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15

I would argue that your premise that the chords used in a song should be comprised of notes that occur in the scale of the tonic key doesn't really hold. Yes, the majority of songs tend to use almost exclusively diatonic triads, however, there are many example of non-diatonic chords, for instance, borrowed chords and secondary dominants. In traditional ...


11

On a basic level, this is just a modal chord progression using the Mixolydian mode, which contains a b7 scale degree. That makes the notes you're using G A B C D E F G. The G major triad (G B D) and the F major triad (F A C) are both right in there. But doesn't necessarily reconcile other chords aside from those two (assuming not all the songs you're talking ...


5

There are already some good answers, but I'd like to add an important term for a concept which is able to explain really a lot of occurrences of non-diatonic chords in popular music (and not only there). The concept is called modal interchange [1], which is the borrowing of chords from parallel tonalities. The borrowing of chords from the parallel minor key ...


5

I think there are some assumptions in your question that are false. First: Quartal harmony emerges and starts getting used extensively in Western music in the late-19th-, early-20th century. At the same time, many composers were also exploring different ideas about how chords can connect, including chord planing, which involves holding the same chord ...


4

I'm not sure that parallel motion is invariable - I think back to a lot of middle period Bartók (although he almost invariably spices the harmony with augmented fourths) - but I think in situations such as the examples you have given here, the colour, the sonority of fourths is a consideration. These are essentially melodic gestures that are coloured by the ...


2

While not present in these examples, the inversions of the quartal triad (a stack of three perfect fourths) often go unnoticed and are, in fact, essential to utilizing common tones in quartal harmony. Consider the chord (from lowest to highest) A-D-G. If we consider this to be the root position of the quartal triad, then its first inversion is D-G-A (known ...


2

I would make one distinction here in particular. Though not necessarily always the case, often times chords such as this are not so much quartal chords as they are quartal voicings. This is a good bit more obvious in the Jazz example. The example you provided also shows the chord symbols above, which are all indeed traditional triad based chords within ...


2

To supplement the previous answers, I would say that the diminished vii° chord formed from the notes of the major scale is unsatisfactory for many musical styles due to its dissonance (it has a tritone instead of a perfect fifth). When a consonant triad on the seventh degree is wanted, the easiest solution is to chromatically lower the root of the chord. ...


2

Here is what I hear: || Dmaj9 | D/C | Bbmaj7 | Ab7 | D(add 9) || The logic behind it - at least the way I hear it - is the bass line moving down in (major) seconds. The Bbmaj7 is borrowed from D minor (and it is what you correctly hear as iv, i.e. Gm7, which is basically the same thing as a Bbmaj7). I must admit that I don't have a good idea for ...


2

Guitarists tend to learn chord shapes, and to learn rules about what chord can come next. But chords aren't stand-alone entities, they're a collection of notes which, seperately or in combination, create tensions which can be resolved by moving to other notes. You know that G7 wants to go to C. (Otherwise why would it be a pleasant surprise when it goes ...


1

Why does it seem to work so well? The ♭VII major chord has a strong harmonic relationship to the tonic. Within the first few harmonics (with most instruments) there are overtones that approximately correspond to the lowered seventh and the second degrees of the tonic scale, which are the first and third of the ♭VII chord: 1st harmonic = fundamental ...


1

Riff on these chords: C Eb F Eb C Now try: C Bb C Bb... (On Broadway) How about: F C G D A (Let's do the Time Warp again) Have your fixed ideas of what is allowed in a popular song loosened up a bit? :-) No need for special arguments about shifting mode. In C major you can use chords of Eb, Bb (and a whole lot more) without changing key, mode or ...


1

The other answers are best. But do also make sure you've actually got the key of the song correct. (I mention that just because people often learn the rule "songs have chord progressions comprised of notes from the scale of the song's key" at about the same time as rules like "songs have chord progressions beginning and ending on the root", or "songs have ...


1

Casey and Dan's answers are great. To add to Casey's, the F leads nicely to Em. In Roman numerals, this would be VII -> vi. Pink Floyd uses this progression on Dark Side of the Moon, in the song Breathe (and maybe another song on that album as well). When used well, non-diatonic chords really do amazing things to music!



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