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34

It is not true in general that the higher you go on the fret board, the lower your harmonic is. Actually, if your were to play an harmonic at the 24th fret, you would hear a note sounding an octave higher than the harmonic at the 12th. Still, however, the harmonics behave differently than fretted notes. Now, let’s get physical and explain why. On perfect ...


12

You might be actually playing A 110, two octaves below A 440. The open A string on a standard tuned guitar is actually two octaves below the A that is normally tuned to 440. To play the A that should be at 440 Hz, you have to play the 5th fret on the high E string, or the 10th on the B string, or the 14th on the G string, etc. Why? The 440 A is the A above ...


6

The spectral effect of hard sync is incredibly varied and not as systematic as AM or FM. However, it is definitely capable of producing inharmonic spectra. Here's an excellent article explaining how hard sync can make synthesis of an acoustic piano more realistic by creating inharmonic sounds reminiscent of the striking of the string by the hammer and such: ...


4

The presumption is that a pitched sound consists of partials that have frequencies that are integer multiples of the fundamental frequency, so that a note with fundamental frequency f (e.g. 100Hz) has partials at f, 2f, 3f (100, 200, 300 Hz) and so on - or in terms of ratios, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and so on. It's these ratios that the deviation is from in an ...


4

The point of consonant intervals (of which chords are mostly comprised) is that the various frequencies are in a ratio of small numbers. Now if the intervals are perfect intervals, the result is a combined signal that has the frequency of the greatest common divisor of all contained frequencies, reminiscent (after frequency separation in the inner ear) of a ...


4

After all the technical answers, try this. Play , say, the 7th fret harmonic, then press down on the EIGHTH fret. Pluck the string BEHIND - as in closer to the nut. You'll find that the note is the same. If there were more, smaller fretwires, you could do this for all the harmonics. You have been fooled into thinking the harmonic nodes only work going DOWN ...


4

My friend, you have just stumbled onto the Harmonic Series. This was something Pythagoras tinkered around with using the monochord, and is primarily responsible for much of how Western music sounds, is written, is analyzed, and is perceived. Very basically, all sound travels through vibration. Since vibrations are made up of waves, each wave has a crest, ...


3

Although I definitely see what you're saying, it's not strictly true that harmonics closer to the nut will be higher. What's happening with natural harmonics is you are dividing the string into to equal parts. An open string will not only vibrate at its fundamental frequency but also at integer multiples of that frequency, each getting higher and quieter. ...


2

The article or book you are asking about is talking about pianos because of the stiffness of the strings and how that makes the piano behave different from how idealized physics says it should behave. The partials of notes created by most musical instruments have integer ratios to the fundamental frequency of the note. For instance, the third partial of a ...


2

Just intonation does produce harmonic sounds; perhaps the most harmonic sounds possible. You are correct that for a Justly tuned system to work, then each of the tones that you use will need to be adjusted relative to the current tonic. Because of this, you are correct to think that there will need to be many different 'flavors' of each note, depending on ...


2

The fun thing about working in the frequency domain is that the maths are really simple. For example, the effect of an equalizer is completely independent of the signal you're feeding it, it's just a simple multiplication of the signal (in frequency domain) with the equalizer frequency response. What I'm getting at is that any visual equalizer already ...


2

The name for the sounds you are describing are indeed called Subharmonics. They were discovered by violinist Mari Kimura in the early 1990's and first presented in 1994. As her website states, I first discovered the technique from an age-old bowing exercise, a modified version of "Son Filé", drawing the bow very slowly but applying slightly more ...


2

When a person hears a combination of sounds which are at many precise or nearly-precise multiples of a common frequency, and are not common multiples of a higher frequency, the person will often perceive a at that common frequency, whose timbre will be influenced by the combination of frequencies above it. This effect can be experienced even if the ...


1

When presented with a (relatively) complex pitched sound, beyond just frequency extraction, your brain does additional processing to identify harmonic patterns, i.e. sets of frequencies where all of them are integer multiples of some fundamental frequency. This is an important part of our pitch perception. Because of this complex processing there is not ...


1

I think the basic of harmonization will do you good. I think the better way of approaching harmony especially when it is for four voices is to think of it as two melody written together with the middle voices giving substance to the thing. So lets consider the following. Your melody voices need a good width. Aim for an octave. Your melodies need to be ...


1

The harmonic nodes are uniformly distributed across the length of the string. at the 12th fret (2x open string frequency) at the 7th and 17th fret (3x open string frequency) at at the (approx) 5th and 24th fret (4x) at the (approx) 4th, 9th, 16th and 28th (5x) and so on for some of nodes closer to the bridge, like the "28th fret" you have to imagine ...


1

Use something hard pushing the string away from the fingerboard. Hard, just like the objects in John Cage's compositions for prepared piano: screws, clothespins, very hard rubber, etc. Of course cellists don't want to damage their fingerboards or strings, so some compromise must be made.


1

Researchers in psychoacoustics and music psychology have been studying this for a long time. I believe it's Plomp and Levitt showed that, with intervals, if you take just the fundamental, interval dissonance simply decreases with interval size (m2, M2, m3, M3...M7...) but if the overtone of each note are added in, you eventually get the well-established ...


1

You can strike a natural harmonic, like a nice G at the octave fret across the D,G,B strings, then play fret 2 on D and 1 on B string to turn it into a C afterwards. If you fret them quickly & decisively, the harmonic of the G still rings and it sounds like harmonics in C - but a chord. I do this sometimes and if I get it right, it can sound really ...


1

If you play the C or F harmonics with your fingernail on the side of the string instead of your fingertip on top of the string, you can bend them into tune (or bend many other harmonics). There is also a C just above the 11th fret of the E strings and an F on the 11th fret of the A string. They're pretty fuzzy sounding and take a lot of pressure. They ...



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