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9

Melodic Inversion Where the original melody goes up by an interval, the inverted melody goes down by the same interval. Sometimes you do it where you keep the same number of semi-tones (sometimes you do a "diatonic" inversion and just keep the scale degree). It's a technique for taking given melodic content and constructing more, related melodic content. ...


7

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


6

One of the central harmonic (and melodic) innovations of early 20th-century music was the conflation of the linear and harmonic dimensions. That is to say, a collection of pitches might just as easily be a motive or a melody as it might be a chord. In the common-practice world the linear, melodic dimension tends to be dominated by whole and half steps while ...


5

There is no "have to" in music. There are common patterns and conventions, but the only rule is, if it sounds good, it is good. it doesn't sound out of place at the time ... and therefore it's OK. I have no idea what the implications of this may be if I was to try and apply EQ, or add certain effects, and so on EQ generally has very little effect ...


4

It sounds like you are starting to study harmony and music theory, though. As you progress, things will start to make more sense to you. What makes Shostakovich select such dissonant notes freely? One way of looking at this: composers in a certain period or style eventually start to chafe with the rules of their period, and start to push the envelope. ...


2

Are you familiar with pitch-class set analysis? The pioneering work was done by Allen Forte in his books, The Structure of Atonal Music and The Harmonic Organization of The Rite of Spring. If you can get hold of it, John Rahn's book Basic Atonal Theory presents Forte's ideas and methods in a much more user-friendly manner. The basic idea is to convert ...


2

The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine has some of what you are looking for.


1

If you are looking for Jazz theory, The Lydian Chromatic Concept by George Russell would be a great starting point. The original came out in the early 1950's and it was extremely influential on players like Miles Davis. It is often credited with being one of the primary inspirations for later movements in jazz, especially modal jazz. Rock, blues, and heavy ...


1

It is difficult to play melodic lines which don't sound like scale patterns. For that you need a good (I dare say) natural melodic sense but also there are some tricks that help you in getting a focused melodic sound. You can stress root notes /tone like a superfast drone note, but that is almost like harmonizing There is a good technic on drawing chords, ...



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