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I like to think of harmony and counterpoint as more of a question of vertical versus horizontal slices of music. If you cut a piece of multi-voice writing into horizontal slices (i.e. the individual melodies of the parts) and look at how those parts fit together, you are approaching it contrapuntally. If you cut it into a sequence of vertical slices (i.e. ...


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I think of counterpoint and harmony as separate things but they are really both happening all of the time. In fact, the only situation where you do not have harmony, you cannot have counterpoint, which is to have a monophonic instrument playing solo. Harmony can be implied in such a setting but it is not actually there. I would argue that parallel motion ...


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Harmony is just multiple notes sounding at the same time. Counterpoint is the technique of creating harmony by interweaving multiple melody lines. So they are not at all mutually exclusive. One is a technique for creating the other. Harmony created by counterpoint could be said to give a more complex or layered sound than other means of harmony. They could ...


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It depends entirely on the genre, and that is actually one of the defining characteristics of genre. most pop: probably, and mostly. Sometimes augmented by the occasional secondary dominant. Part of why they are so "easy to hear". But if it's torch-songy pop, probably not because they borrow a lot from the style of standards musical theatre or standards or ...


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Write the song with the melody BEFORE you worry about what key it's in. I think you'll only limit yourself (box yourself in) if you try to choose a key first (since it sounds like you've mostly learned by ear up to this point, anyways.) Make the song/tune/piece sound good to you first and then you can figure out what key it's in. I've played with some ...


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I would actually consider this to be ♭III - IV - I in B major, with the ♭III borrowed from the parallel minor key. In fact, with the ♭III chord, it's somewhat similar in character to one of the "Fellowship of the Ring" themes: I - ♭III - I (in your key, that would be Bmaj - Dmaj - Bmaj). It's the first three chords here. Soundtracks aside, this type of ...


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Not all the chords in a chord progression need to be strictly in the key. The best way to look at this chord progression is a ♭VII - I - V in the key of E major. The D major chord is a chord that exists in E mixolydian (on of the other modes of E) and it is very common for someone playing in the key of E major to borrow it. The E major and B major are ...


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Honestly, it could fit in several different keys, including C major, C minor, G major. There's not enough data here to tell for sure. At least one of the chords must be borrowed, though, since there is no single key that contains the E natural (in Am and C) and the E flat (in Cm). In order to define a key, you really need a cadence: a dominant-tonic ...


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Far more often than not, the first full bar of a song contains the key chord. This 'sets the scene' for the listener. and establishes 'home'. In this case, it COULD be in C minor, which then brings the Am into question. This is explained away with the idea of 'parallel key', which gives another set of harmonies to use. As in not only the Cm set - Cm, Fm, ...


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What I think fits perfectly here is that you are on the G major scale and you borrow a chord from the G minor scale. The chords G major and A minor fit perfectly with the scale and C minor is the 4th chord from the G minor scale. You are allowed to do that and it sound pretty good; it is also pretty common. Here is an example where Elvis uses it: ...


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Well, counterpoint is not harmonization. The main difference is that counterpoint has its own melodic and rhythmic identity. If you take a look at, say, Bach's great choral works, you'll find some pieces labelled "Choral" which are mainly a melody with harmonization, and some pieces labelled "Chorus" which are strongly oriented along lines of counterpoint ...


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No; each are separate. Harmony is vertical and treats tones as singular, sonorous entities. Counterpoint is horizontal, and indicates direction. There is harmony in counterpoint, however, it is treated as incidental with the priority being the emphasis of musical line and direction. Each is separate but equal. You could be a master of voice-leading but ...


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Counterpoint is the study of how to make voices (musical lines) independent. It is not simply just harmony. Harmony comes into play, but if you are working on anything tonal harmony will come into play. The common examples of counterpoint is Bach and Fux, but can be seen a lot in modern music. The most common places you would see counterpoint today is in ...


