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5

This is generally true of a melody in a major key. However, things can be more complicated in actual usage. If the melody contains chromatic notes that are not in the key, the basic three chords may not work. Also if the melody modulates into an entirely different key than the original key, it won't work either. There are many songs where the melody does ...


4

The whole passage is essentially a linear elaboration of V♭9. Let's "de-broken-chord" it: it fairly leaps to the eye what Beethoven is doing here when you see the voices. Note that we're getting a big A♭-G appoggiatura in the top voice, but the inner voices are marching up and down in minor thirds between the chord tones of the dominant (marked "+") in ...


2

The best way to look at it is as you stated as the C♯ and E as non harmonic tones leading to the D and the F respectively. It could be looked at as a variation of a Neapolitan 6th where the 3rd is minor instead of major that goes to the iio instead of V especially since if you look at it as different enharmonic equivalents of D♭, F♭, and ...


2

First off a power chord is a modern name for something that has been around forever in music which is the perfect 5th specifically parallel fifths when used in succession. There is nothing special about the use of them in modern music or classical music and in fact when the melody is introduced the full chord is typically shown in the harmony regardless of ...


2

The I,IV,V are the basic chords in a scale. The other chords (ii,iii,vi, vii) can be 'created' from these chords by substituting some notes for some other. Let's take the C major scale: I: C,E,G IV: F,A,C V: G,B,D The remaining chords are: ii: D,F,A -- Take IV, remove C and add D. iii: E,G,B -- Take V, remove D and add E. vi: A,C,E -- Take I, remove G and ...



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