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9

tl;dr: You can always guess what notes to play by ear and find what notes sound good, but at the end of the day you are playing in a scale and you should be aware of that. There are some guitarists that don't know scale (or music theory for that matter) and they tend to play by ear. They listen to the progression and try to play something over it and ...


8

As I'm quite easily affected by alcohol and caffeine (being a lightweight and having terrible problems with focusing does that to you), I think I can add some stuff from my own experience here. The main thought to keep in mind is that this is different for each person individually, though. A dose that works for you may very well have an opposite effect for ...


4

I think the most important thing you need is to learn how to dive in your guitar's neck without getting lost. Moving around past a certain speed and without watching where your fingers are requires tons of practice. That practice relies in repeating some pattern over and over and over. You can try 1 million solos, practice them, improve and master them and ...


3

You seem to be mistaken in thinking that playing scales means you have to play the same scales as everyone else - you don't. In fact, even playing chords and/or arpeggios is a form of playing scales. A scale is, informally, nothing more than a system of dividing a range of frequencies into discrete steps. So saying you 'refuse' to learn scales is, in a ...


2

One solution could be to find some more spazz-loving dudes/dudettes and freak out with them together with all the coffee you like. When that's out of your system you're probably more mellow with the other band. Side effect: some interesting music might be produced. Win-win.


2

I drank half a bottle of coke the other day (a big one) which led to a 4 hour session of music making. So I know where your coming from. Here are some things that help me. Lows are underrated, don't knock them. Just make sure you are generally eating and drinking well so you do have the energy I think what your describing is anxiety, so have a google of ...


2

I think you're approaching this with the right attitude of cautious attention to effects, one that can apply to almost any drug (except the really scary ones). The obvious next thing to try is half a cup of coffee. Or half-caff coffee. Disclaimer: I work for starbucks, so I want to help you find a way to keep drinking coffee, in some form. :)


2

If you really want to understand how alcohol and caffiene affect the body then you need to take into account a great many things, and need to consider them rather as a stimulant and a depressant. There's an interesting point about coffee that it makes you perform better than without it... but only if you're a regular coffee drinker. The reason for this ...


2

There is nothing "wrong" with Booze or Coffee however, you might be able to do without either with nutritional supplementation. Coffee will dehydrate you, regardless of the benefits. So, if you're going to sing, you might actually damage your throat if you're dehydrated. If coffee is as noticable as you say for you, then booze really isn't the answer. Based ...


2

The answer, as you can tell from the above, is whatever works for you. The musicians in my band either drink beer or coffee depending on what they feel will work for them. Since they're all professionals and none of them are problem drinkers, it's not an issue for us. Sometimes I have a beer or a glass of wine to relax. Being in a relaxed state of mind is ...


2

I'm a guitarist and vocalist for a groovy rock band. When gigging, I quite often have a pint of lager (about 4-5% alc. nothing major) just to calm the nerves a bit. I find it works well and that strangely it also gives me a bit more energy, for an hour or so. Then I need to chug the water to replace what's lost in sweat. Bleah. When practicing, I never ...


2

Not learning scales is like being a weightlifter who ignores leg day. They are in some ways the most boring thing you can do, but fundamental in more subtle ways than you may realize. I would say scales are not important because they are the fundamental unit of music theory (which may be wrong but the first years of music theory pedagogy can imply it), but ...


1

I'm assuming you have a core tune you've written and you want to add a solo. If so, then my suggestion is to put down the guitar, put on the headphones, and listen to the song for... weeks or months if that's what it takes. Start to hear a solo in your head. When you have a very accurate "sonic vision" of the solo you want, then grab the guitar and find ...


1

The guitar neck is a featureless grid of notes. The vast majority of music is played in a key (which if you read about the history of music, and in particular pythagorean tuning, is fundamental to the way frequency ratios between notes work.) You only need to learn one scale by rote: the pentatonic. That will give you a sense of where 'home' is on the neck ...


1

I learned all the music theory I know (not much, but enough to get by), and a lot of great stuff about how chords (and thus solos) are built, from this pretty awesome...comic book: http://www.planetalkguitar.com/ The author is a professional guitarist who never worries about scales - the whole book is about chord tones (which like everything else in music, ...


1

There are plenty of arguments for learning scales, and some against. I've played with many,many musos (and loads of guitarists !!), some of whom know scales, some don't. It's often not possible to decide which camp an individual is in when they play. There are great players out there who play 'from the soul' and haven't a clue about scales, keys or theory of ...


1

Great advice above, My preference is to start playing in whatever is a natural mode for you. You should try using your mind powers to get into the mood you want on the amped/mellow scale. Then after an hour or so of adrenaline and sounds pumping through you is a great time to have a puff or a drink. Extensive exercise can get you stuck in a mode and a ...


1

I'm a kale-smoothie drinkin' musician. Now that we have set the tone: When practicing at home (notice: NOT driving-yourself-home), when practicing at home I find that my self-listening is less stressed when taking some of those melty melatonin vitamins, 9mg to be exact, and it helps to practice before bedtime. Naturemade has 'em and calls them vitamelts ...



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