New answers tagged

0

Here are the voicings I typically use for an F chord: %X/X.0/0.3/3.3/3.2/2.1/1[F] %1/1.x/x.3/3.3/3.2/2.0/0[Fmaj7] %T/1.x/x.3/3.3/3.2/2.1/1[F] I agree that barring the F so close to the nut is difficult and usually unnecessary. I'm sorry if this doesn't display properly. AFAIC, jTab is broken.


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I believe an F chord is difficult due to the length of the neck and the angle that is required of your wrist. Notice how much easier each chord is to make as you go up the neck. And even with light gauge strings it is easier but still hard. Try bending strings for an open E pentatonic pattern.


1

I basically never play barre chords this way (full barre with the first finger) ...for the same reason you found - it is difficult to barre across all six strings without buzzing, especially if you don't use light strings, low action etc. If you think about it mechanically, it is quite inefficient to need all this strength in the first finger, when it's ...


1

Do check your guitar's action (or get it checked). If your strings are too high, that won't help. Technique is a big deal. Rolling the barre finger to be barring with the more-bony outside of the finger is essential. Make sure your elbow is closer to your body, which rolls your wrist into the right position to put your finger in the right position and ...


2

Try this: index does a barre on the first two strings middle finger on third string little pinky finger on 4th string ring finger on 5th string thumb on 6th string Of course it requires a bit practice, but as does any other method I guess. But once you get it, you realize that this position seems very natural


2

When I was struggling to play barre chords, I found that what helped me a lot was - every so slightly - just rolling my index finger backwards (that is, towards the head of the guitar.) This way, instead of the fleshy underside of my finger contacting the guitar, and muting the strings slightly, also leading to buzzing in many cases, I could use the harder, ...


1

If I would have a guess I would say that it is a poor score and what the piece really wants is a return to the original tempo. It would be better to indicate that with the terms tempo primo or a tempo. It is confusing as you rightly point out. Moderato is a indication of character not mere speed or tempo. As with such things the character is indicated at ...


3

I would certainly read it as: Start accelerating at the accelerando so that you are playing at a moderato tempo when you get to the moderato, then continue to play moderato until you reach another tempo marking or the end of the piece. That might not be exactly how others play it, and every performance involves interpretation of the score by the ...


3

Try experimenting with different points of contact. For instance, pressing down with the index finger flat against the string like this will likely result in a few dead strings since you are using the fleshy part of the finger. Instead, try rotating the index finger slightly so it is more the side of the finger that is in contact with the strings: Note ...


11

Just about every guitarist struggled at some point with barre F. I only ever had one student who simply played it perfectly from the beginning. Despite what some people say, callouses won't help, and squeezing the life out of the neck won't either.Sounds to me like the guitar action is in need of some fettling. If you can put the capo on about fret 4 and ...


2

Lowering the guitar a tone and adding a capo is how I play my guitar now most of the time. Partly to make chords like F more accessible and partly to play with looser strings. You are right in your thinking about the capo making the action lower, and making chords easier to reach and play. I could suggest playing the F chord slighly differently by trying ...


4

You'll get the F chord with the bar chords, it just takes time. When I first started learning, I started off with open chords (non-bar), gradually introduced the F chord and then went on to bar chords.. Anyway, it's more of a leverage thing, rather than a "guitar problem" imo. What you do with your thumb/finger placement and wrist angle has a lot to do with ...


1

I'm gonna resurrect this thread to say that the way I do it is pulling the mp3 into a DAW like ableton or fl and put a spectrum analyzer plugin on the track. Then you can see what notes are in the chord and what octave they're in so you can exactly know what position to play the chord in. This is only useful if you have the file and is definitely not going ...


0

When to change your Guitar Strings? When the strings sound dull and lifeless; they may even look dull. When the strings no longer play in tune, exhibiting evidence that they've lost their flexibility. Note: As through repeated contact with hands and fingers, guitar strings lose their tone and won't play in tune; they also wear out and eventually may ...


1

The scientific objective side of the answer has been thoroughly explored, so I'll keep my answer on the touchy-feely subjective side 😊 We've established a thicker plectrum (yes, it's actually the right term) is proportionally more rigid and tranfers energy more efficiently. It also has more mass, and depending on your picking speed (160 bpm sextuplets, ...


6

Thicker picks (tend to) remain in contact with the string longer. The impulse provided to the string is of longer duration. A longer duration pulse imparts more lower frequency and less higher frequency content. Imagine the thick pick, at an angle, coming in to hit the string. It strikes the string, which starts to move along with the pick, but the pick ...


