Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Martin Luther, long before he broke with the Catholic Church, believed that music was a form of prayer, through which the people spoke to God and God spoke back. History states that he didn't actively encourage his congregation to sing along until after his publishing of the 95 Theses and his excommunication, but some sources say he encouraged it at ...


1

I believe in those centuries (16th and 17th), going to church was a very important day each week in most European communities. With that in mind, I believe in both cases, the congregation was as involved as they could be. However, Lutheran hymns are written in the local language, which had been done in order to more greatly involve the congregation. ...


0

My take is that a usual dance step needs 8 counts to complete. Particularly in couple dancing. I perform music, teach and recently took some dance and wondered this myself 😀


1

Certainly. It would be pointless to even call something "Variationen" that would not be intended to be listened to as a whole. It is a phenomenon of our modern times that attentions spans have diminuished so much that whole "solo concerts" or "classic samplers" are created by ripping out central movements from larger works and mashing them up with ...


3

My music history professor, Joel Sheveloff, told us that Goldberg would not have played the whole thing through for the Count every night. He imagined the Count requesting numbers according to his mood: "Play some of the canons." "Play the quodlibet." I don't think we can know for sure, but Prof. Sheveloff had better credentials than I do. Even so, ...


3

To answer your question directly, yes, the Goldberg Variations are a continuous musical work. There is no indication in the score of a break or intermission. In fact, there are fermatas over the bar lines after some variations, which is a performance indication. They were meant to be played continuously, and appreciated as a piece of art as a whole. You ...


0

As I understand it, yes; I believe that they were commissioned by an insomniac and these variations were intended to be played in order to facilitate his restfulness. Having said that, I must confess that this work is my favorite classical music because it contains so many different moods. In particular, I prefer Glenn Gould's second recording over his ...


0

To complement Pat's awesome in-depth how-did-it-work answer, here's how it looked: This is from smashinglists.com, and it is noted there: A cuneiform tablet from Nippur in Iraq dated to 2000 BCE indicates the names of strings on the lyre and represents the earliest known example of music notation. Although these tablets were fragmentary, these tablets ...



Top 50 recent answers are included