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1

As others have suggested, a tritone substitution is probably the best way to look at it. As an additional point of interest, it could also be seen as a form of Augmented Sixth chord on the b2 scale degree. The Db and B form the interval of an augmented sixth, and adding the F makes it an Italian augmented sixth. The French and German aug6th chords would ...


1

It is indeed a tritone sub of V. I hear it as a G9(b5) with the root (G) replaced by the b5 (Db). So as a chord with root Db it is a Db7/#5, as already pointed out in the other answers. Since it is a tritone sub I wouldn't look at it as "borrowed" from some other mode. Possible scales to play over it are the whole tone scale (of course the one including a G ...


1

This chord could be named Db7(5+)/B (Db7(5+) with B in the bass). It is a substitute dominant chord (a tritone away from G7, and sharing a tritone with G7 -- that is, F <-> B), altered in its fifth degree, and played in the third inversion (the 7th degree is used in the bass). Its best enharmonic spelling is B-Db-F-A, as Db and A are made to explicitly be ...


5

It's not really in the key but you could call it a Db7#5 since the notes you have can be arranged as Db, F, A, and Cb. It is the simplest name and you could look at it as an altered chord borrowed from the Phrygian mode thus fitting in with resolving to C.


3

You have to look at what you have and look at where you are going. Like you said, the A does not naturally exist in C major, however, I think it would be a stretch to say it borrowed from A major since there is such a big jump to the parallel major of the relative minor key especially since the Em doesn't make A seem like a temporary tonic and neither G7 nor ...


1

0, 4, 7 in Integer form is equivalent to P1, M3, P5 in interval form. If you start on a note with MAJOR chord quality in your scale, it will be a primary triad. If you don't it's considered secondary (or auxillary). C Major Scale (UPPER = MAJOR / lower = minor) C d e F G a b C Has primary triads of C - e - G, F - a - C and G - b - d and ...


2

As the others have already given good explanations, here's a beautiful fingerpicking tune which gives a good impression of how this sounds in practice: (not really "jazz" though) This ...


3

Tritone substitution is the substitution of one chord (almost always a dominant 7th of some sort) for one with a root a tritone away. For instance, you could substitute Db7 for G7 because Db is a tritone away from G. This works because the important notes in the chord that determine what it leads to (the third and seventh) are the same in both chords - in ...


9

Tritone substitution is as it says. The substitution of one chord for another, that is a tritone away from the one being substituted. Thus a V7-I ( G7 - C ) becomes Db7 - C. Because the Db is a tritone, or 3 tones away from the G. Exactly half way, as it happens. G7 is spelled G,B,D and F. Db7 is Db,F,Ab and Cb. The two common notes of F and B (Cb), being a ...


0

I recomend that you read Vince Persichetti's Twentieth-Century Harmony: Creative Aspects and Practice. The basic idea is that you want to highlight the distinguishing characteristics of a scale when harmonizing it — but the book is an easy and worth-while read. Like asking how to harmonize a major or minor scale, there answer is endlessly nuanced and ...


1

I believe such a tool would first have to know how to determine what the un-noisy signal sounded like. I don't know of a tool that will do all of this together, but you might be able to cobble together a rudimentary version of such a tool from existing tools. I don't know how well it would work... For example, Reaper (and probably most DAWs) has a ...


4

I wasn't clear what your question really was to be honest, but I think you were asking how you create such colourful sounding chords, so I've added that question and I'll try to answer it a little bit here. There are 3 aspects I'd like to talk about, but they both stem from a similar concept of dissonant. When you hear a single tone, what your ear is ...


0

The song is in E major and the chord you're wondering about is a G#7 resolving to C#m. The G#7 is a secondary dominant chord which creates tension that is resolved by the C#m chord (the VI chord of E major). Note that the G#7 is the V of C#m (that's why it's called a secondary dominant).


0

To me, this sounds like an Ab7. I started from the break at 1:02. I heard these chords: B7 E B7 Ab7. Cheers!



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