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Where did this idea originate? West Africa, then transplanted to the New World. It is a defining characteristic of African-American music, and all the styles of music that grew out of and were influenced by African-American music. It then spread to the rest of the world via the 20th-century music of the USA, Cuba, Brazil, Jamaica, and other nations with ...


9

No, they are not considered consonant in all music cultures. The perception of consonance and dissonance can be different among cultures. The same interval can be perceived (and labeled) differently by different cultures. This is influenced by many factors (and the harmonic series is not the only one!) For example, in medieval times major thirds were ...


0

Octaves and fifths are very prominent physical properties of sound-making objects. The octave is the first harmonic, the fifth is the 2nd harmonic. Very closely related: the octave is what you get from halving the length of a string, the 5th is one-third. This means that you hear the octave and the fifth prominently within single notes, even for primitive ...


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Octaves and fifths will usually be consonant in any music culture, simply because that's the intervals their tuning systems is based on. In traditional western music this is Pythagorean tuning. Thirds only appear as ditones in that system, and they are so sharp they're normally considered dissonant. Thus styles such as Gregorian chant avoid them. You might ...


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Music Theory is an academic discipline that throughout history has been developed in order to better understand the music being written and played by composers and performers. As such, it is also an incredibly useful tool in teaching all kinds of music to beginners. In many cases, the composers of the day were teaching students to follow rules that they ...


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Wind instruments have their basic mechanisms and ranges designed around a diatonic scale, and notation is also designed around a diatonic scale. If you tell all piano players "from now on, you'll be playing everything a minor third higher on sight", all except the most skilled ones will not be amused: their keyboard is designed around the diatonic scale of ...


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The question is so broad I don't think it can be answered accurately. In terms of melody and harmony, there is a basis in physics for the concept of the "octave", where doubling or halving a note's frequency of vibration will result in a note that sounds as though it has the same identity, despite being higher or lower. So that is the finite source of ...



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