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19

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


18

I think there's an element of pragmatism to this. Some people are out for what they can get, but they also have an eye on what they could lose. Let's say you wrote Stack Exchange Blues, you're collecting royalties from it, and you hear my song Downvotes Got Me Cryin', which you believe steals enough to perhaps warrant a law suit. Well, you're going to have ...


17

Harmonic mixing is the practice of using music theory in your dj sets. You can use this knowledge to achieve specific functions when mixing two songs (similar to chord progressions), or to know which songs are compatible with each other, just to give a few examples. The most common and basic form of harmonic mixing. If you don't want to know about the ...


8

To answer the question: "Where does the line between what is acceptable to call plagiarism and musical "style" come in to play?" I have to say that unfortunately, pragmatically, it comes down to what you as a plaintiff can prove in court. It really does come down to the law. Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, and I am not giving any legal advice, which in any ...


8

Well, yes, when listening to pop and rock music, it can seem like much of the vocal harmonisation moves in parallel motion (often in thirds and sixths), but there are plenty of examples of different motion out there, if you listen out for them. I've always thought that The Beatles used some subtly interesting vocal harmonies. Below are the first 8 bars of ...


7

As she explains later in the video, she's being extremely contrary to the basic ideas of serialism by implying tonality in the first place. The point of 12-tone serialism as it was designed was to treat each pitch equally so as to not create tonal function by emphasizing one pitch over another. Even if you are operating within these rules, it's possible to ...


7

I'll give some general tips but really I think you can't beat the books I'll mention below as a guide on how to write euphonious counterpoint. As far as the order of composing voices, Schoenberg's advice was that you have to be able to hear the full harmony as you write it. I believe he set a good value at 4 voices at once. That's one way to look at it. ...


7

I think the confusion comes when ideas are lumped together. From a harmonic perspective, the bass note determines what is the inversion of the chord and given C in the bass and E-G-C the chord is a C in root position. That being said however, from a pianist perspective, the closed form in the upper voices is a C chord in first inversion. When grabbing ...


6

I'll qualify my answer here by saying I've studied jazz theory more as an improviser than as a composer. My first thought is that you should study some jazz tunes to learn a bit more about the kinds of harmony that are used. Learning a bit about chords with extensions would be helpful as well, but actually I consider that more a 'stylistic' addition than a ...


6

Your question is a bit too open-ended to be answered completely and all the comments that have been made already give you useful pointers. Said simply: your ear has been trained by what you have heard over the years. When you hear a few notes, your brain will want to make sense of it, fall back onto its feet, the same way that you make sense of a few dots ...


6

First let me make this remark: as always when analyzing, know what key you are in and look for accidentals outside the key. If there are no accidentals outside the key then you can't be dealing with a secondary dominant. Now let's look at the chords in the key of C major: ii: D F A V/V: D F# A ii7: D F A C V7/V: D F# A C As you can see the ...


5

With regard to the jazz examples, there really is a theory. It may not have been studied by musicologists at the start or taught in college classes, but it was there, and was picked up and understood by the musicians. In this case when I say "theory" I mean a mental model that has both explanatory and predictive power. It is easy to see that there is a ...


4

Using your system, with 0 as the Root of the scale, the major chord starting from that root will always be {0,4,7} and the minor will always be {0,3,7} :) I'm not sure what you mean by the grade of the scale? If you mean the degree, (eg starting on the 2nd note of the major scale) then usually Your chord would be minor(taking the 2, 4 and 6), but because ...


4

Indeed, common practice tonal analysis really begins to break down around the turn of the century. One of the problems theorists, composers, and musicians are encountering today is that the horizon is now so wide, there is no single zeitgeist through which musicians operate. This is unique because it has never occurred throughout music history before the ...


3

Part of this can be answered by the idea of Function. Within the Western music tradition chords serve a function, that is they play a role. The most commonly known term from this thought process is the Dominant function, built on the V of the key. The Dominant chord is named such because it has the most tension and most desire to resolve back to the ...


3

First, you need to translate your list of pitches into frequencies in hertz. This is the basis of what you need for a harmony. Doubling the frequency puts the note up an octave and halving it lowers it an octave. Playing bot the original tone and your upper/lower octaver will give you a primative pitch shifter kind of sound like this track uses an octave ...