0

I found this in my own research: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/TE-901-SingingAndPlaying.php There's more on the site itself but lessons is based on these ten steps: Listen to the song a lot. Like a LOT, at least 10 times in a row, and focus, try and get inside the track, not just scratch the surface. Try to ABSORB it. ...


2

Well since there is no "trick" to correcting wrong technique from one day to another (especially if you have been doing it for 5 years) I'd say this is going to be a matter of a lot of practice and concentration. Every time you pick up the guitar and play you should actively focus on how you are holding it and only play with the correct technique from now ...


-2

I've been playing guitar for 5 years (I'm 14) and I have found that because I had my thumb draped over the top of the neck that I have Tennis Elbow and am at a risk of my muscles detaching from my arm. So I asked ALOT of imformed people and they all told me that you have to hold you thumb at the middle of or beneath the middle of the guitar neck.or this will ...


4

I can totally understand your question. I experienced the same thing when first learning to play guitar to accompany my singing. I have met some folks who play the guitar very well but cannot combine singing and guitar playing and do both at the same time. Even professional musicians and famous performers often choose to leave the playing up to their ...


1

It may sound a tad abstract, but it helped for me: Try to not focus on what you're playing on the guitar and on what you're singing, but try to listen to the piece of music that you're playing as a whole. The vocals and guitar are just two components of a musical piece and in a song they come together. A perfect example for this convergence is an ...


3

You should really base your choice of what to learn based on which one you most like rather than which one is easiest. In truth, no instrument is easier than any other when played at the highest level of musicianship, just some instruments are easier to get started on than others. Violin and guitar are fully chromatic instruments meaning that every note is ...


5

All of the below assumes whatever you do will involve daily practice (at least half an hour but an hour is better) and study (of resources on how to play). You don't need a teacher to learn harmonica but if guitar is your first instrument then a teacher is highly recommended, and for violin almost everyone needs a good teacher to succeed. A diatonic ...


1

Thanks much to @Andy for his answer. I thought I'd add my specific experience here for posterity. The thumb pot doesn't have a casing so I wired the shield wire to the "anti-clockwise tab" on the pot and wrapped it around one of the mounting screws before joining it to the negative wire. I tried not joining the negative to the shield at the pot and this ...


0

The only time I would not tune up from below is if the string had been tuned way too high already for whatever reason. In that case, after you tune the string down, it will tend to creep up a bit afterwards because of material memory. Tuning it from above will help counteract this effect. That said, this is only really applicable to certain materials- ...


0

The only way I can think that you'd damage it would be if you thought you needed heavier strings in order to play rhythm (you don't!). The wrong gauge of strings can bend the neck forwards, which would make the guitar harder to play - but even then, a good guitar technician can get it straight again, or changing back to the recommended string gauge would let ...


0

The gist of these answers is correct: try notes from the related key/scale or from notes in and around the chords; practice singing then playing notes into your tuner to make sure you're playing the notes you think you are. Another thing to think about is that melodies played on guitar just don't sound the same as when sung. I'm not sure if it's because ...


1

You cannot damage it with strumming (well, over time you can start to wear down the paintwork. A lot of time) Guitars are not designed to be rhythm or lead, they are just stringed instruments which can be played with fingertips, nails, or a pick (or a bow, an electric drill, etc) I have a nice 7-string RG, and while I play lead, some of our songs require ...


6

I'm hesitant to add an answer, but I don't have enough rep to just comment. In any event, no, that doesn't seem "normal". :) Couldn't tell from the video because your fret hand was out if the frame for most for the video - but are your hands coming off (completely) of the strings when you switch chords? If so I'm wondering if there's a grounding problem... ...


7

Some people's calluses seem to be semi-permanent, but others will quickly lose them after a period without playing. There is some related discussion here. However, your concern about tone on the piano is unfounded. Piano keys are not so sensitive that the toughness of your skin is a factor; you have to depress them far more than your finger pads would ...


4

You can make these a number of ways: simplest: buy from any one of the hundreds of shops online that sell them (even though Allparts sells them by the 100, that's still around $10) speak to a local luthier and ask if you can buy some from them cut them from any flat white plastic (or any colour) - a hole punch of the right diameter is useful here paint ...


12

Basically, yes - callouses are your body's protection against damage (that it could incur from pressing hard on the strings, which cut into your flesh) As you become more proficient, you will learn how to press only as hard as is needed, and no more - this will help a lot, but you will still have harder pads on your fingertips. Nylon strung guitars ...


1

If you're really keen on not developing callouses at all, I think the best way would be to soak your fingers in water (maybe with Epsom salts? or just moisturizing soap?) after practicing to let the skin really soften and re-hydrate. Let 'em get prune-y. Then dry thoroughly, let them un-prune, and apply whatever lotion or handcream you usually use. ...


