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5

The "warble" is a beat frequency. Any two notes that are only a half step apart will produce a similar beat frequency. This particular one might be more noticeable on your guitar because of intonation and/or differences in timbre that highlight that particular beat frequency. Actually any two notes played at the same time produce some sort of beat ...


4

The point of consonant intervals (of which chords are mostly comprised) is that the various frequencies are in a ratio of small numbers. Now if the intervals are perfect intervals, the result is a combined signal that has the frequency of the greatest common divisor of all contained frequencies, reminiscent (after frequency separation in the inner ear) of a ...


4

You could have a look at Csound, Pure Data, SuperCollider, or ChucK to name but a few. These are audio programming environments with full flexibility to do whatever you could think of, including additive synthesis, but be prepared for an intense learning period.


4

The presumption is that a pitched sound consists of partials that have frequencies that are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency, so that a note with fundamental frequency f (e.g. 100Hz) has partials at f, 2f, 3f (100, 200, 300 Hz) and so on - or in terms of ratios, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and so on. It's these ratios that the deviation is from in an ...


3

Just intonation does produce harmonic sounds; perhaps the most harmonic sounds possible. You are correct that for a Justly tuned system to work, then each of the tones that you use will need to be adjusted relative to the current tonic. Because of this, you are correct to think that there will need to be many different 'flavors' of each note, depending on ...


2

The article or book you are asking about is talking about pianos because of the stiffness of the strings and how that makes the piano behave different from how idealized physics says it should behave. The partials of notes created by most musical instruments have integer ratios to the fundamental frequency of the note. For instance, the third partial of a ...


2

The fun thing about working in the frequency domain is that the maths are really simple. For example, the effect of an equalizer is completely independent of the signal you're feeding it, it's just a simple multiplication of the signal (in frequency domain) with the equalizer frequency response. What I'm getting at is that any visual equalizer already ...


2

The name for the sounds you are describing are indeed called Subharmonics. They were discovered by violinist Mari Kimura in the early 1990's and first presented in 1994. As her website states, I first discovered the technique from an age-old bowing exercise, a modified version of "Son Filé", drawing the bow very slowly but applying slightly more ...


2

When a person hears a combination of sounds which are at many precise or nearly-precise multiples of a common frequency, and are not common multiples of a higher frequency, the person will often perceive a at that common frequency, whose timbre will be influenced by the combination of frequencies above it. This effect can be experienced even if the ...


1

When presented with a (relatively) complex pitched sound, beyond just frequency extraction, your brain does additional processing to identify harmonic patterns, i.e. sets of frequencies where all of them are integer multiples of some fundamental frequency. This is an important part of our pitch perception. Because of this complex processing there is not ...


1

I think the basic of harmonization will do you good. I think the better way of approaching harmony especially when it is for four voices is to think of it as two melody written together with the middle voices giving substance to the thing. So lets consider the following. Your melody voices need a good width. Aim for an octave. Your melodies need to be ...


1

The harmonic nodes are uniformly distributed across the length of the string. at the 12th fret (2x open string frequency) at the 7th and 17th fret (3x open string frequency) at at the (approx) 5th and 24th fret (4x) at the (approx) 4th, 9th, 16th and 28th (5x) and so on for some of nodes closer to the bridge, like the "28th fret" you have to imagine ...


1

Researchers in psychoacoustics and music psychology have been studying this for a long time. I believe it's Plomp and Levitt showed that, with intervals, if you take just the fundamental, interval dissonance simply decreases with interval size (m2, M2, m3, M3...M7...) but if the overtone of each note are added in, you eventually get the well-established ...


1

If you only think about the fixed frequency instruments, just intonation is not good for the instrument construction, there is good examples for the guitar above. There will be technical difficulties with a piano and other instruments too. But for continuous variation pitch instruments, the just intonation will have more natural sounding. There is a good ...


1

I can strongly recommend reading Harry Partch's Genesis of a Music, in which he goes into depth on the history of tunings and the reasons for them. Out of this he derives his 43-tone-to-the-octave scale, and then talks about the instruments he had to build and adapt to play music in this scale, and the compositions he did using them, in detail. The 43-tone ...



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