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21

Harmonic mixing is the practice of using music theory in your dj sets. You can use this knowledge to achieve specific functions when mixing two songs (similar to chord progressions), or to know which songs are compatible with each other, just to give a few examples. The most common and basic form of harmonic mixing. If you don't want to know about the ...


19

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


18

I think there's an element of pragmatism to this. Some people are out for what they can get, but they also have an eye on what they could lose. Let's say you wrote Stack Exchange Blues, you're collecting royalties from it, and you hear my song Downvotes Got Me Cryin', which you believe steals enough to perhaps warrant a law suit. Well, you're going to have ...


17

This is an A minor chord in first inversion. A is the root note, C is the minor 3rd, E is the perfect 5th. As the C, the 3rd, is at the bottom, this chord is in first inversion. The musical excerpt below shows this with conventional notation. Each chord has the same three pitches of an A minor triad, A C E (R m3 5), but the change to the lowest pitch ...


14

Great question - I remember when I myself was confused about this very same thing many years ago, and indeed at first, it all seems completely random. In order to answer your question, there needs to be a little background: Historically, thinking about music in terms of harmonic progression is one that has really only come to complete prominence in the ...


11

Diatonic substitution is changing a diatonic chord into another diatonic chord with a similar function. For example, in a C major tonality, you can often reharmonize a melody harmonized with F[maj7] with Dm[7] (or vice versa). These chords share some important notes which makes them functionally similar (both have subdominant character). Chromatic ...


11

In common-practice theory, secondary dominant chords are chromatic harmonies used to approach a non-tonic chord with greater urgency. Let's use C major for examples: I might want to approach the V chord (G) with a secondary dominant to give greater direction or "color" to the approach. I construct the secondary dominant by going to the V chord of the V ...


10

Well, yes, when listening to pop and rock music, it can seem like much of the vocal harmonisation moves in parallel motion (often in thirds and sixths), but there are plenty of examples of different motion out there, if you listen out for them. I've always thought that The Beatles used some subtly interesting vocal harmonies. Below are the first 8 bars of ...


10

Yes. A dissonance is an unstable sound - two or more tones sounding together that demand a resolution towards a consonance, which is a stable sound. "Resolving" a dissonant interval means that it is followed up by a consonant interval. Consonances are divided into perfect and imperfect ones. Perfect consonant intervals are most stable; they are the ...


10

We could call this an A7add11 arpeggio. (Or, more accurately, the notes from an A7add11 chord.) Although this is still a set of five pitches, it is no longer a pentatonic scale in the traditional sense; one feature of the related diatonic major and minor pentatonic scales, which are in common usage, is that they do not contain any semitone intervals. ...


9

There isn't any hard and fast rule. The first thing is that the key signature narrows it down to two keys. So, for example, if there are no sharps or flats in the key signature, the key is either C major or A minor. Most of the time, the first few measures in the piece will establish whether you're in the major or minor key. Beethoven's 5th symphony is a ...


8

To answer the question: "Where does the line between what is acceptable to call plagiarism and musical "style" come in to play?" I have to say that unfortunately, pragmatically, it comes down to what you as a plaintiff can prove in court. It really does come down to the law. Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and I am not giving any legal advice, which in any ...


8

Learning to create your own vocal harmony part along with a melody is often something that musicians learn intuitively, through listening to a lot of music, but also by singing in a band or choir. Having said this, there is nothing wrong with taking a short cut towards gaining this skill, by using a little musical knowledge. You can create vocal (or any ...


8

Two modes are parallel if they share the same tonic. That is, D Major, D Minor, D Dorian, and D Mixolydian are all parallel modes. Using a parallel mode will cause a chromatic alteration to your usual key signature. For example, Dorian uses #6 and Phrygian uses b2 (when compared to a minor key or Aeolian mode), while Mixolydian uses b7 and Lydian uses #4 ...


8

Harmony refers to the "vertical" relationship between simultaneous pitches in a musical texture (usually, but not always, chords - see below for the exception). However, it also refers to the "horizontal" relationships between successive vertical relationships of pitches; it's probably easiest to think of these as chord progressions. The exception, mentioned ...


7

I'll give some general tips but really I think you can't beat the books I'll mention below as a guide on how to write euphonious counterpoint. As far as the order of composing voices, Schoenberg's advice was that you have to be able to hear the full harmony as you write it. I believe he set a good value at 4 voices at once. That's one way to look at it. ...


