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7

Today we have digital tuners and we agree that all instruments are tuned to A = 440 cycles per second. There were no such standards in those days. I doubt any of them would have perfect pitch in the modern sense of the term, because every church they went into would have a pipe organ tuned to a different reference pitch. Furthermore in that time, pipe ...


4

As Laurence alludes to, when discussing "perfect" pitch, there is a difference between relative pitch and absolute pitch. Relative pitch -- knowing where a pitch falls within the context of a scale, and hearing the purity of intervals (rather than individual pitches) -- can be learned relatively easily, through exposure to music, and most musicians probably ...


2

This is a typical example of a modal keyboard piece from the late 16th or early 17th century. Mode in polyphonic music (as distinguished from mode in plainchant) is a complicated topic that is being actively researched by musicologists and is still the subject of scholarly debate. It is a different way of thinking about music that just can't be compared ...


2

Pedrell's edition is here. Yes, you can call this the 4th tone. Note the points of imitation on B and E; notice that the dux and comes of the opening point emphasise C & F respectively before falling back to the final. Subsequent points (such as at the start of page 2) have similar incipits. Note also that IV (A major) does not appear in cadences, ...


1

I contacted Dr. Tymoczko and asked for an example. His response was Mozart, piano sonata K310 in A minor, 3rd movement, starting at m.211.


1

First - you should be aware that Tymoczko's usage here is not standard. The term fauxbourdon is usually only used to refer to the late Medieval/early Renaissance technique of almost pervasively harmonizing in this manner. This is all before tonal harmony, and fauxbourdon can be employed in any mode, though care needs to be taken to use B-flat or B as ...


1

If you take a look at the St John's Passion by Bach, it is surprisingly operatic with its use of turba choirs and the kind of introductory chorus and the dying scenes. It is true that Bach was employed by churches for large stretches of his time (as opposed to his time in K├Âthen, for example), including his final years. But if you take a look at his magnum ...



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