other reasons. different no. of strings - 6/7. investment - would you gig with a ...


0

There's really no need for that. For intonation fine tuning, the little screw can be adjusted while the string is under tension, otherwise, the string will need re-tuning each time. As far as action goes, again, there's no need. In fact, it gets in the way to de-tension. A Tune-o-matic bridge has two screws, which will turn while the guitar is in tune. A ...


1

With a Fender style bridge you just need to loosen one string a little and adjust height and intonation, then retension. To adjust intonation on a one piece (Les Paul style?) bridge you need to loosen a string quite a lot more to allow access to its intonation adjustment at the rear of the bridge. For height adjustment on a one piece bridge you'll need to ...


1

Why do you want to take the strings off to do that? Slacken the one specific string you are working on slightly if you are raising the action or adjusting the intonation rearwards; keep compensating for pitch as you adjust. Otherwise it's just repetetive guesswork as to what it will be like once you reassemble it.


4

Check this video out for guitar collecting taken to the extreme. To add to what Andy has said sometimes there is a matter of a having more than one guitar serves some practical purpose but often it is just simply because you can. When you come to a point where you have spent most of your life playing a guitar and now have ...


11

Guitar (just acoustic guitar for now) is one of those instruments where different constructions, setups and playing characteristics (slide guitar and so on) means having several guitars can be useful. Going a little off topic, electric guitar is even worse - different pickup models, "tremolo" (i.e. vibrato) devices, neck and body constructions, extended ...


0

Have you changed strings in those 3-4 months? If not, the simple answer is that your strings are dead. Average working life for guitar strings is maybe 2 months if you're not playing hard. The most common reason for strings to break is that they're old and fatigued. Don't ever, ever, ever, change a single string in isolation and leave all the old crappy ...


0

You say "sounds fine". Do you have a digital tuner? If not, download a guitar tuner app on your phone. If you're relatively new to the guitar, my first bet would be that you don't have good enough ears yet to tune by ear. Keep working on it, you'll get there - but in the meantime, a digital tuner will see you right. My next bet would be that you haven't ...


1

Look around for a guitar that fits your fingers better. Neck width and length varies among manufacturers and even among models for a single manufacturer. If you have the ability to visit multiple stores trying stuff out, you should be able to find one that works for you. Or, if you have plenty of cash, find a builder and have one made to your own specs! ...


5

The short answer is - DO NOT give up on playing guitar just because your fingers aren't optimally configured. You can adapt and learn to play quite well - if you really want to! Unfortunately not all of us who aspire to learn to play guitar are blessed with long slender fingers. But if you have a strong desire to play, you can overcome whatever ...


3

Could be a few things to look at, with the best/most likely at the top Finger and hand positions, experiment with different techniques until you find a perfect hand position/shape for EVERY chord you are getting bum notes with that reduces the chances of a bad sound, trying alternate places and or missing out notes to get a chord that sounds best Have ...


6

Most players probably don't play full chords above 12th fret; however, you could try using fewer fingers, as in for an E shaped chord, using one finger on 5th and 4th strings, similarly on A shaped chords, play with 2 or 3 fingers - a barre over all 6, and a mini barre over 4,3 and 2. Just playing 3 or 4 notes out of particular chords works well, too, as ...


5

Leave it tuned, not only will the strings thank you for allowing them to 'settle in' to their proper tension (think of repeatedly bending a coat-hanger to break it) but the machine head gears will also not suffer as much slippage in the long run. The wood and glue is also better off staying under tension. The only time where all the strings should be ...


1

Most folks can sing, after a fashion, but if you feel you can't, don't worry. Use your internal voice. You can listen to phrases, then try to copy them. Record your own - then you know what key they're in - and play them back to copy. As you do, you'll probably mentally map out what they will play like. This is more important. Chances are that with higher ...


0

Your problem MAY be that you start on one note - call it a 'root', and the interval to the next note isn't that difficult to recognise. When you then move to a different 'root', the sound is blurred by the interval that's produced by the second/third notes. Try keeping the same 'root', and listen to different intervals just from that note. Then choose a ...


15

Imagine what chaos there would be in a guitar shop close to closing time every day! And even worse at opening time! Just smile sweetly at your friend, and let him carry on wrecking his guitar and wasting his time, but realise that actually you know far better and leave your guitar in tune for the next day. I've done it with about 20+ guitars for 50+ years, ...


1

Yes you can. Actually periodically (day by day) tune and detune the guitar hundred times a year and thousand times by its lifecycle may harm your neck way with much greater possibility than leaving it alone. Tuning and detuning is always a kind of stress for the neck you do not want to do this unnecessary thousand times.


22

I leave all ten of my acoustic guitars tuned all the time. In most cases it is not a problem to leave your guitar under the full tension of standard tuning for days or even weeks at a time. However, if you know you will be storing a guitar for an extended period of time (months) without playing it or changing the strings, it is probably a good idea to ...


3

Yes you can leave your guitar tuned over night and it is what most if not all guitarist do. The neck of your guitar should be able to take being in tune for a period of time and the tension put on it and if not, there are more serious issues with your guitar.


0

Every interval has a specific sound - but everyone of us may perceive that differently. But you can build some personalized mnemonic aid especially for you. Custom as it were ;-) I'll tell you some of mine just to give you an idea of how this could work for you. I'll start off with the b7th: Leonard Bernstein - my hero, as conductor and composer -> ...


0

I'm a keyboard player not a guitarist, but the same issue of finger independence is relevant. I'm not sure your statement is an accurate description of cause, at least for a normal hand anatomy. AFAIK the limitation is the arrangement of the tendons in the hand, not the nerves. For what it's worth, if my hand is in a relaxed position with all the finger ...



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