7

I think the confusion comes when ideas are lumped together. From a harmonic perspective, the bass note determines what is the inversion of the chord and given C in the bass and E-G-C the chord is a C in root position. That being said however, from a pianist perspective, the closed form in the upper voices is a C chord in first inversion. When grabbing ...


7

"methods for constructing a musical motive" For me, it doesn't work like that. A melody comes to me, and in retrospect, I find the motives. I can't really explain how that works, a motive is just anything that I recognize as a distinct unit - some kind of pattern. Whether something is a pattern is to some extent subjective. Melodic and rhytmic properties ...


6

Your question is a bit too open-ended to be answered completely and all the comments that have been made already give you useful pointers. Said simply: your ear has been trained by what you have heard over the years. When you hear a few notes, your brain will want to make sense of it, fall back onto its feet, the same way that you make sense of a few dots ...


6

I'll qualify my answer here by saying I've studied jazz theory more as an improviser than as a composer. My first thought is that you should study some jazz tunes to learn a bit more about the kinds of harmony that are used. Learning a bit about chords with extensions would be helpful as well, but actually I consider that more a 'stylistic' addition than a ...


6

First let me make this remark: as always when analyzing, know what key you are in and look for accidentals outside the key. If there are no accidentals outside the key then you can't be dealing with a secondary dominant. Now let's look at the chords in the key of C major: ii: D F A V/V: D F# A ii7: D F A C V7/V: D F# A C As you can see the ...


6

I have often used graph paper to create a left-to-right timeline where each cube of the graph paper represents a unit of time (say 5 seconds, or 15 seconds). I then "draw" the form, sometimes getting carried away with colored pencils and such. I then try to compose the music in-line with the formal diagram. This doesn't always work and sometimes leads to ...


6

I don't know your level, so this may seem too simple or too advanced. Hopefully there's something here to help you. Improve your ear training. Listen to intervals (start with melodic intervals, then progress to harmonic intervals) and try to determine what they are from their sound. If you google for online ear training, you can find several websites that ...


6

An avoid note is a chord tension which creates an interval of a minor ninth (or less) above a chord voice. Chord voices are the 1, 3, 5, and 7. Chord tensions are the 9, 11, and 13. As I recall, the Imaj11 sounds terrible. On the other hand, the iimin11 is fine (because of the b3). Ditto the vimin11. And the IVmaj#11 sounds fine as well. The avoid notes ...


6

Harmony supports the melody. Polyphony is when there is more than one independent melody. The basic idea is that in polyphony is that each melody can stand on its own independent of the other melody. Common examples of this are rounds, fuges, and counterpoint. In the case of harmony, everything supports the melody. Their may be secondary melodies or the ...


6

The term for chord connections like this, where each note of the chords changes (usually chromatically, almost always step-wise) one-by-one, is linear harmony. It's quite common in Liszt, Scubert, Schumann, etc. Roman numeral analysis is mostly pointless during linear harmony passages, most analysts will either just label it as linear harmony until the next ...


5

With regard to the jazz examples, there really is a theory. It may not have been studied by musicologists at the start or taught in college classes, but it was there, and was picked up and understood by the musicians. In this case when I say "theory" I mean a mental model that has both explanatory and predictive power. It is easy to see that there is a ...


5

It's nearly as simple as that. Nearly. But - harmony such as you illustrate here is made up from the notes of the scale, yes - but, everything does not move exactly parallel as I think you say. Let's take a 1-3-5, say in Cmaj. C-E (1-3) is a major third, which is 4 frets, and the 3-5 is a minor third, which is 3 frets. So the spacing is 4 frets then 3 frets. ...


5

It works for several reasons. I don't have a list of songs that follow a similar format, but it should not be too hard to find some. If I think of any, I will update this post. One of the main reasons why this works, is because Aminor is relative to Cmajor. The relative minor of a major scale is called the Aeolian mode. Which means that the natural Aminor ...


5

I don't know the context of that particular song, but when it comes to naming chords, the octave in which the pitches reside is (usually) irrelevant -- a fact called octave equivalence. This allows you to re-order the notes into any order, to find the chord name. In this case, the perfect 4th (E to A) inverts to a perfect 5 if you drop the A below the E, ...



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