Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

The 'original' version appears to be in Cmaj. Chords for verse being G and F. Thus V-IV, going to I. This puts the solo into F#m with B maj.,ending back on the G, straight into the next verse.The solo is using the blues scale of F#m, which could translate as F# Dorian or key of E. There's no V chord that's found usually in a modulation, either into or out ...


1

In short, it's a way of approaching scales based on regular divisions of one or more octaves. Schillinger used the term symmetric scale to describe a set of notes increasing by the same interval. These include: the chromatic scale (each note on a piano) the whole-tone scale (a whole step between neighbor notes, 6 notes per octave) the notes of the ...


4

You can't really apply these functional terms to modes. A mode refers to a specific scale and its characteristic melodic phrases. The problem with Phrygian, when you try to build classical harmony on its scale, is in fact constructing the "dominant" harmony, i.e. the triad on the 5. step. It has a diminished fifth (in "White Key Phrygian" on E this would be ...


1

4-tonic system means that a piece of music emphasizes four notes, usually equal intervals apart (in other words a diminished 7th), as its tonic centers. The chords and melodies generally related to those four tonal centers. Coltrane's Giant Steps is a popular example of 3-tonic, leaping amid G, B, and Eb. These don't have to be equal divisions of the ...


0

There may be some good ideas to be found in the answers to this related question: How do I learn to detect chord voicing by ear?


0

Beatles harmonies are a little difficult to figure out because Paul and John used a lot of diminished 7ths and 5ths and were quite unconventional. Not to mention that they would usually harmonize down scale (using lower notes than the main voice) instead of up scale (using higher notes than the main voice) as is most common. I would suggest starting with ...


1

A good start point will be thirds. A lot of the more simple harmony is sung this way. Think Everly Brothers, or Beatles All My Lovin'. The basic tune is sung, and the harmony is a third on top. Consider the scale - we'll stick to C maj. Going up the scale, if a C note is sung, a third above it will sound good, thus, E. Next, D, and a third above is F. Then ...


7

I'm sure someone more experienced will come to help, but for now, here are some suggestions: Make use of dissonant chords. In particular, augumented fifths, and diminished major sevenths. In particular I'd just look into the various scale modes (e.g. Lydian) and pick out chords from there. If it's a slow horror song I'd suggest using a Dorian mode for ...


1

E flat major. That is the key that the passage resolves to, as you can hear by playing an E flat major chord after the B flat chord. If you follow the B flat with any of the other chords, the passage is left sounding unresolved. Hence, the chord progression is ii,flattened VII, I, V


2

To the existing answers, I'll add that it isn't only enharmonic notes which have this issue of different functions. Let's say you're in the key of C, and you want to play an 'A'. That A could function as (among other possibilities) the root of an A minor chord (a minor 3rd below C), the third of an F major chord (a major 3rd above a perfect 4th above C), or ...


10

The primary answer to your question is that although pitch defines the basic frequency of the note, there is—at least in common-practice tonal music, and many other styles too—an entire other trait called function. A C# and a Db are the same pitch (at least on the piano, these will often have slightly different tunings when played by unfretted string ...


0

They may sound the same, but when written down on the staves, they take on different personas.If one has any education in music, one will expect the appropriate note to be written. As in, when in the key of, say E major/ C#minor, one would expect a C#, not a Db, which just doesn't feature in that key. Likewise, in say, Db, one wouldn't expect a C# note to ...


0

Here is a very simple example of how those two notes are different. In any key, you would have 7 notes one of each letter. If you are in the key of D major, you would have notes D, E, F#, G, A, B, and C#. It would not make any sense to call the last note a Db because you already have a D in your scale as the root. Another example is that chords are ...


7

On many non-keyboard instruments performers will play slightly different notes; these slight differences reflect/determine how these notes behave in a given harmonic and melodic context. In at least some cases, these differences are related to (approximations of) just intonation; in other cases there are ideas of expressive intonation, which again result ...


5

It is unlikely that this is Ab major because the progression doesn't have an Ab major in it and also doesn't typically have a Bb chord. If it has a Bb chord it is usually followed by a Eb chord. I see it as a progression in F minor as a i VI VII IV. The IV is technically not from F minor, but could have easily been taken from the relative major. Another ...


7

First of all, I think it's important to keep in mind that harmony is written for something. I'm going to follow the sort of academic rules of part-writing in my answer, but if this were for "real life" purposes, it would be worth subjecting a lot of those assumptions to the test of what makes the best music (and the most idiomatic music for whatever you're ...


3

Of the 12 major keys, F#/Gb is the only one that can be reasonably notated in two ways, since Cb and C# are far more awkward than B and Db. Both F# and Gb are in common use, but Gb is rather more common. Why? If the music sticks to the diatonic major scale (as this piece largely does), then both keys are equally complicated, but major-key music often ...


0

in 4/4 time, the first and third beats establish the harmony. On these beats, the tone or tones you play must be a fundamental part of the chord you want: typically the 3rd, 5th, or 7th The study of harmony is the study of a how a "tonal center" is established. There are two different types of tonal centers: the "key of the moment" (the key that the current ...


1

Basic resolution comes from a "home/away from home" feeling. You'll find this a lot in the V-I resolution or more strongly in the V7-I resolution (for an extra 50 geek points, check out how the 3rd and 7th of the V7 chord [which form the very dissonant tritone] lead back to the Root and 3rd of the I chord - look for minimal movement! Think half steps). There ...



Top 50 recent answers are included