3

I would say that the song is in the key of C the whole time. I would only analyze the bridge as a modulation if you were not playing in Aeolian, which would have to be Dorian given the major chord a whole step below. However, if I were analyzing for a school assignment I would probably put both or justify why you chose one or the other in the written ...


3

This is an interesting summary of the whole George Harrison My Sweet Lord/He's So Fine plagiarism case, with some discussion of the legal issues involved: http://abbeyrd.best.vwh.net/mysweet.htm Of course, there are many examples of legal plagiarism of classical tunes. To name three: "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows" was taken from the middle of Chopin's ...


3

Folk, country and blues draw on what is called "the oral tradition". Song "families" have always been part of the oral tradition, and building on -- even re-using -- pre-existing harmonic/melodic structures was/is common practice in those genres. Artists in those genres just kind of "get" that's the case. In the oral tradition, there was no concept of ...


3

The ii of a major key is a triad (in C) D-F-A. adding a minor 7th will make it minor 7th ( !!) -D-F-A-C. This usually resolves to C through the V - G, or G7. When a piece may modulate to its dominant (now we're in G ), that ii usually becomes a II, as in D - F# - A (with the optional 7th of C ).That produces the tritone tension to take the piece ...


3

A modal chord progression would just be a chord progression in whatever mode you are in. The following explains chords in each mode where an upper case Roman numeral is a major chord, a lower case Roman numeral is a minor chord, and a lower case Roman numeral followed by a 'o' is a diminished chord. A 7 next to a chord just means it has a dominat 7th(used ...


3

You're very unlikely to find any sort of polyphonic tonal music that has zero parallel motion. The rules of counterpoint proscribe the use of parallel 5ths and octaves, but not any other intervals (4ths are somewhat frowned upon), so avoiding parallel motion entirely wouldn't be an intent on the part of a composer. The reason that 5ths and 8ths are ...


2

Chris - you have many questions in a row, so I thought it easier to submit an answer rather than post several comments. To moderators, I apologize if this is cluttersome. Here we go: 1.) You are correct, you did not in fact make that statement - I did not realize that you were quoting Cuthbert. I will expand upon this answer momentarily. 2.) The ...


2

C key means tonality, C root is a C chord in the root position (with lowest note C). This can though have different interpretations in different countries, C root might also mean a chord (like F or Am) that has a C as lowest note. There are always many ways to analyse, different ways to see it that are correct. I would say depending on the size/length of ...


2

I don't know this song (and having a beer in the sun, so listening is not realy an option, haha) but I think I can help you though. First of all, I would like to advise you to write in the same key if you want this kind of info, it's much easier to see what is the "odd thing" here (more about the "odd thing" below) Secondly, you should ask yourself the ...


2

This is a hugely complicated question based on the style, the instrument, and voicing among other things. Generally chords that have more common tones with the chord in the progression makes for a more harmonious sound. For example C major = CEG, E min = EGB, and Amin = ACE, so the shared notes make a harmonious sound happen if you play notes of E minor ...


2

Preface Edit: I do not believe "Synthetic Modulation" exists in the music theory lexicon. I had to look this up, Wikipedia "In music, a synthetic scale is a scale which has been derived from a traditional diatonic major scale through the alteration of one degree by a semitone in either direction." Modulation usually refers to taking the same scale, but ...


2

Such thematic variation happens in most movies produced in the past fifty years. Just choose one that you like, turn off the distracting video, and listen. Darth Vader's theme changes every time. (This trick comes from film theorist Michel Chion.) Of course, the granddaddy is Richard Wagner's four-opera cycle The Ring of the Nibelung: fourteen hours of ...


2

If you're aim is the add a third voice between the two written voices, make sure that you take that into account when you write the second voice. If your second voice is going to force the third voice into taking a certain note then make sure to put that in at that point. If a few measures later you again will be forcing the third voice into a certain ...


2

Examining the history of Western music might be helpful here. Contrary to what you might expect, polyphony, or multiple independent melodies sounding simultaneously, came before homophony, or melody with harmony/chords. The first examples of Western music were just single-voice melodies — think Gregorian chanting. Since each octave had the same pitches, and ...



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