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9

To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


8

There are two components involved here. One is indeed ear training, and the other one is knowing your instrument well, i.e. being able to produce any melody as effortlessly as you do with your voice. And for this second part, you do not need to consciously know the intervals as long as you intuitively find the right notes on your instrument. But anyway, ...


5

First of all: This will take time! Don't worry or give up too quickly! It is possible to learn - but it will take time! Training your ear like this usually works best with a teacher or someone you can pair up with. This way you can practice together or a teacher can give you advise. Fortunately there are also free tools on the internet to train your ear. ...


4

I would call what you want to do - playing melodies by ear. It's easier to do on piano because of the logical way the keyboard is laid out. Ascending one key is always a semitone higher, descending lower. Piano was the first instrument I learned to play and I quickly developed the ability to play any melody by ear on the piano. With guitar, it took ten ...


3

A nice addendum to Caleb Hines' answer is that if you take all the most common intervals, you get M2, m3, P4, P5, M6, and m7, which is the Dorian mode. What's significant about this is that the Dorian mode is a point of symmetry in our diatonic scale. If you use D as a center point and move both up and down in perfect 5ths, you end up getting the diatonic ...


2

With the guitar being a positional instrument, meaning one can play the same tune in many different keys but retain the same fingering and strings, merely moving where on the neck the tune is played, then knowing note names as the tune unfolds is not necessary. The relationship between the tonic and other notes, as far as where they are relatively speaking, ...


2

Start simple. Take a familiar tune like "Happy Birthday" and pick a starting note. Lets just pick "G" (this means you will be playing the tune in the key of C Major). Keep trying to play the song, re-starting from the beginning every time until you can get through the entire thing. At first, this will be difficult. You'll play the first 8 notes, and ...


2

I suggest starting with lead sheets, with melody and chords only. The term "playing by ear" was always a pejorative when I was young. It meant some kind of illiterate flailing at the instrument, maybe learning rote patterns with no idea of how they worked together musically. (Think of little kids playing "Heart and Soul" with four hands - great fun.) But ...


2

Here are some suggestions, have a try and let us know how it goes: Get a feel for the tune CD player / Media player, play a tune that is not too complicated you have never learnt Listen to the whole tune a few times until you can hear in your head what the next melody will be before it plays Learn in parts - Play a few seconds at a time (a phrase) and ...


2

Jim did an excellent job of describing how to hear intervals and melodies. There are a couple other aspects of music that can really help you to be a better performer and listener, if you get used to looking for them. When I'm transcribing or learning a piece, I try to listen first broadly, then in more detail. How much time I spend listening at each ...


1

Mix it up to make it interesting. Sometimes, play something melodic in the right hand, with chords in the left hand. Sometimes, play something rhythmically interesting in the left hand (fairly low down) while you play chords in the right hand. And so on. Experiment with different amounts of contrast between left and right hands, see what you feel goes ...


1

It seems we're having the same problem here, tapping into the well-fed musical inner ear we all have rather than being stuck in the over analytical and somewhat sterile frame of mind. My own toolbox for that : Ear training, especially on common melodies, or any melody that just won't leave, even if I have to wait a whole day before testing my solution on ...


1

Maybe get in the habit of singing along with your guitar. Or maybe I should say, play along with your voice. It seems that when you use your voice, your natural creativity comes out more directly. So if you allow your voice and your hands to track each other, maybe your inner creativity will have an easier time flowing through your guitar.


1

"Strong" melodic notes are notes that are in the chord being played, especially if they're played on the beats. Use your interval patterns as embellishments on the strong melodic notes that you play or as a way of breaking up or embellishing scalar runs. It's good in small doses. It's especially effective when you shred using very fast runs up and down ...


1

I'm a classical improviser and teacher thereof. I think of improvising as a classical musician as musical conversation (assuming I am playing with someone else or with several people): I talk about something I are familiar with in a comfortable way (I don't try to talk too fast or use words I don't know). The other person listens to what I have said and then ...



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