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A couple of examples .. If you compare Marilyn Manson's verison of "Sweet Dreams" with the original Eurythmycs version, you get a quite different feel for the same melody. In The Feeling's "Fill my little world" there's a bit just towards the end where the lead vocal sings "that I'm passing you by" in a completely different style to the rest of the song. ...


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You're very unlikely to find any sort of polyphonic tonal music that has zero parallel motion. The rules of counterpoint proscribe the use of parallel 5ths and octaves, but not any other intervals (4ths are somewhat frowned upon), so avoiding parallel motion entirely wouldn't be an intent on the part of a composer. The reason that 5ths and 8ths are ...


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I assume you mean harmonies which follow each other (ie, the harmony note goes up & down with the lead vocal) ? (ie not literally parallel .. the interval changes as the notes move about). If so .. Simon and Garfunkel's 'The sound of silence' has a great line - the one which goes "People talking without speaking" - One voice is singing a melody while ...


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Well, yes, when listening to pop and rock music, it can seem like much of the vocal harmonisation moves in parallel motion (often in thirds and sixths), but there are plenty of examples of different motion out there, if you listen out for them. I've always thought that The Beatles used some subtly interesting vocal harmonies. Below are the first 8 bars of ...


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If you're looking for complete absence of parallel motion, I guess that would be very rare. But if you're looking for examples that have substantial amount of oblique and contrary motion, or "echo" effects, then there are examples: Mamas & the Papas, California dreaming: ...


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Such thematic variation happens in most movies produced in the past fifty years. Just choose one that you like, turn off the distracting video, and listen. Darth Vader's theme changes every time. (This trick comes from film theorist Michel Chion.) Of course, the granddaddy is Richard Wagner's four-opera cycle The Ring of the Nibelung: fourteen hours of ...


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The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


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I'm not an expert on the terminology, but I just think of that as the 4-semitone key change. It mimicks the chord progression (Am,F) but it has 2 minors, so its kind of like a "dark" version of (Am,F). Also, the 4-semitone change fits with the 5- and 7-semitone changes people use in blues. So its kind of like a "dark" version of the standard blues ...


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Am it is until your stated 3:28 mark.Then it goes into more like E maj. Then about 4:10 ish it modulates back to Am.It doesn't have to have a lot to do with the original key.Although the new key of E is the dominant of Am.This E maj spawns the relative minor of C#m, so that's where that comes in. A song, say, in C can modulate (change key) up to C#. None of ...


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It seems to me that the C#m chord is a flavoured substitution for the C+ (C augmented) chord that is built from A harmonic/melodic minor. The notes in C#m are as follows: C# E G# The notes in C+ are as follows: C E G# Because there is only one note difference this substitution is easily achieved. Another thing to notice is that there is a C in ...


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What I have learned from composition and music history, is that regardless of the intellectual aesthetic, what matters when you get to the double bar is what sounds the best. Composers do not write squiggles down and figure out sounds to fit those squiggles, patting themselves on the back about how clever they are. Neither should you either fuss with ...



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