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7

Two possible reasons spring to mind. I'm assuming your regular amp setup will be summing the reverb to mono. Some stereo reverbs create phase-discrepancies which appear to push the stereo field wider, which leads to these possibilities... headphones introduce a very artificial stereo field, where the sound sources are 180˚ from each other, with no ...


7

Having faced this issue some times, the best reccomendation i can give you is first of all, listen to your recordings in various systems, the more, the best, because if you want the world to listen to it, you can never test every system in the world, so, try as many as you can and try to balance for the best in all the systems. Particularly, one of the best ...


6

Jam Hub is your saviour !It's an all in one piece of gear with inputs,mixer and headphone facility to do exactly what you need.With a different mix for each member, if needed.


6

For use with a piano I don't think it's particularly necessary to have good headphones. You want ones that can handle a good range of volume without the clarity being greatly affected, so you'd best avoid tinny little earbuds, but other than that you should be OK. One possible exception is if you're playing pieces that go extremely low on the keyboard; A0 ...


5

What I would suggest is to use an Apogee Jam to plug the guitar into the laptop, where it can then use Amplitube to model the sound of a guitar. Then just play a backing track on the laptop, and listen with headphones. There are some disadvantages to this approach but it has been fairly convenient and produces a reasonably good result. You can also ...


4

Just mixing with headphones as recommended in a comment, is a bit risky, since the sound differs quite a lot from what you get with a couple of speakers. Some kind of monitors are definitely recommended. A good pair of monitors is obviously preferable, but the important thing is to know your monitors well. If you have a pair of imperfect monitors, but you ...


4

It's most likely, with equipment made later than 1990 (and that's being pessimistic), that it doesn't matter at all. If you really want to be cautious, just take care with power amps connected to big loudspeakers. Turn these on last, but before beginning to play music. Turn the volume down to start, then bring it up to the level you need. This protects the ...


3

If you have a "line-in" input on your laptop, I have three suggestions: The quick and dirty one is to get a cheap adapter jack, connect your guitar to your laptop through the line-in input and use one of the zillions of free or commercial amp simulators on your computer. Unfortunately this will not give you good tone, because the guitar output is not ...


3

It does make a difference, but not in the audio quality. In general it is a good idea to leave unused channels at their lowest amplitude setting to prevent accidentally blasting your headphones, speakers, or ears (which can happen in many different ways). In that sense, yes, it is better to turn volume regulators to mute for unused headphone amplifier ...


3

You definitely want different sets for different situations. For playing live, you first want something with very good isolation. Then, depending on how and why you use them, you want to think about things like how easy and fast is to put them on/off, how easy is to move around with them, and their frequency response. You might not want them to be as ...


3

You are looking for a headphone amplifier. Many models have more than a single stereo output. Professional models often have more than one output (channeL) in the same module, and sometimes allow you to either feed the same signal to all the channels or have a separate signal for every channel (as you would do with a mixer that supports auxiliary outputs). ...


3

Down your back, inside your shirt. Tie it round your belt to preserve the necessary spare cable. Extender as required for overall length, couple of quid from Maplin's etc.


3

You may want to consider the distinction between open backed and closed backed headphones. Open backed are usually considered to give better sound quality, and better bass response, but won't block any noise in the environment, and allow bleed-through if you end up recording via a microphone. Also, the fact that they allow air flow can make them more ...


3

For playing at home, in my opinion there is nothing better than some amp simulators. Try GuitarRig or AmpliTube (I prefer AmpliTube). For playing at home and maybe making some recordings it is a really good solution. You just need a USB interface for your guitar and a pair of headphones. Install it on your computer and start to play. Both programs have lots ...


2

Recording studios used to have (not sure if they still do) a set of 'ordinary' speakers to play back final mixes through. They were the sort that Mr. Average would have in his front room.Hi-fi, but not state of the art, just a fair sound. A bit like i-pods produce now.The eq. would be set flat. If your speakers already produce lots of bass, I can't ...


