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2

Most of the time in classical, but not always - sometimes the half-measure ends up being more important (irregular phrase lengths). Not always in much of classical music. You don't have to look far to find pieces in which the inner voices are absolutely essential, and not just as harmonic filler, but as focal points - just look at some of Mozart's string ...


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NOTE: Althogh the question sounds specific, it goes to a lot wider discussion. Consider my answer as notes on the subject. "Melody" sings over "harmony" type instrumental music mostly originates from imitating songs with instruments which already have song forms. Later instrumental music developed more complex structures with respect to the instrumentation ...


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Interesting idea! It's somewhat 'chicken and egg'. A sequence of 4 or 5 notes may have several chords which will underlie them. Similarly, a sequence of chords may have any number of melodies played over them - ask any jazzer! For some note sequences, there will be one overriding set of chords that will be best fit. Similarly, vice-versa. Some, if not most. ...


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Older works keep older instruments in use among professionals and amateurs. You may not have any visibility of the early music community, but there are quite a lot of us and we're out there playing recorders, viols, baroque flutes and oboes, baroque violins, harpsichords, clavichords, hurdy gurdies, musette du cour, rauschpfifes, racketts, shawms, sackbuts, ...


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I play for dancers so here's my take: The musicians are counting each bar with four beats per bar (measure) but actually there are only two accented (louder) beats per bar, on the "1" and the "3". These accented beats provide the pulse of the music. The dancers are counting these accented beats in their "8" counts. When you dance and count to "8" on a 32 ...


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I don't understand your example: I would consider the C clarinet the least common one and B♭ by far the most common one. With transposing instruments switching to a different instrument is more difficult, since you either have to rely on the musician to transpose mentally or need a new edition of his or her part. I consider the answer to have two parts: ...


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I've voted to close this as "too broad" -- the answer could be a whole book -- but I couldn't resist chiming in anyway. You've chosen to focus on pitch, when rhythm is just as important if not more so -- some pieces of music have to pitched component. The maths in musical rhythm is apparent. You ask about the 7 notes ABCDEFG, but a piano, and traditional ...


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Generally, in most music that progresses in phrase lengths that are multiples of 2 bars (which covers a lot of dance music), the odd-numbered bars generally have greater stress than the even-numbered bars. To be precise, the first beats of the odd-numbered bars have more weight than the first beats of the even-numbered bars, and the starting points of ...


3

Try Twentieth-Century Harmony: Creative Aspects and Practice by Vincent Persichetti. While it is not based on functional harmony, it has a section that specifically addresses the sounds made by combining different triads, as well as tetrachords, and it gives literal descriptions of how these chords "sound" ("acidic" and other descriptive adjectives). Also, ...


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Yes, they were real. They were experimental, and I'm sure they were horrendously expensive and difficult to build. But they were all built before the era of electronic amplification, which gives a clue as to why they existed. They could play the very low notes of the 32-foot ranks of a church pipe organ (lower than the conventional acoustic double-bass) ...


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As far as I can find, it was likely just a really big double bass! Whilst it may appear somewhat equivalent to the octobass - it is different to the maintained examples in the Musée de la Musique and Musical Instrument Museum in that: a) It has 4 strings, rather than 3; b) Octobass's appear to normally have a extension mechanism for the 'fingerings', to ...


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My guess is you referring to a Octobass . Unfortunately, I don't know a lot about them I have only seen them in a music museum so I'll paraphrase some Wikipedia and whatever I recall from the tour guide. The Octobass is considered to be a larger version of a double bass. Standing on average at a size of 3.48 meters, this large instrument was built by ...


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There was an instrument made called the Octobass. It has three strings and is essentially a larger version of the double bass... Because of the impractically large size of its fingerboard and thickness of its strings, the strings were stopped by the use of an intricate system of hand- and foot-activated levers and pedals. The instrument was, ...



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