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9

As topo morto already commented, it doesn't really make sense to consider pop as just an evolution of classical music. It has lots of influences from folk, blues, jazz that don't really make sense from a classical-harmony perspective. To a large degree, you might also just sum pop up as “relax, focus on keeping the melody simple&catchy and then ...


4

One point of view is given by Peter van der Merwe in a couple of interesting books. "Origins of the Popular Style: The Antecedents of Twentieth-Century Popular Music" and "Roots of the Classical: the Popular Origins of Western Music." Another interesting book is Alec Wilder's "American Popular Song" but it only covers the period up to about 1950. ...


2

I think you're complicating your work with a simple misconception: classical music was just the pop music of its day. It's incredibly broad, and 99% of the classical music composed is mostly forgotten - what we're playing as classical music nowadays is cherry picked, "best of the best" (which is inherently subjective, of course). Tracing the "evolution" of ...


2

4 voices are common. The classic "Glenn Miller" sound had the melody doubled on tenor sax and clarinet an octave apart, with the three other saxes harmonising within that octave. So that's 4 independent parts. Also look at the "locked hands" piano style associated with George Shearing.The Baroque composers regularly wrote 4-part counterpoint (that's even ...


2

Taking that a nominal chord will have 3 notes - root, 3rd and 5th, before getting to the octave of the root, it's 3. Even with first or second inversion. However, 2nds (or 9ths), 6ths and some sort of 7ths will also fit with the original triad. Not all at the same time, but 1,2,3,5 works. As does 1,3,5,6, or 1,3,5,7. Going over the octave, but not ...


2

Yes, you would use C major in first inversion leading to D minor. You would probably handle the upbeat in the previous bar as G minor in root position, so the progression is ii/V - V6/V - vi/V, which is a classic deceptive cadence. As ttw notes, inversions are frequently used in phrases where a strong authentic cadence isn't required.


2

A first inversion dominant chord is fine in a non-final cadence. Some texts class these as "imperfect cadences." The root movement is V-I (or V-i) but one or both chords are not in root position. The final cadence in a piece (or section of a piece) almost always has both chords in root position. Often first inversion chords are used to produce a more ...



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