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17

Generally no. As long as they aren't bleeding it's just part of the process of building up callouses for playing. You may experience some swollen finger tips and the skin will get a bit harder. If pain persists for a long time after you stop playing, or if you're bleeding, you might have cause for concern. There's some honour to be had among fellow players ...


17

Drinking cold water long-term won't make your voice "lousier". The whole idea behind singing is to have your vocal cords and surrounding muscles as loose as possible while singing. Hydration is a huge part of healthy vocal cords, so drink as much water as you can (hot, cold, or otherwise). It's just recommended that if you get thirsty either just before or ...


16

If what you want is to improve your vocal range, I would recommend these exercises: Warm up. Always warm up for a while before starting the actual exercise, doing easy vocalise in the middle of your vocal range. Scales, Thirds and Fourths. All types of scales that go through your entire vocal range. Practice them as often as you can. This will gradually ...


16

Basically, neither fingers nor your wrist should hurt. Tension is your enemy, you have to become aware of tension before it becomes pain. In the words of Joe Satriani : No pain, no pain. If it's the thumb, chances are you're grabbing the neck as if you were falling and needed to hold onto it, that's not the way it should be : the thumb is an anchor for the ...


14

Sorry to hear that your playing is impacted. I don't have R.A., but I have a number of wrist, shoulder, and arm problems. Here are some things that I have found useful for my situation - I hope they can help you with yours: Electric guitars. Electrics in general have lower string tension than acoustics. Light strings. The lighter the string, the less ...


13

You say in your update this happens despite using a pick - in which case I would say the most appropriate solution is a slight change of technique. Using a pick, my nails never come into contact with the strings, despite using a fairly short amount of pick beyond my thumb/fingers. For songs where I want to use my thumb to create pinch harmonics I pull the ...


10

Assuming you're using a traditional right-handed setup, if you want a permanent fix, you're probably going to have to relearn how to pick. The cause of RSIs related to music are usually the result of excess tension somewhere in the body. For a guitar picking hand, you might want to look up materials related to violin bow hold, since excess tension in this ...


10

Of course it can cause stiff fingers. Or sore wrists, arms, shoulders, backs, hips, necks. The causes are bad posture, too much guitar weight, or over-stressing muscles and joints from overuse. Getting the action lowered can help. If you use heavy gauge strings consider switching to some that are lighter. Some players like heavy strings for the sound, but ...


10

There are several things you can do to warm up your vocal cords properly. Sing half-scales using vowel sounds ("oo","oh","ee","ah","eh") Sing half-scales using vowel sounds + h (great for rough vocal days) ("hoo","hoh","hee,"hah,"heh") Sing half-scales using vowel sounds + m ("moo","moh","mee","mah","meh") Hum scales and half-scales. Do neck rolls (these ...


10

Without seeing a picture of your playing position or watching your technique, it is difficult to offer proper advice. Let me preface my answer by saying that it would be a good idea to see someone about it - a friend of yours who teaches guitar, a guitar professor at a local university, even a doctor such as a physical therapist could help you and probably ...


9

Tom has already started a metaphor with runners. You do not train for a long-range distance (such as 20km or marathon) by running this distance. You have to help your body become the kind of body able to run such a distance. And it includes drinking water, many breaks, changes in lifestyle. Health of the hands is not separated from the general health. ...


9

I had a classical guitar teacher give me an exercise for this, because I was experiencing tendonitis in my whole left hand. The problem is that over the years I had gradually developed a habit of squeezing down much too hard in fretting notes. Her exercise was this: Grab a chord that uses all four left-hand fingers and fret it like you normally would. Now, ...


8

It is often not sweet drinks, per se, but what's in the most popular sweet drinks. So for example, soda (I assume the UK equivalent would be a 'soft drink' like Coca Cola?) often contains caffeine, which has a dehydrating effect and therefore affects the voice. This was borne out by a study in 1999 'Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study'* ...


8

First, I've been a professional musician, but I'm not a professional singer - nonetheless, I've recently started working with a teacher that has made a huge difference in my singing, and the lessons are fresh in my mind. The trick, I believe, is learning to tell the difference between your voice being tired vs. strained. If you are straining, you are ...


