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9

As topo morto already commented, it doesn't really make sense to consider pop as just an evolution of classical music. It has lots of influences from folk, blues, jazz that don't really make sense from a classical-harmony perspective. To a large degree, you might also just sum pop up as “relax, focus on keeping the melody simple&catchy and then ...


9

Rumour or hearsay, I think, abetted by C.P.E. Bach. Yes. Evidently Santamaria's Arte de taƱer fantasia from the 16th century gives examples of quick scale passages using the thumb, and also warns about using the thumb on black keys except when paired with an octave. I'm getting this secondhand (Historical Harpsichord Technique: Developing La douceur du ...


4

Is it just a matter of chance that we note music as we do? One of the ideas put forward by A generative theory of tonal music is that "the events of a piece are related to a regular alternation of strong and weak beats at a number of hierarchical levels" - I believe the suggestion is that this is something fundamental to the human experience of music, ...


4

One point of view is given by Peter van der Merwe in a couple of interesting books. "Origins of the Popular Style: The Antecedents of Twentieth-Century Popular Music" and "Roots of the Classical: the Popular Origins of Western Music." Another interesting book is Alec Wilder's "American Popular Song" but it only covers the period up to about 1950. ...


3

Yes, many old organs were built with only some of the 12 chromatic keys in some octaves (particularly the lowest one, since the biggest pipes are the most expensive ones). The reason is that the more remote chromatic tones were rarely used in compositions of the time, and so this saved a lot of money for only a little inconvenience. The same was also done ...


2

In the USA, orchestra musicians belong to the American Federation of Musicians as a matter of course. The AFM is location-based and oriented towards professionals such as studio, show and classical musicians. Other musicians can join AFM Local 1000. Check out the website for the benefits.


2

CPE Bach certainly made that assertion about his father, but remember that they both had very limited access to anything except "contemporary music", compared with what is available to anyone today. If you look at any collection of 16th century keyboard music written 50-100 years before JSB), it is full of octave stretches, especially for the left hand. ...


2

I think you're complicating your work with a simple misconception: classical music was just the pop music of its day. It's incredibly broad, and 99% of the classical music composed is mostly forgotten - what we're playing as classical music nowadays is cherry picked, "best of the best" (which is inherently subjective, of course). Tracing the "evolution" of ...


1

I don't remember where I read this, but some scholarly music history article traced the back beat to the early 1920s or so and claimed it originated with the country music (then called "hillbilly" to distinguish it from "race" music) guitar strumming patterns. It does seem to be common in US developed music, jazz, country, rock, etc. Edit: I found a nice ...


1

(Sorry, this was to be a comment continuing on the previous thread, but I wanted to include pictures) This picture was used in a video class I've seen, by Prof. Craig Wright from Yale where he corroborated the perspective that primite (late medieval/early renaissance context) keyboard playing was done without using the thumbs. He also referred to what he ...



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