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5

Although much of the harmony here is triadic, few of the chords function in a conventional way. It is possible to give each chord a "name"; for instance, the first 13 bars could be notated as these chords (with a little enharmonic licence): Em / / / | B7sus4 / B7 / | B7b5 / Bm7b5 Dm7b5 | E7 / Em7 Edim7 | Am7 / F#m7b5 ?? | F#m7b5 / D#dim7 ?? | D7 / / / | ...


6

The term for chord connections like this, where each note of the chords changes (usually chromatically, almost always step-wise) one-by-one, is linear harmony. It's quite common in Liszt, Scubert, Schumann, etc. Roman numeral analysis is mostly pointless during linear harmony passages, most analysts will either just label it as linear harmony until the next ...


5

A similar discussions ensued on Using the Dorian Mode In brief, as you shift to other modes with the same tonic—e.g. move from C Major(Ionian) to C Lydian)—the chord families can often be used in the same way despite their changes of quality. The nature of the pressure for resolution might change, and to be sure the sound of the progression will change, but ...


0

No.For example, in Cmaj., the G is dominant, so pushes towards the tonic, C. When you play in, say, Aeolian, the tonic isn't C any more, it's A. So the original dominant, G, doesn't have that same push, as the gravitational pull needs to be towards A. So, as the dominant of A is E, that becomes the new dominant. However, in minor, the dominant is not so ...


8

Harmony refers to the "vertical" relationship between simultaneous pitches in a musical texture (usually, but not always, chords - see below for the exception). However, it also refers to the "horizontal" relationships between successive vertical relationships of pitches; it's probably easiest to think of these as chord progressions. The exception, mentioned ...


6

Harmony supports the melody. Polyphony is when there is more than one independent melody. The basic idea is that in polyphony is that each melody can stand on its own independent of the other melody. Common examples of this are rounds, fuges, and counterpoint. In the case of harmony, everything supports the melody. Their may be secondary melodies or the ...


2

Like many pieces of classical music, this theme features the movable scale degrees 6 and 7 of the minor mode, which can be either major or minor without leaving the key. What makes this theme especially freaky is that, instead of using B-natural in ascending motion toward the tonic (as is typical for melodic minor), this melody repeatedly employs unusual ...


3

In Bach's time, the cadential six-four chord was treated as an appoggiatura grouping; the root and third had to resolve downward and therefore were never doubled. This rule was followed by most composers of chorales for some time thereafter and thus is included in all introductory harmony texts. By Mozart's time, the cadential six-four was established as an ...


0

Changing the doubling of IV6 will not help, as the issue concerns the progression of the root, which must appear in at least one inner voice. The doubling is definitely the lowest-priority rule, so 4 should proceed to 2, possibly jumping up to 5 if necessary to connect to the next harmony. (Taking advantage of the fact that the original asker did not specify ...


4

It depends on how many different chords there are in the song. For jazz, the traditions of chord substitution, use of ii-V progressions, possible polytonality and shifting key centers may mean you have to look at a dozen chords and grok the chord movement to understand the key. But for the overwhelming majority of songs you only need one chord, the final ...


-4

95% of the time the first chord will tell you what key the song is in


9

There isn't any hard and fast rule. The first thing is that the key signature narrows it down to two keys. So, for example, if there are no sharps or flats in the key signature, the key is either C major or A minor. Most of the time, the first few measures in the piece will establish whether you're in the major or minor key. Beethoven's 5th symphony is a ...


3

Chords, I'd say two. One will be the tonic, and the other, usually, the dominant. There are songs that use tonic and sub-dominant, which, funnily enough, is the same relationship, but the other way round.Given a minor key, the dominant may well be major, so it's easier to determine.Obviously, the more the merrier.Working through a song, three could be enough ...


5

As the other answers have said, a secondary dominant is a 7th chord that resolves to a chord other than the tonic. The classic example is a D7 chord in the key of C: the D7 resolves to G, which itself resolves to C. Dominants create tension To understand the theory and practice behind secondary dominants, you have to understand that all dominant chords ...


3

Theory Secondary Dominants are chords that are the Dominant (V) chord of a certain key other than the Tonic (I) key. For example, let the current key be C Major. An F Major chord is the Subdominant (IV) of the current key (C Major). How about a C Dominant 7th chord? That is not in the current key, but you know it's the Dominant 7th (V7) of F Major, and F ...


11

In common-practice theory, secondary dominant chords are chromatic harmonies used to approach a non-tonic chord with greater urgency. Let's use C major for examples: I might want to approach the V chord (G) with a secondary dominant to give greater direction or "color" to the approach. I construct the secondary dominant by going to the V chord of the V ...


2

A secondary dominant chord is when you turn a minor or major 7th chord into a dominant chord, in order to make another chord the tonic chord. I can't tell you exactly what's the theory behind this, but I can tell you a bit about how they're used, not so much for composition but for arrangements: Take for example a typical chord progression I-VI-II-V. If we ...


4

First of all, the clefs are not quite right and the bottom part should be an octave lower (this is inferrable from the illegal 4th in the penultimate bar). Modes in Renaissance style are not the strict collections of 7 notes used in "modal" pop and jazz songs. Instead, a mode tells us where the tonic is located within a field of 11 notes, 7 diatonic and ...


1

Look up "Coltrane changes" in wikipedia.org. Essentially, they consist of a minor third interval followed by a perfect fourth interval (e.g. B-D-G-Bflat, etc.). Coltrane's compositions "Giant Steps" and "Countdown" are good examples, as well as his changes on the bridge of his recording of the standard "Body and Soul". The wikipedia article explains this ...


4

A lot of things come into play here. Often, the harmonies are analyzed (using Roman Numerals if it's Common Practice Tonality, using something like set theory if it's post-tonal, etc.) in order to see where the composer has followed standard progressions and, more interestingly, when they haven't. We look at the specific voicings of the harmonies and see how ...



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