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While music can be very formula driven similar to mathematics the real stuff happens when you go away from the formulas or go put of the box. Flat 7 and Flat 3 notes & chords are very common particularly in blues and jazz. These variations from the norm are what can provide color and character to music. When in doubt go with the words of the great Duke ...


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Check both: mDecks "Mapping Tonal Harmony": mdecks.com/mapharmony.phtml and Cognitone "Harmony Navigator" and "Synfire": cognitone.com/products/index/page.stml Either one or the other will blow off you mind :)


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Just done a trawl through sheet music, to find it's been written with key signatures of C, G and E. The original, which lands on A, has no key sig. Most of the solo work seems to be using E minor pent/blues. It could be construed that it's in E, as that's the chord it gravitates to each verse. Or the chords could be explained (in E) as coming from ...


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There are many ways to deviate from the pattern. In this example a very common pattern emigres from the circle of 5ths. The chords don't belong to any one key, but rather come from multiple keys. You start with a C and go to G (I to V in the key of C), then you go from a G to a D(I to V in the key of G), then you go from a D to a A(I to V in the key of D), ...


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It's difficult to tell which are the passing chords from your example because there's no time values. Passing chords are of short duration and/or occur on off-beats. So absent that, I would look at the chord tones for each to determine what melody to play. F#m: F# A C# ("color tones": E G# B D) F: F A C ("color tones": E G Bb D) Esus2: E B F# Ebm7b5: Eb ...


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It is possible to have multiple keys in a song. Charles Mingus in 'Nostalgia in Times Square' changed 3 keys in as many bars. He used chromatic notes in the melody as well. So, don't try to narrow your progression down to only one possible key. Now, let's say you are in D major: F#m -> 3rd chord of the scale. F -> chromatic. The bass goes F# to F(natural) ...


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Upper structures are tritones over a minor/major triad or the other way round. Forming these chords needs thorough understanding on triads and tritones. A C major7(b5) is an example.C-E-G-B-Gb. there two chords in these...a minor triad nd a tritone/dominant. E-G-B=E minor triad.Also Gb-C=Gb tritone,C tritone and Ab dominant. In remembrance to the fact that a ...


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I want to start my answer by saying: I don't know. This is a very profound question. It does not have a trivial answer. I don't think anyone knows the answer for certain. Because your question isn't just about how Common-Practice Era Western Music Theory Type analysis proceeds. It's about how we think about what a chord is. What is it about how we hear ...


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There is a rather more fundamental, physical reason for this than so far mentioned: the bass fills not only the bass frequency range, but its harmonics actually reach well into the midrange where all other voices have their fundamentals! In fact, since the bass has typically the strongest amplitude1 of all tuned instruments (save perhaps trumpets, lead ...


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This is not a rigorous, scholarly answer, but a useful one: There is a simple, general principle in writing Western music that has been mentioned by many people over the centuries. It basically says that a piece of music has two important components: the melody up top, and the bass line down low. The chords are determined by filling in the spaces between the ...


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A lot of Western music falls into the broad category of primary melody on top, a lot of stuff in the middle, and bass line on bottom. The outside lines--melody and bass--are easiest for our ears to distinguish because they are the lowest and highest boundaries of each vertical slice of harmony. The inner voices are often (but by no means always) less ...


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I see a problem right away in the way you are looking at the analysis. When you analyze something and notate either a chord or a Roman numeral the chord is meant to analyze all notes and pitches up to the next chord/Roman numeral change with the exception of a few non-harmonic tones that are typically notated. Also note you are in the key of C# minor so the ...


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Casey Rule gave a fine answer, I just want to point out a few things about harmonizing in general and you should be aware of while trying to harmonize a bass line. iii chords are quite rare in a major key, in fact in all my classical theory studies I don't remember analyzing anything that used any type of iii chord in a major key. While viiĀ° is a viable ...


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A single bassline can be harmonized in a number of different ways. Assuming you are working only with diatonic triads (three note chords that require no accidentals), you'll typically have three options for your harmony for each note. In the key of G major, those options look like this: G: I, vi6, IV64 A: ii, viiĀ°6, V64 B: iii, I6, vi64 C: IV, ii6, ...


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I like to think of harmony and counterpoint as more of a question of vertical versus horizontal slices of music. If you cut a piece of multi-voice writing into horizontal slices (i.e. the individual melodies of the parts) and look at how those parts fit together, you are approaching it contrapuntally. If you cut it into a sequence of vertical slices (i.e. ...


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I think of counterpoint and harmony as separate things but they are really both happening all of the time. In fact, the only situation where you do not have harmony, you cannot have counterpoint, which is to have a monophonic instrument playing solo. Harmony can be implied in such a setting but it is not actually there. I would argue that parallel motion ...


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Harmony is just multiple notes sounding at the same time. Counterpoint is the technique of creating harmony by interweaving multiple melody lines. So they are not at all mutually exclusive. One is a technique for creating the other. Harmony created by counterpoint could be said to give a more complex or layered sound than other means of harmony. They could ...



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