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if you want a general method you can apply behind all the theory this chart works for you.Just choose any chords you want and use them accordingly.


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E7 is the Dominant of A minor. E major is almost correct but, you are missing the minor 7. The major third and the minor 7 of every dominant chord make the interval of a tritone.


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The notes of the dominant chord of a minor is E/G#/B. E - G# is a Major third while E - B is a perfect fifth. This makes the chord Major. I think you are getting confused by what it means for a scale to minor / Major and what it means for a chord to minor / Major. A Major Chord is one with a Major third and a perfect fifth. This can happen in both minor ...


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The point of any dominant chord is to lead back to the tonic chord. The best way to do this is by using the leading tone (Natural 7th in major, raised 7th in minor). Because of how the natural minor scale is formulated, the leading tone is omitted from the scale. This however does not change the fact that the leading tone gives a very strong pull to the ...


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It's probably more often the V because it has that G#. That comes from both the harmonic and the melodic minors. Sometimes Eminor is the V and it is used in lots of songs.Yes, it originates from the natural minor (or in some cases the melodic). It isn't so decisive, but still pushes towards I, which is the job of any V chord.


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When people refer to a “minor scale”, they don’t always think of the natural minor scale. Quite often, they think of the harmonic minor scale, which is similar to the natural scale with the seventh degree raised by a semitone. As the seventh degree is the third of the dominant chord, the dominant chord is major in harmonic minor scales. For example, the A ...


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Yes it is the dominant chord. The third is sharpened to G# to make a major chord, which gives a stronger cadence when moving V-i. This is why the Harmonic Minor has a sharpened seventh degree, to create the sharpened third in the dominant chord (or leading note in the scale, whichever way you want to think about it). In common-practice harmony, the strong, ...


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It is correct to a certain extent. You are absolutely right that the 'natural' A minor scale has no sharps in it, and the v chord would be an E minor. However, minor scales come in several 'flavors'. There is the natural minor, harmonic minor, and melodic minor. The harmonic minor is the same as the minor scale with the 7th raised by a semi-tone. Ergo, ...


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@Dom answered this from the perspective of harmony, so I thought I'd complement that with an explanation about melody. There is an old theory of melody (maybe it was in Fux' Gradus ad Parnassum? Don't have time to check) that a melody starts "at rest", then "moves", then "returns to rest". This pattern is generally found on at the level of the musical ...


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If you were in C (ie it wasn't a key mixup as noted above), D Maj would be a Major II chord, which could be considered to be a secondary dominant of V. (D is the V of G). This would normally be seen more commonly as II7 with a C natural on top, but if you were playing only triadic harmony, it might be a simple D triad. It's commonmore in standards (ie ...


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As MartinK said, this alternative is simply the same chord sequence, modulated to another key. What I'd still like to say: even in a given key, it may be possible to use notes which aren't in the key's standard scale. For instance, it's possible to substitute a D chord in another way into the original sequence: C G D7/F♯ F That would sound quite ...


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You are missing the fact that you are looking at two different keys. The chord progression (C G Am F) is in the key of C. The chord progression (G D Em C) is in the key of G, which contains F#. The first site you were looking at, shows you alternatives for a C major chord in different keys than C. (Maybe compare the third alternative when you are ...


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Recognizing intervals is the vertical method. That's when you hear a chord and pick out the root, 3rd, 5th, 7th, etc. It's useful, but you should also do ear training with the horizontal method. Often this is easier. You pick any note that's being sung or is part of the chord, and you "follow" it across several measures, going up or down only a step or two. ...


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It could be construed as Db7b13 (or C#7b13). The 5 is missing, but it often is in more complex chords, and would clash with the b13 if left in. That chord would be Db, F, (Ab), Cb, no 9th or 11th, but they don't HAVE to appear in 13 chords,and it's not strictly a 13 chord anyway - just a dom 7 with a b13; and Bbb.I'm going for Db rather than C# as the key is ...



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