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6

You were right on when you said that this chord "toys with switching to the minor scale." In classical musical analysis, the major chord built on the flattened third is considered a "borrowed chord", a chord that is borrowed from the minor version of the key. In Roman numberal analysis, it is written exactly as you would expect: â™­III. Like many other ...


3

Adding to @Casey Rule's answer: the set of chords that generally works with a key are (in C) C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am and Bo, with their 7ths if appropriate. There is also, in theory, the set of chords from the 'parallel' minor.In this case, Cm - (relative major being Eb). This gives the chords from Eb major - Eb, Fm, Gm, Ab, Bb, Cm and Do.There's now a far wider ...


3

As with most of the questions on this site, the answer is practice. Do lots of singing in harmony, and it will become second-nature. But how do you get started? Learn a song's harmony part by rote, and sing that alongside someone else singing the melody (or a recording of yourself). The simplest harmony part is a third harmony -- that is, whatever the ...


1

"...the particular role/reputation of each chord in a movement..." The key term you're looking for here is functional harmony. In a typical harmonic analysis, you determine what the chords are in terms of their root (e.g. 4th scale degree) and their quality (e.g. major chord, with a major 7th) to determine the name of the chord (e.g. IVmaj7). In functional ...


1

Two thoughts: Look at the linear shape of the melody. Notice implied harmonies for each measure. Consider which notes might be important (clear chord tones) and which ones are less important (neighbor and / or passing tones). Look at how the melody is accented agogically. Notice which notes have longer durations than others. In a melody, longer notes ...


1

It might be easiest to work backwards -- the most obvious cadence point is going to be the last few notes. You can bet the last chord is expected to be the I, D major. Prior to that you would expect a V(7) or occasionally the IV. We see an E in the melody so assume V7, or A7 in our key of D. Just before that is an F#, what might that be? It doesn't ...


1

Singing harmony is just a skill. It can certainly be learned, like any other skill. You didn't specify what type of context you're planning on singing harmony in (a choir? a home studio? a band? just driving around in the car?), nor what your current level of musical knowledge/experience is (Do you play any instruments? Can you read music? Do you know any ...



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