2

An effective way to have noise-isolating headphones is to use earphones under industrial muffs. You don't specify whether they are to stop others hearing what you're listening to, or to stop extraneous noise getting to your ears, but this will work either way.Obviously, full size headphones won't do it, but smaller, good quality in-ear phones will. The ...


2

This is what the impedance spec refers to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_impedance It's nothing to do with sound isolation. I doubt there is any spec that can accurately represent the level of sound isolation. This is because the level of isolation is almost entirely dependent on the fit; How well they fit to your particular head shape and the ...


2

I skimmed through your youtube video, and found a spot at about 1:07:08 or 1:07:09 that I think shows what you're talking about. We hear strings and piano, the drummer has some rests, nods his head with the beat and then comes in. In this case my guess is he isn't listening to a click track, because there is a conductor -- I saw the conductor at, for ...


2

Do I need a USB Audio Interface to run a Dynamic Mic with PC? (Even if I am going to use it only for online calls in the beginning!) It depends on which mic you get. You can find models with everything it needs included (like preamp and converter, which are the most common tasks of an audio interface). In that case you don't need an audio interface. ...


2

I can relate. I like to play my guitar late at night as well. It helps me unwind and relax. The least expensive way to accomplish your goal is a small headphone guitar amp such as the Vox amPlug AC30 that looks like the one pictured below which you can find for under $20.00: Or if you want more controls - a Concept 3 Guitar Headphone Amp is less than ...


1

If you hope to merely plug a set of headphones straight into the guitar/bass and hear it - no! The pick-ups need to be routed via a pre-amp at least. This could be a proper guitar amp, with a headphone socket used so the sound doesn't come through the speaker, or an effects pedalboard, which is a great way as you can colour the sound as you go. A simple way ...


1

Just speaking in terms of what I'd do, but - honestly I'd just get a small combo amp and plug the headphones into it. I had a nice Marshall guitar amp that sells for about $400 new. It was everything a full blown half stack is, but just in a smaller, apartment friendly package (so, i.e., it had one speaker, instead of four, and less watts...BUT..it had all ...


1

First of all, it sounds like your Y-splitter is either defective, or something is basically wrong with it. It's also possible that the headphone jack doesn't provide enough juice to drive both headphones, or one of your headphones has a short or something. Now, to your real issue. What you need is a small, basic mixer, that you can plug each separate ...


1

A mic level input requires a mic preamp to bring it up to line level before it could be fed into a headphone amp. You could buy a separate mic pre and headphone amp, but getting a little mixer is a good idea since it's a nice tool to have around and you'll probably spend less on a mixer. The one other option would be to get a computer audio interface that ...


1

You need an audio interface (hardware device with mic/line inputs/output and a USB or FireWire computer connection) that allows both "direct monitoring" (Focusrite's description), and has a software mixer that lets you listen to both the input AND other audio from your computer. I think most interfaces these days have direct monitoring, but I'm not sure how ...


1

Just to be clear... you're only looking for audio output, correct? You aren't planning to do any recording? I ask, because usually, when I see people asking about external soundcards, it's going the other way -- they're looking at recording, and need a better ADC (Analog to Digital Converter). I would expect built-in soundcards to be more oriented towards ...


1

Getting a longer cable / extension is the way to go. Then you can easily place the cable behind your back so your playing isn't affected


1

re charles' comment, i would always treat headphones the same as other speakers - they are speakers - and leave them til the end when starting up. the jack won't wear out. and if you're not careful you could blow your ears out if your headphones are on when you turn on the amp/source/etc. (so don't put the headphones on until everything is running and turned ...


1

Everyone so far has offered software solutions but as I read it you want to practice using your amp and effects pedals rather than substitute with an software based amp sim so I would suggest getting a cab emulator such as the Two Notes Torpedo CAB and run a line out from your amp bypassing the amps internal speaker, use the cab simulator to emulate your own ...



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