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I would actually consider this to be ♭III - IV - I in B major, with the ♭III borrowed from the parallel minor key. In fact, with the ♭III chord, it's somewhat similar in character to one of the "Fellowship of the Ring" themes: I - ♭III - I (in your key, that would be Bmaj - Dmaj - Bmaj). It's the first three chords here. Soundtracks aside, this type of ...


4

Not all the chords in a chord progression need to be strictly in the key. The best way to look at this chord progression is a ♭VII - I - V in the key of E major. The D major chord is a chord that exists in E mixolydian (on of the other modes of E) and it is very common for someone playing in the key of E major to borrow it. The E major and B major are ...


4

What I think fits perfectly here is that you are on the G major scale and you borrow a chord from the G minor scale. The chords G major and A minor fit perfectly with the scale and C minor is the 4th chord from the G minor scale. You are allowed to do that and it sound pretty good; it is also pretty common. Here is an example where Elvis uses it: ...


3

Harmony is just multiple notes sounding at the same time. Counterpoint is the technique of creating harmony by interweaving multiple melody lines. So they are not at all mutually exclusive. One is a technique for creating the other. Harmony created by counterpoint could be said to give a more complex or layered sound than other means of harmony. They could ...


2

Far more often than not, the first full bar of a song contains the key chord. This 'sets the scene' for the listener. and establishes 'home'. In this case, it COULD be in C minor, which then brings the Am into question. This is explained away with the idea of 'parallel key', which gives another set of harmonies to use. As in not only the Cm set - Cm, Fm, ...


2

Well, counterpoint is not harmonization. The main difference is that counterpoint has its own melodic and rhythmic identity. If you take a look at, say, Bach's great choral works, you'll find some pieces labelled "Choral" which are mainly a melody with harmonization, and some pieces labelled "Chorus" which are strongly oriented along lines of counterpoint ...


1

Write the song with the melody BEFORE you worry about what key it's in. I think you'll only limit yourself (box yourself in) if you try to choose a key first (since it sounds like you've mostly learned by ear up to this point, anyways.) Make the song/tune/piece sound good to you first and then you can figure out what key it's in. I've played with some ...


1

Honestly, it could fit in several different keys, including C major, C minor, G major. There's not enough data here to tell for sure. At least one of the chords must be borrowed, though, since there is no single key that contains the E natural (in Am and C) and the E flat (in Cm). In order to define a key, you really need a cadence: a dominant-tonic ...


1

No; each are separate. Harmony is vertical and treats tones as singular, sonorous entities. Counterpoint is horizontal, and indicates direction. There is harmony in counterpoint, however, it is treated as incidental with the priority being the emphasis of musical line and direction. Each is separate but equal. You could be a master of voice-leading but ...


1

It depends entirely on the genre, and that is actually one of the defining characteristics of genre. most pop: probably, and mostly. Sometimes augmented by the occasional secondary dominant. Part of why they are so "easy to hear". But if it's torch-songy pop, probably not because they borrow a lot from the style of standards musical theatre or standards or ...



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