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Certainly. It would be pointless to even call something "Variationen" that would not be intended to be listened to as a whole. It is a phenomenon of our modern times that attentions spans have diminuished so much that whole "solo concerts" or "classic samplers" are created by ripping out central movements from larger works and mashing them up with ...


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My music history professor, Joel Sheveloff, told us that Goldberg would not have played the whole thing through for the Count every night. He imagined the Count requesting numbers according to his mood: "Play some of the canons." "Play the quodlibet." I don't think we can know for sure, but Prof. Sheveloff had better credentials than I do. Even so, ...


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To answer your question directly, yes, the Goldberg Variations are a continuous musical work. There is no indication in the score of a break or intermission. In fact, there are fermatas over the bar lines after some variations, which is a performance indication. They were meant to be played continuously, and appreciated as a piece of art. You must ...


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As I understand it, yes; I believe that they were commissioned by an insomniac and these variations were intended to be played in order to facilitate his restfulness. Having said that, I must confess that this work is my favorite classical music because it contains so many different moods. In particular, I prefer Glenn Gould's second recording over his ...


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To complement Pat's awesome in-depth how-did-it-work answer, here's how it looked: This is from smashinglists.com, and it is noted there: A cuneiform tablet from Nippur in Iraq dated to 2000 BCE indicates the names of strings on the lyre and represents the earliest known example of music notation. Although these tablets were fragmentary, these tablets ...


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You must not have heard of the Bösendorfer Imperial 290 piano, which has 9 extra notes lower than "A", for a total of 97 keys. The soundboard is 2.9 meters in length. It is a popular model in large churches and concert halls, but it is very expensive at around €150.000. It has been on the market for more than 100 years. The Bösendorfer company is in Vienna, ...


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Because a G# down there is below the range of human hearing. You will only hear overtones and not the fundamental bass note. In my experience, only rarely do I hear the fundamental bass note of the first few keys of the piano. Possible explanations are: The room is not large enough for the wave to develop The piano itself is not large enough to ...



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