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54

There are a ton of easy and great-sounding substitutions, and you can use them in the turnaround or anywhere else you want. Here are a few of the most common: ii-V sub: Substitute ii for IV, so that you have a ii-V turnaround. For example, if you're playing in the key of C, the V chord is G7 and the ii chord is Dm7. So instead of C-F-G7, play C-Dm7-G7. ...


21

Harmonic mixing is the practice of using music theory in your dj sets. You can use this knowledge to achieve specific functions when mixing two songs (similar to chord progressions), or to know which songs are compatible with each other, just to give a few examples. The most common and basic form of harmonic mixing. If you don't want to know about the ...


19

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


18

There are some very simple ways to transform the mood of a song by slight alterations in the melody, harmony or both. A transposition of the melody to the relative minor (ex. from C major to A minor) or to the parallel minor (ex. from C major to C minor) are both very simple ways to retain the melodic material, while drastically changing the sound. ...


18

I think there's an element of pragmatism to this. Some people are out for what they can get, but they also have an eye on what they could lose. Let's say you wrote Stack Exchange Blues, you're collecting royalties from it, and you hear my song Downvotes Got Me Cryin', which you believe steals enough to perhaps warrant a law suit. Well, you're going to have ...


17

Here are quite a few standard substitutions take from page 36 of the free PDF you can download here: http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf


17

This is an A minor chord in first inversion. A is the root note, C is the minor 3rd, E is the perfect 5th. As the C, the 3rd, is at the bottom, this chord is in first inversion. The musical excerpt below shows this with conventional notation. Each chord has the same three pitches of an A minor triad, A C E (R m3 5), but the change to the lowest pitch ...


16

Counterpoint is a type of polyphony with certain restrictions on form. For instance, contrapuntally organized music focuses on melodic interaction between multiple independent voices rather than harmonic interaction. In other words, chords occur as a result of coincident notes in multiple melodic lines rather than as a primary textural element. Other forms ...


16

The basis of counterpoint (point against point) is melody. Harmony is evident in counterpoint which, I suppose, is what is causing the confusion. A theory professor once told me that Harmony is a byproduct of the rules of counterpoint being used properly. Counterpoint changed from renaissance to baroque in some significant ways. Renaissance counterpoint ...


14

Great question - I remember when I myself was confused about this very same thing many years ago, and indeed at first, it all seems completely random. In order to answer your question, there needs to be a little background: Historically, thinking about music in terms of harmonic progression is one that has really only come to complete prominence in the ...


12

I think the difference you would hear would be the difference in the direction and rhythm of the lines. Counterpoint would fill in the melodic "gaps" rhythmically and harmonically. Basic harmony often lines up with the melody. Counterpoint frequently goes opposite the melody, thus its name. Listen to some Baroque music, where counterpoint was used heavily ...


12

In common-practice theory, secondary dominant chords are chromatic harmonies used to approach a non-tonic chord with greater urgency. Let's use C major for examples: I might want to approach the V chord (G) with a secondary dominant to give greater direction or "color" to the approach. I construct the secondary dominant by going to the V chord of the V ...


11

Start out by learning the characteristic sound of a V-I progression. Play only the guide tones (3rd and 7th) and note how the 7th of the V moves down a half step to become the 3rd of the I. Then do the same for the ii-V, noticing how the 7th of the ii moves down a half step to become the 3rd of the V. Then put them together. There are many possible ...


11

Yes. A dissonance is an unstable sound - two or more tones sounding together that demand a resolution towards a consonance, which is a stable sound. "Resolving" a dissonant interval means that it is followed up by a consonant interval. Consonances are divided into perfect and imperfect ones. Perfect consonant intervals are most stable; they are the ...


11

Diatonic substitution is changing a diatonic chord into another diatonic chord with a similar function. For example, in a C major tonality, you can often reharmonize a melody harmonized with F[maj7] with Dm[7] (or vice versa). These chords share some important notes which makes them functionally similar (both have subdominant character). Chromatic ...


11

The primary answer to your question is that although pitch defines the basic frequency of the note, there is—at least in common-practice tonal music, and many other styles too—an entire other trait called function. A C# and a Db are the same pitch (at least on the piano, these will often have slightly different tunings when played by unfretted string ...


