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10

What education did Mozart receive in order to know basic harmony rules, like consecutive fifths are bad? As pointed out, he was educated by his father. He would have received basic training in Rule of the Octave, counterpoint, etc. Instruction in Mozart's time was essentially in voice leading, not harmony: harmony training didn't really exist until ...


8

This is called Transposition. For instance, if you are in C major and have this melody: C-F-E-G-C and you move to E major scale, the melody would be: E-A-G#-B-E. You have to keep the intervals the same (A perfect fourth remains a perfect fourth etc), but the notes change.


5

A common place for this to occur is IV to iv, often then returning to I, which makes (in your F key) the Db a semitone from C, and Bb a semitone from A, both found in the F chord. The F, of course, remains static. It's the same sort of semitone pull that makes V7 work so well as a dominant, to I. 'Major to minor' is one way to describe it. Ironically, in ...


4

The chord basic progression I - VI - IV - II - V - I has been around almost as long as tonal music. Pop song writers have used it hundreds of times, and so did Mozart. In the key of F, that is F - Dm - Bb - Gm - C - F. Add a few 7ths if you want, of course. But you can precede almost any chord with its "secondary dominant". The dominant of Dm is A, so F - ...


3

As others have stated there is a temporary modulation. But the particular change you are referring to (IV to iv) actually comes from the Harmonic Major Scale. The scale was named by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. For instance a C harmonic major scale consists of the notes C D E F G Ab B (C). Contrary to the usual (ionian) major scale: C D E F G A B. Some good ...


3

A Consecutive fifth is something that comes out of the linear thinking of polyphonic music (in contrast to homophonic music - not monophonic). So when leading your voices of a composition - these carry every functionality. Harmony, melody, rhythm, accompaniment but - in a linear way. You are undermining their individuality by squeezing them into kind of a ...


3

It's just a temporary modulation. In jazz and older pop music, this shows up frequently in a progression called "downstep modulation", where you have sequential iim-V7-Is a whole step lower, so for example: Am7-D7-GMaj7 Gmin7-C7-FMaj7, Fm7 ...


3

This progression immediately reminds me of Creep by Radiohead, though it is in C major, not F major. While there is no natural key containing F major and A major, these two chords together are very common in most genres, but especially in rock, which loves minor to major substitutions. D minor is the relative minor of F major, and while the key of D minor ...


2

There a lot one can do when writing creating a progression to introduce chords that would not necessarily be found in within the same key. In fact, There isn't a key that naturally contains both an F major chord and an A major chord, but I'll focused on the chords you're interested in which is the Bb major and the Bb minor. For simplicity let's say these ...


2

Listen to, oh, I dunno...Paul McCartney. He's ALL OVER THE PLACE in terms of busy lines. And his stuff works great. One of the issues with catching tension notes in the bass is the concept of "low interval limits." What happens when you violate low interval limits, is that the interval that you're playing ceases to sound like that interval, instead ...


2

There's two issues here: what happens in music NOTATION, and what happens in the MUSIC, when you transpose to a different key. The short answer on the music notation is that the pitch intervals from note to note of a transposed melody don't change when you change the key, thus for example if you had a melody in the key of C, starting on the note E, then ...


2

Yes, moving chromatically within one voice is totally fine. It's actually a secret trick composers use to get choirs to sing atonal / pantonal music. That said, if it's too chromatic, you'll have problems. Typically in choral writing, certain movements are "not allowed" because they are difficult to "hear" in the mind before the person sings. Intervals ...


1

1) Context and guesswork. Some composers will probably be easier than others, depending on how forceful or vague their harmonies are. Soprano and bass lines are probably more important than inner voices, etc. 2) Look at a larger phrase, see if there is a goal? Odd cases might include harmonic sequences (-5/+4 or other such standard walks), tonicization or ...


1

Seeing as Major scales have semitones all in the same place transposing between different Major keys will still garner similar (If not identical) general Major tonality. You often want to do this for practical considerations. Guitar music that is not written specifically for guitar almost always has to be transposed either to E / A or D. This does not take ...



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