0

I am already playing for years and I do not really have this problem. As you are playing a classical guitar, the nylon strings will normally be very soft to your fingers. Electric guitar strings are a bit 'harder', but in the end they are a whole lot 'smoother' than for example typical folk strings. So I won't worry too much in your case. However, do not ...


1

Suggestion 1: You could also just play the same note on a different string and fret to avoid this problem? E.g. play the bend as you were playing it, but play the following note on the same (B) string by sliding back to the 6th fret. This would of course be a solution which is impossible if you would play the same riff on the 3rd fret for example. ...


4

Distortion and overdrive is done by clipping the signal. So there really isn't a way to recreate this exact sound without some kind of electronic device altering the sound. This article shows some simple wave forms and what distortion looks like. http://www.howtogeek.com/64096/htg-explains-how-do-guitar-distortion-and-overdrive-work/ Resonator guitars ...


1

A good example of the G/B chord which illustrates why it matters which note is in the bass is the main progression/riff from "Blue on Black" by Kenny Wayne Shepherd. The riff starts on a D chord with the bass note moving briefly down to C and then back to D. The next chord is introduced by a "walk" up the A string, playing the notes A, B, C to finally form ...


0

For me it was all about the tone. The over drive, distortion had more or less clarity depending on the amps used in conjunction with certain pedals. Each set-up is determined by the guitarist ear, what he/she prefers. I, coming from 90s metal in SD and LA would use a TS9 tubescreamer (the older models) to add a certain tone to the crunch as it were, shaping ...


0

While there is no 100% answer here, the common advice I see is to use an overdrive to compress and boost the signal so that the pre-amp stage of the amp can more effectively distort the signal. In this configuration you would dial the Drive setting of a TubeScreamer (for example) to near zero, Tone at whatever you want, and the Level to a very high setting. ...


3

Normally all of the following are earthed (soldered to the casing of the volume pot) The outer ring of the jack socket (that's your main earth to the amplifier) The strings (via a wire to the tailpiece or bridge) - this usually reduces interference picked up by the strings The anti-clockwise tab of the volume pot (this little wire is essential for the ...


6

Overdrive pedals like the tube screamer have a boost to the mid frequencies. When you turn up the output of the O/D pedal in the amp, the middle frequencies get more distorted, while the bass and highs are left more clean. This keeps the bass sound tight, which is essential for fast metal rhythms, and helps the guitars be heard over the low end of double ...


7

There are actually as many "metal" tones as there are metal guitarists. Some of the best metal guitarists in the world use no effects, but simply crank up their Marshall. Others will run a fuzz into a metal distortion then a high gain pre-amp stage, and boosted into distortion within the power amp stage. Still others will run parallel signal paths through ...


2

Distortion comes from the circuit 'clipping' the signal, changing the shape of the waveform and adding extra harmonic content to the signal. It's often preferred to go through multiple stages of gentler clipping, so that each stage 'rounds off' the signal a little more, as this allows the player to control the amount of distortion in a more graduated and ...


0

It is my understanding that some instruments require much more skill in distinguishing notes from one another than others (at least if you want to play well). In music class in elementary school, before selecting band instruments, the teacher gave us each a test, playing two notes on the piano (with her hands hidden from me) and asking which was higher ...


1

I'm certainly not an authority but I can at least detail what I've learned so far. Although I bet it is possible for the pickup to be at fault, in my case I'm pretty sure by now that this was a wiring/grounding problem. Replacing the wire with the 18 gauge shielded wire made a big different right off the bat. Before I was using a single-core 22 gauge ...


0

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1

I can understand and relate to your frustration. My mother was an accomplished pianist and taught piano. But when she tried guitar, she gave up quickly. She kept the guitar and so growing up I had access to both instruments. I became enamoured with guitar after starting on piano so I have experience learning both. The good news is that if you really ...


1

Barring physical disability, anyone CAN play any instrument. The easier Bach Inventions are regularly set for Grade 5 examinations, so in 6/7 years, regularly prodded by a teacher but not practicing much, you made rather less than average progress. This indicates a degree of talent, I suppose! Are you taking guitar lessons, or trying to teach yourself?


2

While most answers bring valuable assessments, I would also add the fact that you need to accomodate with the instrument you want to play. Piano players think their instrument differently than guitarist do, same for drums players. So, added to the fact that you must build up your skill, supposedly try to get a teacher or understanding how instrument works, ...


0

I find the strings ALWAYS higher, never lower, dilatation due to variation of humidity should work both ways, not always higher. The only guess I can make is that when I augment the tension of the string, because of friction on the bridge, some tension remain accumulated in the part of the string between the tuning peg and the bridge, and then that tension ...



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