8

Overbite would only inhibit brass playing potential if your jaw caused your lips to close in a really odd way. You don't need straight teeth to play a brass instrument. If you're using your teeth / jaw to play brass, then you're headed for trouble. If your lips look like everyone else's when your mouth is closed / relaxed, then I can't anticipate you ...


7

Permanently? Not really; there's nothing that would be generally called "food" or "drink" that would immediately and permanently have a detrimental effect on your singing voice. However, avoid cigarette smoking (really any type of smoking or tobacco use) and alcohol, as these can have a cumulative effect that builds up over time. If you stop now, before any ...


6

Have you tried adjusting the position of your bass while playing? I find that the higher the bass sits, the less stress on my wrist. I could never understand how bassists like Krist Novoselic could possibly be comfortable with the bass slung so low.


6

Always warm up in the middle of your range and gradually approach the limits of your range with upward and downward moving repetition of motifs. e.g. C3 D3 E3 D3 C3--- | D3 E3 F3 E3 D3--- | E3 F3 G3 F3 E3--- | and so on... Even a single warm up with ascending and descending exercises will temporarily increase your range for a time. Exercises that cross ...


6

Your thumb hurts because you are pushing your thumb backwards on itself in order to support your hand position on the neck. The only way forward is to practice bar chords as much as you can, and your thumb and hand will eventually become stronger. Hope this helps.


6

Have you made any changes to your guitar, the strap, how you stand or sit? Posture can make a big difference in your hands because of the angle of your hand on the neck. Playing with the guitar too low causes an acute angle at your wrist and fingers, and depending on how your hands are shaped, just might not be a good idea for you. Changes to the guitar's ...


6

Nowadays I always get a close shave before playing the tuba in a gig. I started doing this when I realized that after longer breaks from playing I had trouble getting a distinct attack and tone when I had facial hair around the lips. I also had trouble playing pedal-notes. I then experienced getting a close shave as "gaining" one or two weeks of practice, ...


6

Smoking greatly increases the chance that you will develop vocal nodes, and that the quality of your voice will be permanently changed. After years of singing, many singers, even those who do not smoke, suffer from permanent, tiny lesions or scar tissue that grow on the vocal cords. These are called vocal nodes, and they make the voice sound rough and weak. ...


5

Several of the answers mention calluses. I remember bleeding fingers and calluses cracking and splitting. You'll find that eventually they'll go away and the fingertips won't be hard, won't crack or hurt either. I think it was about five or seven years after playing regularly when I realized mine had changed. I don't know if it was because my guitars ...


5

Psychotropic means mind-altering. The most common use of the word is in psychotropic drugs -- that is drugs which alter mood, perception, consciousness and behaviour. Psychotropic Music is a term used by some people to describe music which they believe alters mood, perception, consciousness and behaviour in a similar way to such drugs. It's likely that ...


5

According to a post at the New York University Medical School answer center, smoking and exposure to smoke irritate and dry the tissues of the throat, particularly the vocal cords. This leads to improper vocal cord vibration and function. Smoking also may promote acid reflux, which can affect the vocal cords. Finally, smoking degrades lung function, ...


4

I've worried about this same thing in the past. Unless the symptoms are unbearable you should be able to make some simple adjustments and avoid further harm. The easiest way to describe the most gentle picking hand position is to straighten your wrist so it isn't bent at all and then position your guitar in such a way that the strings end up in the proper ...


4

I had to stop using a footstool altogether and instead put both feet flat on the floor and use a cushion to elevate the guitar into the correct playing angle. This enabled me to keep my spine straight and my hips in the right alignment. The other device you can use is a support bracket that attaches to the underside of your guitar. I'm convinced that ...


4

I don't think there's a 'correct' posture, it's different for everyone. Sure there are conventions people follow, guitar on left leg, footstool, etc, but the best one for you is the one that allows you to play what you need to play without any pain. I'm a tall guy and I went through dozens of different setups before I found something I liked. Taking breaks ...



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