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0

Adding to Dom's comprehensive answer, there's also Amaj., Dmaj, and Emaj., all found as dominants to the minor keys of D, G and A respectively, mentioned above. There are also chords which fit songs from the parallel keys. D minor's being D major. Thus D, Em, F#m, G, A, Bm and Co. So, for each list, change the parent key maj. to min., and vice versa. This ...


5

The key you are in defines the harmony, what chords you naturally have access to, and what the tonic is. From a single chord alone you cannot determine for sure either the key or the tonic, especially for a minor chord which doesn't have as strong a pull towards other chords as, say, a dominant chord. There are a few possibilities depending which key you ...


5

Would this fall into the boundaries of harmony? The answer is simple and it's yes. There are many kinds of harmony. The blues harmony is different than the jazz which is different than the classical etc.


3

I have no idea what Bartok was thinking when he wrote this, but one way to create something similar would be: 1. Start with a "big idea". In this case, "hey, what happens if the left hand plays the white keys and the right hand the black keys". (OK, that's not quite accurate because the right hand plays the white key B, but you get the idea). 2. Figure out ...


7

As you know, the II V I progression is the most important progression in jazz. Since there is a very strong root motion of a descending perfect fifth, not only between V and I, but also between II and V, this II-V-progression has become an independent unit, which is frequently used without the need to resolve to the related I chord. It is important to ...


1

As a cadence, it's called imperfect - the opposite of perfect, it doesn't quite arrive back at home like most of us expect. In Satin doll, instead, it goes to other ii-Vs which further confound the listener who feels a modulation to another key. It does actually land at the end of the sequence on bar 7. The middle section then moves to subdom F, then ...


5

Look what the score is doing: you have an oscillation rising from F♯ in the initial RH part, moving up to C♯, but artfully dodging A♯. At the same time, you have an accompaniment that consists largely of the fifth D-A alternating with the auxiliary notes E-G. The entire section is acting like an elaboration of a D major chord in a kind of quasi-Lydian ...


1

The chromatic scale is made of 12 semitones. When you consider this in a non tonal way, there are several ways to evenly split these 12 semitones: 12 semitones, the chomatic scale 6 tones e.g. C D E F# G# A#, the tone scales 4 minor thirds e.g. C Eb Gb A, the diminished chord 3 major thirds, e.g. C E G#, the augmented chord. These divisions are related ...


1

If you're talking about keyboard playing, beware of playing close position chords in the LH. That register can get muddy, and it's where bass lines (or maybe counter-melodies), not chords, belong. If you want a C chord, play the notes of a C chord. Colouring it by adding the 6th (A) or major 7th (B) is harmonically neutral. The minor 7th (Bb) turns it ...


2

Taking your theory further, you could , while on that E melody note, play a G# as well. Now it stops sounding so good! The E melody note is contained, as Dom says, within the C maj chord. Playing an Emaj. chord wouldn't (usually) work as the G# is not in the Cmaj. set of notes - it's not diatonic. The B sometimes works, as it makes a Cmaj.7 chord, and of ...


1

The notes of a C major chord are C, E, and G. To fill out the chord if the melody has a E you could play the missing notes C and G. It's the simplest and most effect way of filling in the rest of the chord. There are other options though that I will explain. If you are playing with others you have a lot more freedom in your voicing and as long as you are ...


5

As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


2

Of course you can. With modern harmonic practice, the underlying harmony can be almost anything you want. Since the melody is related to a minor, this could be relatively simple. If you previously were on an E7 chord and are going to a d minor chord, then you could put an a minor under this melody. Harmonies, though, occur in context. From the three notes ...


1

If you mean the setting of the word "corporis" in the last bar, that's an English cadence, and it was fairly common in English music of the 16th and 17th centuries - Wikipedia uses an example from another Tallis work. The distinguishing feature is that the raised and natural leading tones are used at the same time.


0

First off, let's examine what chords are used in this song. There are many versions of the transcription of this song, most do not have the F#7 and instead have just a F#m which after listening to the song to confirm seems right: F#m A B E D C#7 All the chord besides the B,which can be viewed as borrowed from the parallel major key of F# major, can be ...


0

To answer 2: yes, for any n, if n is even, then half an octave is n/2 divisions. (This is rather boringly obvious, so perhaps I don't understand the question.) I don't understand what you mean by "unique".


0

Two other importantnotes in a given key (which are the basis for main chords) are the 4th and 5th notes of a major scale, being 5 and 7 semitones from the root respectively. Giving the subdominant and the dominant. That puts a tritone right between them, neither one or the other, but too close to sound consonant. Yes, mathematically it could be construed ...


0

To me this just seems obviously to be in F# minor. So: Main riff: i III IV Bridge: VII i VII V7 Then the D and A chords give a D majorish, D lydian kind of sound but it still ends with a VII i cadence so you could maybe argue we're still in F#minor. chorus: VI(I) III(V) VII(II) i(iii) Then the C#7 at the end of the chorus works to take us back squarely ...


2

Yeah I'm going to have nightmares tonight. Definitely A is the root, there's no doubting that. That makes E the dominant, which is why the song has strange E chords before A chords - a "V - I" progression. Upon listening to the melody, it seems to me that the notes in the scale are all natural except for that pesky Bb. This means that the major scale for ...


0

The voicings you wrote are two root position chords, specifically V to I, resolving in parallel. This is the absolute most basic way to "voice" these chords and is generally considered cheesy and un-interesting, mostly because the sounds is boring, or maybe too strong of a resolution for the middle of the piece, maybe ok at the end. It is a very flat, ...


4

The point of avoiding certain parallels is not that it would "sound bad". On the contrary, it sounds really good - so good that for centuries, this was the only kind of polyphony anyone ever used. The point is rather that if you want to write a polyphonic piece of music (and that was a radically, heretically new idea at th time), you'd better not lead your ...


6

It depends on what you are trying to do. If you are using the chords as harmonic colour, parallel triads work fine. If you need some independence between the voices, parallel octaves and fifths aren't so good. Both with and without are perfectly acceptable, and have been since the end of the 19th century, provided you accomplish what you are setting out to ...


-1

A lowered seventh is common. A raised seventh is so completely indistinguishable from an octave as to be pointless! The lowered seventh may flavour the tonic chord as a dominant 7th related to IV. It may just be a flavour, as in the blues I7 IV7 V7 progression. (But if you want to feel some "dominant 7th of F" in the C7, that's fine.) The natural ...



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