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Something near 250 Hz is what you expect as 3 times the fundamental. If you draw pictures of a sinewave with no motion at the ends of the string, the 3 rd harmonic is the one with a peak in the middle at the same place as the fundamental, and also a peak (going opposite direction) at about 1/6 of the string length which is not far from the hole in the box, ...


6

We hear harmonics because they are physically produced by the instrument; they are not "invented" as some sort of illusion. In fact, we often aren't consciously aware of them, though we can hear their effect on an instrument's timbre, or tone quality. They are caused because when an instrument such a string vibrates, it actually does so at more than one ...


6

The difference is quite simple, and we might be over-complicating it in other answers. Overtone: any resonant frequency above the fundamental frequency. Harmonic: resonant frequency that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. A harmonic is a type of overtone. All resonant frequencies above the fundamental are overtones, but only the ones ...


1

In general, whenever there is a sound, there is more than one frequency occurring simultaneously (exception: A pure sine wave tone has a single frequency). But any periodic function, such as a sound wave, can be written (via a Fourier transform) as a sum of individual sine waves, each with their own frequency and amplitude. If you plot the amplitude of each ...


7

In the context of acoustic analysis: Overtone: any resonant frequency above the fundamental frequency. Harmonic: resonant frequency that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. For almost any^* musical instrument, any time you play a sound, you get a whole series of overtones. The feature of pitched instruments that makes them pitched is ...


0

Harmonics are the pure sine components of periodic signals. The fundamental (which would count as the 1st harmonic using the straightforward numbering system but is actually almost never explicitly called that) has the same frequency as the fundamental period of what you are looking at. The 2nd harmonic has twice the frequency, the 3rd harmonic three times ...


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A non-scientific answer : each sound has a basic frequency. This is called the first harmonic. Why it's a harmonic and not a basic fundamental, I don't know ! Other sounds emanate from the sound source. Those that are twice, thrice, etc. the frequency are called harmonics or overtones, the same thing. Partials, or inharmonic overtones also exist within a ...



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