10

It surely can be done and it's largely used in, for example, games to signal mood changes to the listener while still conveying the original "idea" of the song. Take as an example the soundtrack to Final Fantasy VI (Final Fantasy III in the USA). The main theme for Terra - one of the protagonists - is a strong yet melancholic song with emphasis on the ...


10

The words denote totally different concepts and the difference lies in the arrangemental intent for the instruments playing tones in parallel octaves: Parallel, or consecutive, octaves If the intent of an arrangement is to have independent voices but two (or more of) them happen to move in parallel at the octave (or in unison, or two or more octaves apart) ...


10

This is an excellent and important question. In a minor key, all 4 possible combinations of 6th and 7th scale degree are used, and each combination corresponds to a scale: b6, b7: natural minor (aeolian) b6, 7: harmonic minor (creates a dominant V chord with a leading tone to the root of the key, so it was 'invented' for harmonic reasons) 6, 7: melodic ...


10

Well, yes, when listening to pop and rock music, it can seem like much of the vocal harmonisation moves in parallel motion (often in thirds and sixths), but there are plenty of examples of different motion out there, if you listen out for them. I've always thought that The Beatles used some subtly interesting vocal harmonies. Below are the first 8 bars of ...


10

We could call this an A7add11 arpeggio. (Or, more accurately, the notes from an A7add11 chord.) Although this is still a set of five pitches, it is no longer a pentatonic scale in the traditional sense; one feature of the related diatonic major and minor pentatonic scales, which are in common usage, is that they do not contain any semitone intervals. ...


9

Visualizing harmonies takes place in what I and others call the aural image; basically, being able to hear music internally with little or no outside stimulus. When instrumentalists practice this, they usually do it by singing, since the voice is that much more closely related to the brain than any given instrument. For all of the above, though, it can be ...


9

Consider how the key change is approached. In Bb, the chord progression is just going from I to IV and back again, i.e. Bb - Eb - Bb - Eb. The key change comes right off of one of those IV chords, so you get a movement from Eb to Eminor. This sounds like a key change up half a step, which is rather common in this genre--this hides the fact that the tonic ...


9

There isn't any hard and fast rule. The first thing is that the key signature narrows it down to two keys. So, for example, if there are no sharps or flats in the key signature, the key is either C major or A minor. Most of the time, the first few measures in the piece will establish whether you're in the major or minor key. Beethoven's 5th symphony is a ...


9

I'm sure someone more experienced will come to help, but for now, here are some suggestions: Make use of dissonant chords. In particular, augumented fifths, and diminished major sevenths. In particular I'd just look into the various scale modes (e.g. Lydian) and pick out chords from there. If it's a slow horror song I'd suggest using a Dorian mode for ...


8

There are a couple interesting idioms used by Prokofiev that stand out for me: Tonal ambiguity and disjunct melody, often using chromatic lines, fourths (quartal harmony), tritones, symmetric scales based on minor or major thirds (octatonic or augmented, respectively), harmonies and melodies involving dissonant minor second and major seventh intervals, ...


8

I like to use 5ths, 4ths, and minor thirds when recording a doubled line. The 4th and 5th thicken the sound and the minor third makes it creepy.


8

As she explains later in the video, she's being extremely contrary to the basic ideas of serialism by implying tonality in the first place. The point of 12-tone serialism as it was designed was to treat each pitch equally so as to not create tonal function by emphasizing one pitch over another. Even if you are operating within these rules, it's possible to ...


8

To answer the question: "Where does the line between what is acceptable to call plagiarism and musical "style" come in to play?" I have to say that unfortunately, pragmatically, it comes down to what you as a plaintiff can prove in court. It really does come down to the law. Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and I am not giving any legal advice, which in any ...


8

Learning to create your own vocal harmony part along with a melody is often something that musicians learn intuitively, through listening to a lot of music, but also by singing in a band or choir. Having said this, there is nothing wrong with taking a short cut towards gaining this skill, by using a little musical knowledge. You can create vocal (or any ...



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