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As a guitarist, you will be aware that at any given moment, a chord fits under what is being sung. The melody line may contain several notes, but for starters, if you sing one of the notes from that chord, it'll fit the melody line, just as the rest of the notes from that chord will. Basically, there will be a root, 3 and 5 in that chord, so initially, get ...


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The human ability to feel melody has the same nature as ability to feel the speech intonation. The physiological experiments proved that contour of speech intonation is determined by current most perceiving frequency component in the diapason roughly 100-500 Hz. In the same time the summary diapason of bass and treble staves in which a melody is depicted ...


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As tempting as it would be to apply a chord-based mentality to Bach's music, fundamentally its the opposite of whats going on, and I think you're missing out on the beauty of what he's doing and how it can benefit you. Bach, and many other great composers, approach composition horizontally via voice leading, rather to vertically (aka with 'chords'). By ...


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I'm not familiar with Dvorak's Humoresque, but assuming he wanted a section in the parallel minor (i.e. G♭ minor), then a 9-flat key signature would certainly be awkward. F♯ minor is certainly warranted here. A number of years ago I read a review of Gustav Mahler's 9th Symphony, where the reviewer mentioned the first movement "...alternated between D ...


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The opening section of Spanish Dance No 3, by Granados, I think provides a clear example of non-contrapuntal music. Notice how each of the different voices move in the same contour and the same rhythm. It's probably my least favourite of the 12 dances, but it's one you never forget because it is so rigid.


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Counterpoint is the relationship between voices that are harmonically dependent, yet are independent in other aspects like in rhythm and shape. Counterpoint is only really observed in pieces that have multiple independent melodies or in other words polyphonic in nature. The example you are talking about is homophonic or consists of a distinct melody and ...


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I don't know of any clear-cut fully worked out published approach, but there is a lot of research out there. Here are some pointers. David Temperley's is a leading researched in this field and his paper An Algorithm for Harmonic Analysis his the most in depth approach I've seen so far (although very heavy on the music theory side). His book The Cognition of ...


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http://www.cstreetbrass.com/ 2 trumpets; http://www.mnozilbrass.at/en/ 3 trumpets You're really only limited by the arrangements.. and even then you could easily double on parts.


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To me his style is all about effect. The linear melody and contrapunctal lines keep the music together, and harmonically he is going out as far as possible, but still to my ears with always having a tonal center. The use of chromaticism helps him "mask" the harmony and letting him go out to unexpected chords.


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The melody may be louder, or mixed 'drier' might be a distinct 'voice' type (e.g. male 'main' singer with 3 female backing singers) often changes note more often, while harmony notes may tend to change more 'with the chord' may be more inflected and ornamented may be freer in time, with the harmony following the beat more closely may be easier to follow ...


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It's called the English cadence. It combines 7 and ♭7 simultaneously, and was used up to roughly Purcell's time in the UK. You can find an example at the end of Thomas Tallis's Spem in allum. Here's another example from Tallis (O sacrum convivium):


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https://wmich.edu/musicgradexamprep/NonChordTones.pdf I think that 3 sources can help to clear up this question, that is H Helmholz, J.Rameau and fake-books in which You ought to analyze only acknowledged works. H. Helmholtz explained dissonances by interaction of chord's partials with near frequencies. Long before Helmholtz didn't dispose by this ...


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Before I answer your question, I think it will be helpful to explain "harmony". The melody of the song is conveyed via single notes. We often refer to chords that are played with the melody notes as the "harmony" part of the song. Dictionary.com has the following for the definition of "harmony": the simultaneous combination of tones, especially when ...


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Working from your example: C and F are both part of the F major chord, so you can hold one F major chord for both of those notes. G and D are both part of the G major chord, so you could just hold a G major chord for both notes. So you would have F major, then G major. Another way to do it: F and D are both part of a D minor chord, so you could hold D ...


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There is (at least) one chord in Common Practice Period harmony that has the same interval-pattern as a dominant seventh that behaves differently, the German Sixth. It's normally written differently (Ab-C-Eb-F# in C rather than Ab-C-Eb-Gb) but it's possible to play enharmonic games with the chord. Whether a chord is a dominant seventh is more accurately ...


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A secondary dominant is used to tonicize the chord you are moving to, ie, to make the chord of resolution feel like the I/i chord. This is accomplished through creating a dominant chord a fifth above the chord of resolution; the old V-I(i) resolution. In the vast majority of situations, this action requires altering a/some scale degree(s). This is ...


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A secondary dominant won't have all its notes from the original key anyway. Take the secondary dominant from C major. Dominant is G, with all notes belonging to C, but the secondary dominant is D7, with an F#. So, your case - dominant of Dm is A7 ( or if you wanted, Am7), and its dominant will be E7 (or maybe Em7), making the secondary dominant.Generally, ...


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You would get an A7 chord, because you would build the secondary dominant chord based on the harmonic minor scale. The point of a secondary dominant chord is to make the chord you are basing it off feel like tonic, and this would be achieved by using the harmonic minor scale. This site would probably be helpful to better understanding ...


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"Sonority" just means "sound". Musicians may use the word in different ways in different contexts. But it generally boils down to just meaning "sound".



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