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There is a jazz course developed by my teacher Alexander Lavrov. You can get familiar with some his works here. The course is not standard but IMHO of good quality. It explains not only how to analyze music, but how to write your own.


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For jazz theory one of the best books I've ever read is The Chord Scale Theory and Jazz Harmony by B. Nettles and R. Graf. It explains a lot of useful theory with practical examples. If you want to get the most out of it, sit down and play through all the examples, so you can hear what all that theory is actually about.


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A minor 2nd interval (two notes that are one half-step apart) is used in the chord. Minor 2nds generally sound dissonant and not very good. On a piano, try playing B and C or F and F# together. The major seventh chord doesn't sound quite as dissonant as this because the B and C are in different octaves, but it's definitely not as pleasing as a regular ...


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Spacing ("voicing") a chord like that makes the interval between the topmost "seventh" and the melody note a semitone, also called a minor second. A different spacing would change that to a major seventh. Minor seconds sound harsher than major sevenths, because the notes of a minor second usually occupy the same psychoacoustic critical band. That's why, ...


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Even if the b2 interval mentioned in Dan Davis's answer is avoided by using a different voicing, the problem that is usually meant in this context is the b9 interval between the major 7th and the (higher) root note. The b9 interval is considered a very dissonant interval which in traditional jazz harmony is only "allowed" on a dominant seventh chord ...


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It looks like that bit of information has been in the article since it was written. From the original 2005 article: Often the melody note or other pitched phenomena influences which of the above chord types a performer selects. For example, if the melody note is the root of the chord, including a major seventh can frequently cause a harsh dissonance. I ...


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Which brings me to my question, how DO you write successive, non-functional chord progressions like chromatic ascending/descending bass? You write them using pencil and paper, sometimes a computer, sometimes just in your head, sometimes as you play an instrument. I believe your real question is how do you create successive non-functional ...


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The whole purpose of a progression is to move from one harmonic entity to another. If you want to approach this by the non-functioning-harmony-way you would have to look at the building pieces of chords which are the intervals. Every chord you build, even the most wild one, consists of some intervals built upon a fundamental tone. (For example a C major ...


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You obviously know a lot about theory, but always be aware that theory is someone's attempt to explain what has happened. None of this theory has passed into 'law', so it's still 'theoretical'. Before the theories, folks were writing and playing music. It stood or fell on its own merits. O.k. some of it was way before its time, so was not accepted when it ...


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Yes, you can create four-part realizations from a chord sheet (you can even modify some of the chords if you're feeling adventurous). If your actual question is "how do I do that", you'll notice that this question has already been asked here, and has been closed as being too broad. However, if you've never done this before, and you already found a 4-part ...


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It's important to realize that there are two basic flavors of that chord: the first being the "Hendrix chord", which acts as a I chord, i.e. you use an E7/#9 in a song that is in E (like Purple Haze). Here, you can't use an altered 5th, because this would take away the stability necessary for the I chord. You could use a perfect fifth though (but I've never ...


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A #9 chord does not mandate an altered 5th. You can get 13th or a b13 (and #9b13 sounds great with a perfect 5th, you'll generally throw in a #11 with it). For a basic #9 chord, a possible mode is the diminished scale, starting with a half step. You can check that this includes a perfect 5th, a #11 and a 13 (unaltered).


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You have to remember the full chord is an E7#9 meaning that the chord is a E7 with an added #9. The notes of the E7 are standard unless otherwise stated. It is an altered chord because we're adding a #9 which is considered altered tone because we are taking the natural 9 and raising it or altering it to get the sound we want. However just because the 9th is ...


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I've come across this chord quite often, but I've never heard any specific name for it, so I think that there is none. It is usually played as a dominant seventh chord, e.g. in A minor it would be a B7 chord. Some people would analyze it as V7/V (i.e. a secondary dominant for the dominant chord: B7 is the V of E7, which is the V of A minor). In your example ...


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This should be thought of as a root-position seventh chord with a ninth added to it. You wrote: I know it isn't some kind of inversion, since the V9 inversions are indicated differently. In fact, it's even easier than you thought. :) It's not an inversion, it's in root position. Basically, it's almost the same as just writing "7", which is also root ...


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They want you to add the ninth and the seventh of the chord. You can leave out the fifth. It is the least important note of the triad and just add those two notes. Remember the seventh still has to resolve. I'm curious as to why the indications are between the staves. That seems poor to me. I have never seen that before.


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It's figured bass and while typically associated with analysis and chords the meaning typically differs. As you said typically when thinking in chords or analysis in a V9 the 7th is implied. However, in figured bass only the typical triad is implied unless otherwise noted so just putting the 9 would make the harmony add9 instead of dominant 9. So yes it is ...


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A possible explanation would be that the F# in the fourth bar from the end in the counterpoint is sharped so that there is no tritone with the B in the third bar from the end in the cantus firmus. The unaccented D that follows F# in the counterpoint would not alleviate the formation of the tritone.


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R. Descartes: "People would get rid of half of their problems if they could agree on the meaning of words." It seems to me that the infinite discussion about counterpoint and harmony is basically such a case. The matter with counterpoint is clear: it is method of composition, which evolved from chorus singing when such music instruments as organ and ...


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You are right that in minor the minor sixth of the key is part of the II chord, and it is a tension (b9) that is very often used on the V chord. However, it is not a valid tension on the I chord, because the minor sixth is an avoid note on that chord (basically because it is a half step above a basic chord tone, the 5). In this blog post you can read more ...


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You wrote: Do these diminished chords fit in a diatonic scale well, even though they're chromatic? This is not a yes/no question, but rather, the answer is "It depends". If you want your melody to remain purely diatonic, you would probably want to focus on notes that are in the key of C, and that also are members of the chord at hand. For instance, in ...



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