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1

C and Dm are both diatonic chords in C major. That is not dissonant. That consists of the notes C D E F G and A. That is what you might call a cluster. What you are experiencing is not some kind of auditory illusion; It is a physical phenomena. Beat frequencies are real things. They occur when two tones (or harmonics of tones) interact. If they are ...


0

A triad is the simplest type of chord (The AB Guild to Music Theory) The three notes of a triad can be arranged in two different ways : in close and in open position. In other arrangements, they are called 'chords'.


0

5ths are melodic or harmonic intervals--distances between pitches. When referred to casually, it is assumed to be a perfect fifth. They are the most consonant interval after the octave, and are not particular to "Romantic" music. For more on their importance in the context of harmony, refer here. Clair de Lune is not an example of Debussy's use of fifths. ...


2

A fifth is an interval which is probably the most common in music. It is essentially a note 4 letter names away from a lower note. As in C>G, or E>B. The most common is the perfect fifth, found in both major and minor keys. Harmonics, which are included within most sounds heard when produced on musical instruments, contain the 5th as the initial harmonic. ...


2

The resolution to vi (E7 => Am in the key of C) is the most obvious one. It represents a tonicization of the relative minor key (A minor in the key of C). A very common alternative would be the resolution to IV, as pointed out by you and in ttw's answer. This is a deceptive cadence, where a dominant seventh chord does not resolve to its related tonic chord, ...


0

V7 of vi resolves nicely to vi or vi7 or VI or VI7 or your suggestion of iv or IV.


1

Richard and Dom give a good explanation of why not, so I'll just give a proof by demonstrating a specific counter example, which you may find interesting: Telemann's Canonic Sonatas. These are strictly imitative canons, so the second voice plays a time-delayed repetition of the first. If you consider a melody that contains the phrases A-B-C, then when the ...


1

No for two very important reasons. The first and most important being harmony is a subjective subject. There's no guarantee if you like how lines A and B sound that anyone else will. How good something sounds is in the ears of the beholder. The second is from a counterpoint perspective of harmony. How lines A, B, and C interact is completely independent of ...


2

Interesting way of framing this question! The answer, alas, is a resounding no. Imagine you have a C in Line A. Cool. Now imagine you have an E in Line B. This makes a great major third (a consonance) between Lines A and B. Perfect. Now forget about Line A and imagine you have a B in Line C. Between Lines B and C, you have a perfect fifth. Perfect again (...


1

I know it's an old discussion, but I thought I might add my five cents: I'm working on the "Gradus" these days (Mann's translation) and have asked myself the same question. Then I remembered that in footnote 9 to Chapter one Mann says that "the tritone is to be avoided even when reached stepwise (f-g-a-b) IF THE LINE IS NOT CONTINUED STEPWISE AND IN THE ...


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This is probably a rephrase of other comments but I have my own interpretation of CPP usage of minor keys. There is one minor key (the idea of natural, harmonic, and melodic minors as separate entities isn't all that important in CPP music.) The 6th and 7th step of the minor scale are mutable. Either or both may be raised and still be considered diatonic; ...


1

Harmony in general is a pretty broad topic and there isn't just one option for how to do harmony. In general, harmony is the simultaneous or "vertical" relation between what is being played. There is the typical Western idea of functional harmony where the Tonic-Dominant relationship (I-V) drives the progressions we encounter, but there is a lot more out ...


0

Let's take a step back and just get a grasp of what is being shown here. The notes on the staff represent the melody and the Roman numerals represent the harmony. The Roman Numeral in the harmony is valid until another Roman Numeral replaces it so yes the harmony is an I which is an F major chord throughout the first measure. The melody and the harmony are ...


1

When you write the roman numeral denomination of the chords, you are implying that the notes that make up each chord are present, although not explicitly written in the score. So "I" in your example means that the notes F-A-C would be in some fashion played in an improvised manner by a performer or arranged or orchestrated by the composer for the orchestra ...


7

I don't know of any published studies on this, but the basic cause is well known, and it is a fundamental limitation on the quality of sound reproduction. When you pan the two chords hard left and right, your two loudspeakers (or earphones) are acting as two independent (monophonic) sound sources. Human hearing is very good at locating the position of ...


3

First of all congrats to the OP for an intriguing and innovative idea. I don't know of any specific studies about this subject either, but I think that the reason why the two chords don't sound dissonant when separated left and right is the same as when they are separated by an octave, and the reason why (traditionally) we have 9th, 11th chords and not 2nd,...



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