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I can strongly recommend reading Harry Partch's Genesis of a Music, in which he goes into depth on the history of tunings and the reasons for them. Out of this he derives his 43-tone-to-the-octave scale, and then talks about the instruments he had to build and adapt to play music in this scale, and the compositions he did using them, in detail. The 43-tone ...


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It is neither easy nor difficult to compose in JI, it is not a significant part of the history of western music, especially over the past 600± years. JI is based on the fundamental. Western music in developing tonality is based on sets of hierarchical relationships where 'scale degree' ^1 is more important than ^5, and harmonically, ^5 is more important than ...


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The name for the sounds you are describing are indeed called Subharmonics. They were discovered by violinist Mari Kimura in the early 1990's and first presented in 1994. As her website states, I first discovered the technique from an age-old bowing exercise, a modified version of "Son Filé", drawing the bow very slowly but applying slightly more ...


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When presented with a (relatively) complex pitched sound, beyond just frequency extraction, your brain does additional processing to identify harmonic patterns, i.e. sets of frequencies where all of them are integer multiples of some fundamental frequency. This is an important part of our pitch perception. Because of this complex processing there is not ...



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