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2

The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine has some of what you are looking for.


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It's just to let you know the when building the chord you don't use the 5th that is natural to the key, but a lowered one instead. Remember every figured bass marking assumes you are building your harmony inside the key you are in and in this case you are not. So the figured base is referring to Eb instead of E as that is what a standard 5 would represent. ...


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It refers to an interval of a fifth. The b is for you to know that the note should be flat by the key signature. Don't think these symbols as chord symbols. Think of them as intervals regardless of quality (i.e. major, minor, perfect etc.) from the bass note. If an accidental is required it will be given as in your case. The same goes for every other ...


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Short answer: In counterpoint, the harmony is created through melodies played simultaneously by different voices. Long answer: In a modern song, you'll probably find a single melody line played over a guitar strumming the appropriate chords for the harmony. When this is the case, the harmony and melody are broken into two separate functions. One person is ...


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One of the first things to observe is that the tritone F#-C should be avoided, because it suggests a dominant sound (leading to G). Consequently, don't use the II7 chord (D7 in the case of C lydian), and don't use IVm7(b5) (F#m7(b5) in C lydian) either, because both contain the tritone. Note that the triad II (D major triad) can be used. Progressions in ...


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I want to point out a few things: First of all, as others have mentioned, the tritone is symmetric. What this means is that if you take a tritone, and transpose it up or down by a tritone (6 half steps) the result is the same as the interval that you started with (assuming enharmonic equivalence). As a result of the above, moving a tritone up or down by 1 ...


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It's because of beauty of symmetry (and asymmetry) of musical scale. (WARNING: some math ahead) Take a C major scale, and write it down the intervals between each note in number. So a halftone is 1, whole tone is 2 because it's two times the halftone. C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 ...


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As mentioned by Raskolnikov it is indeed just the circle of fifths and nothing else. If you have no sharps and no flats, and you add one sharp, you can say you go from C major to G major. You can also say you go from A minor to E minor. Equivalently, you go from D dorian to A dorian, or from D dorian to D mixolydian, or from A aeolian to A dorian, etc.etc. ...


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You should really consider obtaining the services of an experiences theory teacher. This things take a long while to master. 7 - 10 seems like your general theory questions you would need to know to gain access to a college music program. 7) Also sometimes called the completion of a melody. You are a given a two bar excerpt and asked to write a melody in ...


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This may not be what you really want - but one of the standard textbooks for really understanding this stuff is "tonal harmony" by Kostka


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Any chord built from a dominant triad can function like a V7. (Ex. 1 for an incomplete list) Diminished chords, both diminished triads and sevenths, can act as dominants with the root truncated. (Ex. 2) Semi-diminished sevenths (Tristan chords) are generally used as pre-dominants, but can stand in for V M9 with the root truncated. (Ex. 2c) Augmented sixth ...


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There are only a few chords that really function as a V, i.e. that have a dominant function. Other answers interpreted your question more like "which chords can lead to the I chord", which is actually a different question, because you don't need a chord functioning as a dominant to get back to the I chord (e.g., plagal cadence). These are the chords that ...


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All chords whose root is V or VII are considered dominant chords, and are interchangeable: V major triad, dominant 7, minor and major dominant 9th (minor 9th in a major scale is common. Major 9th in a minor scale is rare), +11 and 13th. For the VII: diminished triad, diminished 7th, semi-diminished 7th (rare in minor scale). Some of these work as altered ...


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A couple I use instead of V (or V7) - in C - B D F Ab and C D F Ab. The first is Bo, the second Fm6. Bo resolves the B to C and the Ab to G, whereas the Fm6 seems to suspend things before resolving to Cmaj. There's also G+, which is different from G7, with its augmented 5th, leading up to the major 3 of the tonic. Another that works in certain places is B ...


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One chord which will easily substitute is vii; for the key of C major, this will be the diminished triad B-D-F. V7 would be G7, i.e. G-B-D-F, so the only difference is that V7 has the dominant in the bass whereas vii is lacking this note. There is also the 'deceptive cadence', which in C would be C#major (or C#7). This works better in minor keys.


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Hi I started a year ago and was really disappointed with the very poor approach to theory that I found. I got on the internet and watched heaps , lots rocky but some really ace https://www.youtube.com/user/musictheoryguy is a brilliant teacher whose videos are short - anything over 10 minutes probably covers too much when starting. I combined this with Bill ...


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There is a jazz course developed by my teacher Alexander Lavrov. You can get familiar with some his works here. The course is not standard but IMHO of good quality. It explains not only how to analyze music, but how to write your own.


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For jazz theory one of the best books I've ever read is The Chord Scale Theory and Jazz Harmony by B. Nettles and R. Graf. It explains a lot of useful theory with practical examples. If you want to get the most out of it, sit down and play through all the examples, so you can hear what all that theory is actually about.


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A minor 2nd interval (two notes that are one half-step apart) is used in the chord. Minor 2nds generally sound dissonant and not very good. On a piano, try playing B and C or F and F# together. The major seventh chord doesn't sound quite as dissonant as this because the B and C are in different octaves, but it's definitely not as pleasing as a regular ...



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