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I play the recorder and find it far worse if I eat anything. I have to stick to just water - even the acid in wine causes me problems, which is bad if you need a bit of Dutch courage to play to an audience..... I'm going to drown or choke one day........Avoid biscuits and chocolate like the plague - they look vile dripping out of the bottom of the ...


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The answers above so far cover songs in major scales. A major scale also has a relative minor. However there are some 20-30 popular scales, and far far more than that possible. In fact there are 332,640 possible scales of 7 semitones per key. [see calculation below] At very best a 'correct' harmonica is going to give you a couple harmonious chords and one 7 ...


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Technically Fergus's answer which got no votes at all till my arrival was the most correct answer to the particular question asked; Lower notes have longer or heavier reeds, and thus more momentum to overcome for bending. That is only half the answer however. Bending is not about volume of air, over-blowing, or adjacent reeds as was mistakenly imagined for ...


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If the harmonica had a plastic comb, you could simply soak the whole thing in lemon juice overnight. Old harmonicas which have pins or rivets typically have pear-wood combs however, and soaking them is not advisable. Rivets and pins are essentially the same thing. Rivets are hollow-tube pins. A two-part hollow tube would definitely be called a rivet, but ...


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You can't avoid playing with the tongue, especially if you need to split notes. It's also goofy to spend the whole time looking up. Do not attempt blowing out to clear spit; That just makes it worse. Here's what to do: If you must do some intense extended blowing, those are times you need to be looking up. Otherwise, as part of your routine, be aware of ...


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Standard diatonics (aka Richter or blues harmonica) typically have only 10-16 holes across. A blues harmonica is primarily laid out to repeatedly create a single major chord on the blow notes, I-III-V-VIII, do mi so do, however the upper octave is arranged to provide an entire major scale when combining blow and draw notes by including alternative draw ...


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Additionally to what Cornelius said (I can't simply add comments here yet), what you have here is neither a typical chromatic or diatonic (blues) harmonica. Standard diatonics typically have only 10-16 holes across. A blues harmonica is mostly laid out to repeatedly create a single major chord on the blow notes, I-III-V-VIII, do mi so do, however the upper ...


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A tremolo harmonica merely doubles the holes and reeds for each note. Typically they simply double the identical note for a wavering sound quality, although sometimes the additional holes might be up an octave, fifth, or even a third interval instead. It is meant to be played using the two holes instead of one. Aside from that, what you have is probably a ...


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Although it seems straight forward and simple, this is actually a tricky question. The tuning you describe is simply standard tuning - except one whole step flat. Everything Bob Broadley said in his answer is theoretically correct with one minor glitch (for G to F) created by the harmonica makers. In the example you used for your guitar tuning, if you ...



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