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17

It is not true in general that the higher you go on the fret board, the lower your harmonic is. Actually, if your were to play an harmonic at the 24th fret, you would hear a note sounding an octave higher than the harmonic at the 12th. Still, however, the harmonics behave differently than fretted notes. Now, let’s get physical and explain why. On perfect ...


12

You might be actually playing A 110, two octaves below A 440. The open A string on a standard tuned guitar is actually two octaves below the A that is normally tuned to 440. To play the A that should be at 440 Hz, you have to play the 5th fret on the high E string, or the 10th on the B string, or the 14th on the G string, etc. Why? The 440 A is the A above ...


3

Although I definitely see what you're saying, it's not strictly true that harmonics closer to the nut will be higher. What's happening with natural harmonics is you are dividing the string into to equal parts. An open string will not only vibrate at its fundamental frequency but also at integer multiples of that frequency, each getting higher and quieter. ...


2

After all the technical answers, try this. Play , say, the 7th fret harmonic, then press down on the EIGHTH fret. Pluck the string BEHIND - as in closer to the nut. You'll find that the note is the same. If there were more, smaller fretwires, you could do this for all the harmonics. You have been fooled into thinking the harmonic nodes only work going DOWN ...


2

My friend, you have just stumbled onto the Harmonic Series. This was something Pythagoras tinkered around with using the monochord, and is primarily responsible for much of how Western music sounds, is written, is analyzed, and is perceived. Very basically, all sound travels through vibration. Since vibrations are made up of waves, each wave has a crest, ...


1

You can strike a natural harmonic, like a nice G at the octave fret across the D,G,B strings, then play fret 2 on D and 1 on B string to turn it into a C afterwards. If you fret them quickly & decisively, the harmonic of the G still rings and it sounds like harmonics in C - but a chord. I do this sometimes and if I get it right, it can sound really ...


1

If you play the C or F harmonics with your fingernail on the side of the string instead of your fingertip on top of the string, you can bend them into tune (or bend many other harmonics). There is also a C just above the 11th fret of the E strings and an F on the 11th fret of the A string. They're pretty fuzzy sounding and take a lot of pressure. They ...



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